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HARVARD UNIVERSITY 




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LIBRARY 



OF THE 



Museum of Comparative Zoology 



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in 2013 



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THE- 



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VOL. xv 



APRIL. 1919 



The- Object of this magazine- is 

to Make- North Ameeicathe 5iggest 

Gahe Producing Country in the World 





CANVASBACKS AND OTHERS RAISED AT AMSTON 



Anyone Can Hatch Pheasant Chicks, but it 
takes Experience to Rear Them Successfully 

DO YOU KNOW THE VALUE OP 

SPRATT'S 

Pheasant Meals Nos. 5 and 1 2 
and Chicgrain 




1 These foods are used by the leading Game Breeders throughout 
the world and there is nothing on the market that can take their place. 



If your dealer cannot supply you, write to us for prices and further particulars. 



Send 2c stamp for "Dog Culture, " 10c for "Poultry Culture" 
and 25c for "Pheasant Culture" 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 

Factory also in London, England 



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THE GAME BREEDER 



HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDEJIS 




CHALLENCK GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 



rf ffiBLACK SHE1XS 

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CLIMAX 



FIELD 
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REPEATER 

LLAULli 



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RECORD 



Winchester 



REPEATED 
LEADER 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Let your trap gun purchase be a PARKER. 
Be one of the thousands of satisfied PARKER 
Gun users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The 
purchaser of a PARKER Gun receives in good sub- 
stantial gun value, the benefits of experience in gun 
manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never 
be satisfied with anything but the BEST. _ _ _ __. — _ _ _ __ _ 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not " A tC VLtL, K. O SX VJ S . 

now? Master Gun Makers MERIDEN, CONN., U. S. A 

Send for catalogue and free booklet about 20 bore gnns. New York Salesrooms, 25 Murray Street 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — Game in Wyoming — Restocking Ranges — Fish Losses 
— Antelope and Deer — Antelope Breeding — Mountain Sheep and Buffalo — Game 
Birds — Game Ranches Needed — The Appetite for Legislation — Game Law- 
Outrages — The Wrong State — Sad Outlook in California. 

The Audobon Societies and Game Farming - - - T. Gilbert Pearson 

Wild Turkey Notes .■"---- Caton and Mcllhenney 

Breeding Wild Fowl ------- D. W. Huntington 

Grouse Notes with Comment by the Editor. A. J. Stuart Wortley & H. A. Macpherson 
Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves ... gy Our Readers 

Editorials, Outings and Innings, Trade Notes, Etc. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 



Ringnecks Chinese Reeves Golden 

Silver Amherst Japanese Silky Fowl 

Book your order for eggs now. Eggs in any quantity from the 
Japanese Silky — Rhode Island Red Cross. The perfect mother 
tor large breeders of Pheasants. 

We have one of the largest exclusive Game Breeding Farms in the U. S., and we 
warrant every bird we ship to be in prime condition for breeding or show purposes. 

We are now contracting full wing Ringnecks in any quantity up to 5,000 for 
August and early fall delivery. 

If you want some splendid Chinese-Mongolian cocks for new blood in your pens, 
and are willing to pay $} each for them, send us a check. Hens $4.50. 
Expensive, but they're worth it, Member of the Game Guild 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY, 



MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



3 




Home — 2,000,000 Marksmen ! 



Look to your laurels, Brother Trapshooters. Two million gun-wise soldiers, 
justly proud of their gunskill, are now coming back to prove their prowess. 

TRAPSHOOTING . 

will soon be in full blast and greater than ever. The soldier knows. He "loves" a gun. The 
call of the big outdoors, the call of the traps, rings like music in his ears. 

Gun clubs in almost every city of this country will be the headquarters for this war's veterans. 

Better improve your own skill now. Be ready to compete at the traps with the man who has 
worn the khaki. 

Just'out-of'the'service'men and men in every walk of life, keep up your shooting. If there is no 
gun club in your town, start one. We'll tell you how. 

Sporting Powder Division 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS &- COMPANY 



ESTABLISHED 1802 



WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Plants, Warehouses, and Sales Offices in principal business centers 

The Principal du Pont Products are : 



Explosives: Industrial, Agricultural and sporting. Chemicals: Pyroxylin Solutions, Ethers, Bronzing Liquids. 
Coal Tar Distillates, Commercial Acids, Alums, etc. Leather Substitutes: Fabnkoid Upholstery, Rayntite 
Top Material, Fairfield Rubber Cloth. Pyroxylin Plastics: Ivory, Shell and Transparent Py-ra-lin, Py-ra-lin 
Specialties, Challenge Cleanable Collars and Cuffs. Paints and Varnishes: For Industrial and Home Uses. 
Pigments and Colors in Oil: For Industrial Uses. Lithopone : For Industrial Uses. Stains, Fillers, 
Lacquers and Enamels: For Industrial and Home Uses. Dyestuffs: Coal Tar Dyestuffs and intermediates 

For full information address: Advertising Division, E. I. du Pont de Nemours tr Co., Wilmington, Delaware. 






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THE GAME BREEDER 



Trap Shooting Becomes 

or \Vorla~wiae Importance 




Xh VERY man who makes trap shooting one of his recreations thereby 
■^"* contributes hoth to his own pleasure ana success in lire ana to the 
success ana security of his country. 

1 he present great world demand for American leadership raises this long 

popular pastime of virile Americans to greater-than-ever importance. 

What or the trap shooting club in your community? Is it up and doing? 

Is your local dealer one or the 82,704 live merchants who sell the most popular trap guns and shells 
Remington UMC ? 

Our bervice Department will he glad to hear from you and to assist in every -way it can. 

Gun Club Secretaries — Write at once to our Service Department for blank 
registration card for Remington UMC free service to trap shooting clubs. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest JVlanufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the V^orld 

WOOL WORTH BUILDING NEW YORK 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XV 



APRIL, J919 



NUMBER 1 



Co} 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



Game in Wyoming. 

The State Game Warden has issued a 
handsome illustrated report labeled 
"Wyoming's Wild Game." It is an able, 
truthful document and properly suggests 
an end to field sports until 1925. We 
are told that "the game of our State has 
not been holding its own the past year 
and that it is certain some changes must 
be mjade in our laws. * * * We 
must appropriate more funds for hay ; 
we must provide more range for the elk, 
although this will meet with strong op- 
position from the cattlemen, especially in 
Lincoln County." 

Here, as everywhere, the question of 
land ownership must be considered. If 
the elk lands are owned by the State and 
the State decides to make a public shoot- 
ing ground, like the Adirondack Park 
in New York, well and good the cattle- 
men must herd their cattle on other pub- 
lic lands or on their own ranges. The 
great Yellowstone Park is an excellent 
ground for elk during part of the year. 
When the animals go out of the park, if 
they visit and damage farmers or ranch- 
men the owners of the land should have 
the right to destroy them. As soon as 
the State provides public parks for public 
shooting and grants the owners of farms 
the right to have elk and other game for 
sport or for profit or not to have them 
because they wish to have something else, 
either farm crops or domestic animals, 
the whole subject will be settled for all 
time, a simple statute regulating the tak- 
ing of wild game can be enacted and it 
will not be necessary to change the game 
laws every season. 

Restocking Ranges. 

The Wyoming warden well says: 
"From our experience in past years it is 



foolish to try to restock ranges with elk. 
They invariably become a nuisance to the 
farmers in the re-stocked areas, and the 
State will find the claims for damages 
against it entirely too much to justify the 
income. This year we have been com- 
pelled to order seven head of elk killed 
in Crook County, and are disposing of 
the entire Careyhurst herd. It is very 
seldom that any of these herds increase 
to any extent owing to the fact that we 
cannot afford to keep a warden with 
them. Let a man steal a cow and it is 
reported to the authorities at once, but 
an elk — that's different; that's State 
property and it doesn't make any differ- 
ence about the value." 



Fish Losses. 

The warden says at present we are 
loosing a great percentage of our fish in 
the irrigation ditches which are taken out 
of trout streams. Some screen must be 
adopted. 



Antelope and Deer. 

"Antelope are not increasing in any 
district. Therefore there should be no 
open season on them, and as under the 
present law the season would open at the 
time of the big game season this year, I 
would advise that this law be continued 
in effect until 1925." 

At the date named it surely will be nec- 
essary to recommend an extension of the 
closed season. Since the antelope is a 
plains animal easily seen and shot by 
those who destroy the elk, the in- 
creasing population soon will put an end 
to the antelope except on big ranches 
where they will be properly looked after 
when it pays to do so. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Antelope Breeding. 

The laws of many States which permit 
deer breeding might be applied to ante- 
lope in Wyoming and if publicity be given 
to the fact the antelope are very valua- 
ble for sport and for food they quickly 
can be made and kept plentiful. Some 
of our readers now sell a good lot of 
deer every year to State game officers 
who turn them out in places where the 
public can shoot. A few big antelope 
ranches in Wyoming easily can be made 
to supply the Wyoming warden with ani- 
mals to be liberated for the public to 
shoot provided the State maintains pro- 
per public shooting grounds. The ante- 
lope would not be worth much to the 
public on posted farms. The deer are 
said to be increasing in a few districts. 
In other districts there is quite a short- 
age. The Game Breeder suggests that 
some profitable deer ranches are needed 
to supply breeding stock and an abundant 
food. 

Mountain Sheep and Buffalo. 

The sheep are reported to be increas- 
ing but hard to locate in very inaccessible 
places. I hardly think, the warden says, 
there has been to exceed twenty-five 
head killed in the State the past season. 

The buffalo enclosed in the State Re- 
serve are doing well. A warden at Cody 
reports about fifty head of wild buffalo 
on the Hoodoo Game Preserve which no 
doubt escaped from the park. 

Game Birds. 

Sage chickens "are getting very scarce. 
* * * There is not one of our war- 
dens who has not reported a shortage of 
chickens this year. * * * The auto- 
mobile places the chickens at the mercy 
of the hunters. There should be closed 
seasons in various counties. Very few 
grouse are killed and there are very few 
in the State. Ducks and geese under the 
migratory bird law have increased to a 
great extent." 

"There are very few quail in the State. 
A few may be found in the Platte Valley 
near the Nebraska line. As they are 
fully protected they are supposed to be 
increasing. However, owing to climatic 
conditions this is very doubtful. The 
closed season should be extended to 1925. 



The pheasants have decreased instead of 
increased and they are not a success in 
this State. I think it would be foolish 
to spend any more money trying to stock 
districts of the State with them. They 
can, however, be raised in captivity, even 
in the high altitudes. One man in the 
neighborhood of Dubois has been very 
successful raising themi. The closed sea- 
son should be extended to 1925. 

"It is a proven fact that more damage 
is done to the game and game birds of 
this State by predatory animals than 
from all other sources." 



Game Ranches Needed. 

It is very evident that some good big 
ranches for game with gamekeepers in 
charge are needed in Wyomiing. These 
would be very profitable under liberal 
laws. Some, no doubt, would entertain 
sportsmen at reasonable prices. All 
would supply an abundance of stock ani- 
mals, game birds and eggs for propaga- 
tion purposes. The markets would be 
kept full of cheap food. The State 
Game Warden could get all the game 
needed to turn down on public shooting 
grounds. 

The warden's report closes with the 
sportsman's creed : "Obey the laws and 
work for better laws ;" which in Wyo- 
ming would seem to miean quit shooting 
game birds until 1925 and meantime 
work for more laws. We think the peo- 
ple would do well to. consider the game 
breeder's creed : "More game and fewer 
game laws," and to work for a big lot of 
game, good shooting during long open 
seasons beginning now and plenty of 
game for the people to eat. 

State game officers who take pride in 
seeing a big lot of game produced in their 
States are modern and up to date. State 
game officers who discourage and pre- 
vent game breeding soon will ascertain 
that the sportsmen have little or no 
shooting and the people who are said to 
own the game never have any to eat. 



The Appetite for Legislation 

Our readers will be glad to hear, no 
doubt, that more space will be given in 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the future to the methods of game breed- 
ing than to the reform of the game laws. 
Enough States now permit and encour- 
age the profitable breeding of game to 
enable us to predict that America soon 
will be the biggest game producing coun- 
try in the world. States which continue 
to place desirable food birds on the song 
bird list and which rely on closed seasons 
for terms of years, in the hope that some 
day the game will come back, will be 
regarded as sadly behind the times ; the 
abundant game produced in other States 
will pass through them to the States 
where there is more freedom. Game de- 
partments which arrest food producers 
may expect to be abolished. 

The appetite for legislation still re- 
mains abnormal in States which have 
many game protective associations and it 
is evident that this appetite is encour- 
aged by those who profit by the game law 
industry. The absurd list of new laws 
offered annually in States like Pennsyl- 
vania and some others has, however, at- 
tracted the attention of some prominent 
statesmen and it seems likely that a good 
part of the laws introduced will not be 
enacted and that possibly some of the 
most backward States may soon decide 
that the game laws do not produce satis- 
factory sport or any food for the people. 
They may learn the reason why they do 
not and cannot produce good results. 
Meantime the breeders in the free 
States will produce a tremendous amount 
of game and our readers will be told 
how they do it. 

Game Law Outrages. 

We shall continue to make brief men- 
tion of the game law outrages as they 
may be reported by our readers or other- 
wise. It has been well said that the way 
to bring about the repeal of a bad law 
is to execute or enforce it and we have 
observed that our comemnt about the 
arrest of people for having stock birds or 
eggs in their possession for breeding pur- 
poses and for selling game and eggs 
often has brought about a change in the 
laws. 

The Wrong State. 

A Washington warden writing to say 



that the "Oregon Outrage" reported (the 
arrest and fining of a breeder because he 
killed one of his golden pheasants) was 
not an Oregon outrage but a Washing- 
ton outrage. The officer claims that he 
made the arrest because the owner had 
no right under the law to kill his bird 
and to have it mounted ; but he frankly 
says the laws require considerable re- 
pairs, or words to that effect. We gladly 
credit the outrage to Washington and 
apologize to Oregon. The young man 
who handled the . survey containing the 
report had a big mail before him includ- 
ing some Oregon matters and he was 
under the impression the breeder men- 
tioned in a telegram to a newspaper was 
one of our Oregon members. The news- 
paper clipping did not say where the 
outrage occurred. The golden pheasant 
owned by the criminal was an aviary spe- 
cies, not a game bird, and the laws pro- 
tecting the vanishing game of Washing- 
ton should not be enforced so' as to make 
it not worth while to own aviary birds 
which are reared and kept in aviaries by 
their owners. It would be quite as pro- 
per to arrest the owner of a peacock or 
a barnyard fowl as to arrest owners of 
aviary pheasants. In many States these 
birds now are reared and sold as freely 
as peacocks, parrots and canaries are, 
and the intelligent game wardens never 
think of interfering with the industry. 



Sed Outlook in California. 

The California state report tells us 
few people take an interest in game 
breeding in that state. 

This is not surprising considering the 
attitude of the department towards the 
new food and sport producing industry. 
Starting with a fine of $25 for each per- 
son who wishes to experiment (this has 
been reduced we believe) and threaten- 
ing such capable breeders as Miss Mary 
Rahlman and others with $800 fines be- 
cause they had breeding birds in pos- 
session is a poor way to encourage game 
breeding. The report says the experi- 
mental game farm will be abandoned and 
we fail to find a word about the desira- 
bility of game breeding, its methods and 
profits either in the report or in the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



elaborate magazine, issued by the state 
department during the year. The com- 
mission thinks the people prefer poultry 
and poultry rearing. 

If California will open the San Fran- 
cisco markets to game produced by our 
members in Oregon, Washington and 
some other states for one season and will 
give us a little notice in advance we 
will guarantee to flood the market with 
game for the people to eat; and the re- 
sult will be that our members referred 
to will have more game than ever since 
they will re-invest the proceeds of the 
sales. 

If the commission does not want any 
game produced in the state it would be 
a good plan to open the markets to 
game produced in other states. The 
people will enjoy the food ; our readers 
who produce game in more civilized 
states will be glad to have the money. 

California can go on in its old-fash- 
ioned, sleepy way of protecting game if 
it wishes to do so; a large number of 
politicians (they should stop interfering 
with producers) can be kept on the pay- 
roll of those unproductively employed 
and the people, we are sure, will enjoy 
eating the food our readers in other 
states will sell them, A new lot of game 
officers can be specially employed to in- 
spect and identify the food and see that 
no citizen of California has had any 
hand in the breeding business. Our read- 
ers will stand all the. expense for the 
new army of game protectors no matter 
what political party they may belong 
to. We are non-partisan in such matters. 

We saw a letter recently which was 
written by a California state senator in 
which he says that a law passed recently 
was reconsidered since it prevented 
pheasant breeding. How about the laws 
preventing quail breeding for sport and 
for food? Will the California commis- 
sion sleep right through the more game 
and fewer game laws movement? 

Those who are opposed to field sports 
and go in for preventive laws should re- 
member that shooting is the big induce- 
ment to production. Why should the 
game protection societies claim to favor 
game breeding and also seek to destroy 
the inducement. 



Since it is safe to say that five or 
ten cartridges are shot for every bird 
bagged and more at the preserves which 
have trap shooting also it is evident that 
our readers use a vast amount of am- 
munition. Some places use mpre than a 
country store. We trust they all use the 
kind advertised and we believe they do 
since they are interested in seeing more 
game and fewer game laws and are will- 
ing to purchase from those who help 
the cause. 



The game conservation society con- 
templates starting a school for game 
keepers on one of its experimental farms. 
There is a big demand in America for 
skilled labor on game farms and pre- 
serves at attractive wages. The new in- 
dustry promises to furnish agreeable em- 
ployment for thousands of young men in 
the country and many farmers, no doubt, 
soon will learn that it is desirable to 
have game as a farm asset and to em- 
ploy some one who knows how to pro- 
duce it and to look after it properly. 



The society also has been considering 
the idea of starting a shooting school 
where young men can learn how to shoot 
game flying. Trap shooting is inter- 
esting and desirable, but the best place 
to learn to shoot game is in the field 
where game is plentiful. 

No one can expect to learn to shoot 
flying in places where it is only legal to 
shoot three cock pheasants in a year and 
with the chance of the bag limit being re- 
duced it hardly seemis worth while to 
own a gun and certainly it is not worth 
while to own a dog. 



Readers who have not tried advertis- 
ing in The Game Breeder should do so. 
They surely will receive an interesting 
mail and get in touch with some good 
customers. 



The more we think about it the more 
we think it is a good plan to have "more 
game and fewer game laws." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



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View on Amston Lake 



THE AUDUBON SOCIETIES AND GAME FARMING. 

By T. Gilbert Pearson. 
Photographs by Herbert K. Job. 



The National Association of Audubon 
Societies approving strongly of game 
propagation, has for several years been 
actively encouraging the practice. It 
has done much pioneer work in the publi- 
cation of literature giving practical in- 
struction in these methods, and operates 
a game-farm and experiment station. 

Owing to the growing interest and 
many inquiries about the subject, in 1914 
we were led to establish our DEPART- 
MENT OF APPLIED ORNITHOL- 
OGY, in charge of Herbert K. Job, well 
known for his writings, researches, and 
photographs of wild birds and game. 

The evident need of practical, visible 
demonstration of details of method of 
propagating game and attracting and 
conserving wild bird life soon led us to 
look for a suitable tract of land on which 
to carry out our ideals. Realization of 
this began when Charles M. Ams, Esq., 
of New York City, offered the use of his 
great tract of land at Amston, in eastern 
Connecticut. This estate embraces three 



or four square miles of picturesque coun- 
try, the natural haunt of wild game and 
of abounding wild bird life, and includes 
a fine, large lake, ponds, and streams. 

Under the management of Mr. Job, 
from small beginnings we have now, as- 
sisted by a group of prominent residents 
of Connecticut, organized as "The Ams- 
ton Game Club," built up a considerable 
game-farm enterprise, employing as 
resident game-keeper one of the most 
widely experienced professionals in this 
country, Robert K. McPhail, formerly 
game-keeper to King Edward of Eng- 
land at Windsor Castle. We have 
equipped a pheasant-rearing venture, be- 
sides continuing and enlarging our propa- 
gation work with native wild ducks of a 
dozen or more species, the quail work, 
with the Bob-white and California Val- 
ley Quail, and the experiment with na- 
tive wild doves and pigeons, particularly 
the Mourning Dove. 

In order to make Amston a center of 
interest in all practical methods with bird 



10 



THE GAME BREEDER 



life, realizing that the great traffic in 
canaries raised in Germany has been cut 
off by the war, and that there may be a 
real opportunity for a new and growing 
American industry, we have encouraged 
a man possessing the requisite knowledge 
to start there an experiment of breeding 
canaries for the market on a commercial 
scale. This is now in operation, and, if 
successful, may lead to further aviary 
work. We plan also to add certain other 
lines of research. 

This work at Amston keeps always 
in view the instruction of the public, and 
in this follows two main lines. The first 
is through experiment and demonstration, 
to ascertain all possible methods of in- 
creasing the abundance of birds and game 



walking distance from the depot, but 
people interested in the work are en- 
couraged to come, are shown the work, 
and have their questions answered. 
Further, at the AMSTON INN, right on 
the grounds, they will be accommodated 
comfortably as long as they may care to 
remain. 

Not only may people come informally 
at any time, but definite periods of syste- 
matic instruction, in personal charge of 
Mr. Job, have been arranged. For the 
Summer of 1919 there will be two in- 
struction periods, of three weeks each. 
The first, from July 5 to 25, Will offer a 
course in each of the following subjects: 
(a) Field Ornithology; (b) Applied 
Ornithology, including elementary game 




Young Canvasbacks and Redheads raised at Amston, 1918.— 3 Months old. 



in America, and to publish the results. 
The second is corollary to it, to give op- 
portunity to the public to study these 
methods in actual operation. Most real 
game-farms are rather inaccessible. In 
some cases publicity is not especially de- 
sired, the methods employed being in a 
way business secrets. But even if visitors 
were welcome, it would be only for a 
brief survey, and there would be no 
facilities for remaining on the premises 
for any serious study. At Amston, how- 
ever, not only is the place accessible by 
railroad and automobile, and the game- 
farm and experimental work within easy 



propagation; (c) Nature Photography, 
both plate and motion pictures. Also 
there will be illustrated lectures by spe- 
cialists. This will be immediately fol- 
lowed by another three weeks' term, 
from July 26 to August 15, in Commer- 
cial and Practical Game Farming, with a ' 
view to preparing people to raise game 
for profit or other purpose, or to fitting 
for employment on game-farms, pre- 
serves, or estates. At the conclusion of 
the formal instruction students may re- 
main as long as they wish to observe the 
methods on the game-farm, or may re- 
turn at any time to watch subsequent 
stages. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



11 



The AUDUBON HOUSE, headquar- 
ters of this Association, with its collec- 
tions of bird specimens and reference 
library of Nature books, will be open to 
visitors from about the latter part of 
May till late autumn. Circulars giving 
full details and terms may be had by 
addressing our New York office, or, bet- 
ter, direct to Herbert K. Job, 291 Main 
Street, West Haven, Conn. 

In reference to the matter of the game- 
breeding operations, we expect important 



the Canvasback. His winter feeding 
method is based upon Nature, taking into 
account the fact that the wild fowl mi- 
grate south to locations abounding in 
aquatic vegetation and small life, where 
they feed up into prime physical con- 
dition. Beginning, then, not later than 
early January, he feeds intensively for 
tgg production, besides using grain, giv- 
ing plenty of vegetable and animal mat- 
ter. His staple morning feed is raw 
vegetables, such as small potatoes, 




Brood of California Valley Quail raised at Amston. 



results this present season. Last season, 
among other work, we raised broods of 
young Wood Duck, Redhead, and Can- 
vasback, with hardly the loss of a bird. 
This was attributed to great care and 
cleanliness in feeding, using only freshly 
prepared food, never allowing any of it 
to lie about and sour, also to having 
plenty of lettuce and clean sand, and 
occasional feeds of chopped angleworms. 

The main problem in the propagation 
of our native wild ducks other tnan Mal- 
lards is to make them produce eggs. A 
proper place and stimulating winter feed- 
ing are the two main essentials. In this 
province our Keeper, Mr. McPhail, has 
had excellent success, even in breeding 



mangles, or other kinds, chopped up fine, 
scalded, and mixed with a rich mash, 
including plenty of beef or fish scrap, 
also occasionally some leaf vegetation, 
such as kale, celery or other tops or 
sprouts, sprouted oats, cabbage, &c. The 
evening feed is of mixed grain, especially 
cracked corn, wheat, and barley. 

We winter the ducks in an aquatic 
house, described in The Game Breeder 
December, 1916, built out in the pond, 
with large frame windows, a platform 
with litter where they may feed and dry 
themselves, and a large, deep swimming- 
pool which never freezes even in severe 
weather, though without artificial heat. 
This winter we have not lost a bird, 



12 



THE GAME BREEDER 



though it is proverbially hard to winter 
diving ducks. They are all in splendid 
condition, and give every indication of 
early breeding. 

In the quail work we find that it is 
easy to rear the young to .maturity, using 
bantams, feeding lightly, and giving 
range on fresh grass in a large fenced 



much in the shade, to avoid lung 
troubles. In feeding, the safest method 
is to provide an area of chopped straw 
litter, scattering the food in this, to keep 
them working for it, and not giving more 
than what they will clean up thoroughly. 
About every two weeks this litter should 
be replaced by fresh. Though they do 




Brood of Wood Ducks, raised at Amston 



-enclosure. We now keep the hens in the 
coops, allowing the young to roam at 
will. Each coop has a pile of brush in 
front of it for shade. The young when 
small keep closely in the vicinity. Later 
they fly over the fence and feed in ad- 
jacent grain-fields or gardens, but return 
at night to stay near the hen, though 
usually outside the coop, often in an 
adjoining thicket. The real and vital 
problem is to keep them year after year 
in condition still to produce eggs. The 
tendency is, after one breeding, to lay 
few eggs the following season, and these 
less fertile, and then to peter out com- 
pletely. 

With a little bunch of California Val- 
ley Quails, which we raised here, we are 
trying the experiment of keeping them, 
pinioned, in the large enclosure around 
the duck pond, with plenty of room to 
range all winter. They stand the cold 
perfectly, having plenty to eat, and have 
come through to spring in seemingly the 
best of health. We have found that, in 
keeping quail penned, it is well to give 
them plenty of room, and important that 
the ground be well drained and not too 



well for a while if fed in hoppers, there 
is great danger that they become sluggish 
and develop liver trouble. 

Game farming has now reached a stage 
where the practice begins to rest on solid 
foundation, though there is yet plenty of 
rooim for further experiment and dis- 
covery. Despite the fact that in the 
past it sometimes has proven to be an 
expensive amusement, there are certainly 
now an increasing number of people who 
are beginning to realize profits from the 
business. The thing now is to get the 
effort as quickly as possible upon a sound 
paying basis, like any other industry, and 
then its full success is assured. Every 
additional person who can make gamie- 
f arming pay is another source of strength 
to the whole movement. It will be our 
hope and purpose at Amston at least to 
make the work pay for itself, the main 
tried-out lines sustaining the research 
part, which may yet be experimental. 

Having stayed at Amston, I am greatly 
pleased with the outlook there, and can 
recommend it as a most fascinating place 
to spend holidays or a vacation. The 
country abounds in bird-life, and the lake 



THE GAME BREEDER 



13 



is like one in the wilds of the Adiron- 
dacks. Besides being a lover of birds, 
I confess to being an enthusiastic fisher- 
man. It has been a long, long time since 
I had such sport with the rod as I had 
last Summer at Amston Lake ! We want 
to make it a rendezvous for lovers of 
birds, game, and unsullied Nature, and I 



can heartily commend it as such. And 
further, it will always be a pleasure to us 
to fraternize and co-operate with the 
members of THE GAME CONSER- 
VATION SOCIETY, and of all other 
organizations which have likewise at 
heart the conservation of the wild birds 
and game of America. 



WILD TURKEY NOTES. 

By Caton and McIlhenney. 



It is quite an easy matter to breed a 
good lot of wild turkeys but often, if 
held up too closely, they become quite 
tame, too tame for sport in fact, and if 
kept wild and on a big range many will 
be lost to vermin and poachers. The}* 
are well worth having, however, and 
since on suitable ground containing nat- 
ural foods it does not cost much to feed 
them the loss of some birds is not a very 
serious matter. 

The late Judge Caton of Illinois 
(whose son was a classmate of the editor 
of The Game Breeder at Yale) raised 
many wild turkeys and made a long se- 
ries of observations of birds which he 
kept in confinement. "At various times," 
he says, "he sent in all about forty wild 
turkeys to California in the hope that it 
may be acclimatized in the forests. Their 
numerous enemies have thus far pre- 
vented success in this direction." 

It would be necessary to turn down a 
very large number of turkeys on a place 
where their natural enemies are not con- 
trolled in order to be sure of the birds 
becoming established. It is a well known 
*ule of game preserving that where only 
a few birds are liberated in a place where 
their enemies are superabundant the ene- 
mies will get themi all. 

It is wise to thoroughly trap a place 
where turkeys are to be introduced be- 
fore the birds are turned down in the 
wood and a beat keeper should be kept 
on the ground to see that the enemies of 
the game do not destroy it. 

At the Wading River Preserve of the 
Game Breeders Association wild turkeys 



were reared in captivity or under control 
in rearing fields, and also the birds bred 
in a wild state. The keepers had, how- 
ever, all they could do with the pheasants 
and ducks and the wild turkeys after a 
few were shot disappeared. Some were 
taken by vermin. Some were shot out- 
side the preserve. 

The experiment indicated that wild 
turkeys easily can be bred both in cap- 
tivity and in a wild state but the neces- 
sity for looking after them properly in 
order to preserve them was very evident. 

Mr. E. A. Mcllhenny in his excellent 
book, "The Wild Turkey and Its Hunt- 
ing," says: "There are thousands of 
acres in the South which were once cul- 
tivated, but which are now abandoned 
and growing up with timber, brush and 
grass, such country affords splendid op- 
portunity for the rearing and perpetu- 
ation of the wild turkey. These lands 
are vastly superior for this purpose than 
are the solid primeval forests, inasmuch 
as they afford a great variety of summer 
food, such as green, tender herbage, ber- 
ries of many kinds, grasshoppers by the 
million and other insects in which tur- 
keys delight. Such a country also af- 
fords good nesting retreats, with briar 
patches and straw where the nest may be 
safely hidden, and where the young birds 
may secure safe hiding places from ani- 
mals and birds of prey; but alas! not at 
present from trappers, baiters and pot 
hunters. Check these and the abandoned 
plantations of the South would soon be 
alive with turkeys." 

Mr. Mcllhenny might well have added 



14 



THE GAME BREEDER 



that the turkeys will cost very little to 
raise and will sell for $20 each, and that 
thousands of quail easily can be produced 
on the same ground worth $24 per dozen. 
Under proper laws permitting and en- 
couraging food production and sport the 
abandoned plantations easily can be made 
to yield an annual revenue larger than 
some of them can be bought for to-day. 
But no one will engage in the industry 
so long as the laws prohibit the producer 
from shooting his game or marketing it 
alive and dead. New York alone will 
send hundreds of thousands of dollars 
annually to the owners of these aban- 
doned and worthless plantations as soon 
as the laws are made right and the State 
game departments encourage the owners 
to produce the most profitable crop which 
can be produced on such places. 

On some of the North Carolina pre- 
serves, where thousands of quail are 
raised and shot every year many wild 
turkeys breed in a wild state. The 
writer saw one nesting by a stump in 
a field where a farmer was plowing 
and he left a lot of grass and stubble 
about the stump because it paid to do 
so. The sportsman who produced the 



game paid all the farmers taxes on lands 
and buildings and often something extra 
for good measure. A skilled gamekeeper 
controlled the enemies of the turkeys and 
other game and also saved the farmer's 
chickens from the hawks and other ver- 
min. 

As soon as the laws are made right in 
the South there will be many game 
ranches where the game will be worth 
more than the land now is ; there will be 
many preserves where game is produced 
for sport and we predict there will be 
many resorts where sportsmen can go 
and find good shooting and comfortable 
quarters. It seems absurd to keep on 
making laws which cannot possibly save 
the upland game if no one looks after it 
properly, especially if such laws destroy 
the value of the plantations referred to 
by Mr. Mcllhenny. 

There is plenty of room in our vast 
country for every one who wishes to do 
so to have game and those who cannot 
afford to have game without selling some 
of it should be encouraged to produce 
the food and sell it to those who like to 
eat game. 



BREEDING WILD FOWL. 



By D. W. Huntington. 



Readers of The Game Breeder know 
how difficult and, I may add, how dan- 
gerous it was a few years ago to pro- 
cure wild fowl for breeding purposes. 
The protective laws, intended to save the 
vanishing game from extinction, were 
executed against those who wished to 
secure breeding stock and eggs in order 
to restore the birds to places where they 
no longer occurred and to make them 
and keep them plentiful for sport and 
for food. Numerous arrests were made 
and heavy fines were imposed on all who 
traped wild clucks and other fowl for 
breeding purposes and a promising food 
and sport producing industry was pre- 
vented. The Game Breeder by giving 
publicity to outrageous arrests made it 
easy to have the laws amended. 



When I first became interested in wild 
duck breeding I purchased my eggs and 
ducks in England. Unfortunately at this 
time the English game farmers had been 
infusing domestic blood with the idea 
that they could produce a duck which 
was easier to pen and manage and they 
thought the larger size of the birds would 
appeal to their patrons. 

The result was that they produced 
many ducks which were not strong 
enough on the wing to provide sport and 
which often refused to fly. 

For the most part the wild ducks 
which were obtained by many of the 
shooting clubs in America came from 
places which had procured their stock 
birds and eggs in England. The Ruther- 
ford Stuyvestant preserves at Allamuchy, 



THE GAME BREEDER 



15 



"New Jersey, and our Game Breeders' 
Association at Wading River, Long Is- 
land, N. Y., were responsible for the dis- 
tribution of many birds and eggs which 
were not as good as they should be for 
the reason above stated. Upon the pub- 
lication of my book, "Our Wild Fowl 
and W'aders," and numerous articles 
about breeding wild ducks for sport 
and for profit the industry of breed- 
ing wild fowl grew rapidly ; there was 
a big demand for ducks and for eggs 
and many green-heads of the western 
barn yards, which had become common 
domesticated fowl, were utilized by 
breeders who advertised and sold birds 
and eggs, which often were worthless 
for sport and no better than tame ducks 
for food. 

Numerous complaints came to The 
Game Breeder about the character and 
sporting behavior of the fowl and the 
numerous articles about "near mallards" 
and the advice to secure true wild ducks 
for breeding purposes caused a big de- 
mand for trapped birds which could not 
be supplied legally. 

In our experimental work I learned 
that the introduction of some wild drakes 
to the flocks of "near mallards" soon re- 
sulted in the production of birds which 
could and did fly well and those who let 
some of their birds breed wild in the 
marshes surrounding their ponds soon 
had the satisfaction of showing ducks 
which were as strong on the wing as the 
true wild birds. 

The U. S. Biological Survey has recog- 
nized the importance of trapping wild 
fowl for breeding purposes and under 
liberal regulations now issues permits to 
game breeders to take birds and eggs 
ind to sell them to other breeders hold- 
ing permits. The trapped birds can not 
be sold as food but any birds bred on 
the game farms and preserves can be 
marketed provided the young birds be 
branded on one foot with a V-shaped 
mark. 

Our readers will remember the regu- 
lation requiring that in order to sell such 
birds as food they must be killed, "other- 
wise than by shooting," and the prompt 
protest of The Game Breeder to such a 
regulation as being in violation of the 



Section of the law, protecting game 
breeders and preserve owners, which was 
added just before the law was enacted. 
The Survey quickly saw that our objec- 
tion was well m<ade and the regulation 
promptly was repealed. 

Shooting, of course, is a great induce- 
ment to production and the U. S. Con- 
gress was well aware of this fact when 
it amended the migratory bird law, as 
The Game Breeder suggested, so as to 
encourage the breeding of wild fowl not 
only on game farms but also on pre- 
serves, "in order to increase our food 
supply.'" 

Readers of The Game Breeder who 
are breeding or who wish to breed wild 
fowl for sport or for profit are advised 
to write to Dr. Nelson, Chief of the U. S. 
Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, 
for permits to trap and breed wild fowl 
and I would advise them to ask for in- 
structions about the branding of the 
birds which will be sent to market after 
they are shot. The Game Breeder has 
asked for this information and will pub- 
lish it. The permits cost nothing. The 
regulations are now fairly simple and 
reasonable and the result already is a 
lively interest and much activity in the 
wild fowl breeding industry. 

Wild ducks are the easiest game birds 
to breed on farms and preserves. Any 
small pond or stream can be utilized for 
breeding wild fowl. Marshy ponds with 
some natural wild duck foods growing 
in and around them, are the best, of 
course, but almost any water can be 
made to yield some wild ducks and some 
good shooting. My earliest experiment 
was made on a small place, just big 
enough for a garden, and a few fruit 
trees. My pond was a wash tub sunk 
in the ground and kept full of water, 
Here I successfully reared many wild 
ducks which spent much of their time on 
a bay several miles away. Some of the 
American game farmers now have good 
sized ponds and lakes with excellent 
feeding ground for the ducks and some 
soon will be prepared to furnish many 
thousands of eggs and young birds an- 
nually. The old "shoots' where thou- 
sands of "near mallards" were shot every 
season now are planning to have more 



16 



THE GAME BREEDER 



lively birds to shoot ; many new game 
shooting clubs are being started and 
many more will be as soon as it becomes 
generally known how easy it is to have 
excellent duck shooting. Numerous in- 
quiries come to The Game Breeder from 
people who contemplate starting com- 
mercial game farms and some of these 
places will use mammoth incubators and 
be prepared to sell many thousands of 
, excellent wild ducks every season. Some 
stories about these places will be pub- 
lished during the year. 

Since many advertisers in The Game 
Breeder supply thousands of pheasant 
eggs and the common "near mallards" 
and their eggs were in great demand it 
is evident that the demand for trapped 
wild ducks and for the young ducks and 
eggs will be tremendous. The fact that 
it no longer is criminal to produce food 
on the game farms and preserves and the 
repeal of the restrictive law preventing 
the trapping of stock birds, warrant my 
saying that America in a very few years 
will be the biggest wild fowl producing 
country in the world. The State game 
departments should supply wild ducks 
and eggs to those who will engage in the 
new industry, just as agricultural de- 
partments supply seeds to those who will 
multiply them. Numerous game shoot- 
ing clubs quickly can be organized to 
utilize waste lands, containing ponds and 
marshes where no wild fowl are ever 
seen, and the result of such activity will 
be highly creditable to the departments 
and highly beneficial to the shooting on 
all public waters and marshes. The 
amount of food sent to market will make 
the State departments popular with all 
of the people and the sportsmen will be 
surprised at the improvement of their 
sport during long open seasons. The 
best State departments will show the best 
results. 

Wild fowl, under the new regulations, 
are in no danger of being placed in the 
song bird list. 



the State owns a big lot of game pur- 
chased from game breeders who are 
members of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety. 

Those who think the State owns all 
of the game are sadly mistaken. Penn- 
sylvania and other States would hardly 
purchase as much game as they do if the 
State owned it all. We are confident 
that our readers have a very important 
"qualified" ownership in hundreds of 
thousands (possibly millions) of game 
birds and some States, like some clubs, 
find it very handy to buy from the pro- 
ducers. 

The reason the markets are not yet full 
of game is the demand for live birds for 
breeding purposes and the bad shipping 
facilities in some backward States. 



Good Work. 



"The State Owns the Game." 

In Pennsylvania, where a big lot of 
game laws are produced every season, 



We still continue to hear from people 
who have read the booklet of the Her- 
cules Powder Co. on game farming. 
Many seem to have decided the subject 
was interesting and well worth investi- 
gating. Some say they decided to be- 
come game producers after reading the 
booklet and find it pays to have more 
game for sport and for profit. It would 
be interesting to compare the figures 
showing the amount of money expend- 
ed for ammunition for game bird shoot- 
ing on the places where game always is 
abundant and with the figures showing 
the amount expended -for trap shooting. 
We are in favor of both heartily and we 
often observe the traps for trap shooting 
when we visit the places where game 
shooting is the chief sport. 

The game shooting clubs preserves 
and new game farms are the best cus- 
tomers of those engaged in game breed- 
ing. To enact "otherwise than by shoot- 
ing" nonsense would result in depriving 
the game farmers of many customers 
and directly tend to prevent the breeding 
of game on game farms and preserves. 
We would remind mischief mlakers of 
the section which says "nothing in the 
act shall be construed to prevent," etc. 
The section is quite worth while and 
very statesmanlike. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



17 



GROUSE NOTES. 



Big Bags of Grouse. 

Mr. A. J. Stuart Wortley, after citing 
many big bags of grouse, a thousand or 
more birds being shot in a day, says : "I 
do not think any bad consequences have 
followed these rare feats. If they have, 
as is probably the case, stimulated others 
to improve their shooting and the man- 
agement of their moors, they have done 
more good than harm, and merely re- 
sulted in an increase of the supply of 
grouse available as food or sport for 
those who own moorland estates." 

The area suitable for grouse shooting 
in Scotland is very small in comparison 
with the vast prairies and plains in manji 
of our Western States where the prairie 
grouse and sharp-tailed grouse were 
tremendously abundant to say nothing 
about the States Ohio and Kentucky, 
where the grouse have become extinct 
and where they can easily be restored 
when it becomes possible to procure 
grouse and eggs for breeding purposes. 

Audubon described the grouse as a 
pest in Kentucky on account of the dam- 
age done to fruit trees. The grouse to- 
day easily can be made more valuable 
than any fruit and by proper manage- 
ment, using scare boys during the breed- 
ing season, they can be prevented from 
doing any damage. The Game Conser- 
vation Society before long will make it 
possible for grouse breeders to procure 
stock birds and eggs, and those who un- 
dertake grouse breeding will have more 
valuable birds than pheasants and far 
better shooting than pheasant shooting 
is. Why in the name of common sense 
should it be legal to have foreign pheas- 
ants and not American grouse? 



plentiful although the markets be fully 
supplied; to accomplish such results it 
would only be necessary to utilize a very 
small part of the area where grouse are 
extinct or where shooting is prohibited. 
How will sport be damaged by such 
activity? The late Mr. A. A. Hill, for- 
merly vice-president of the Game Conser- 
vation Society, told the writer about a 
good days grouse shooting which he en- 
joyed in Scotland. One day when travel- 
ing he was eating his dinner in a country 
inn, a gentleman who was present asked 
if he was not a stranger in Scotland, 
When he replied that he was from 
America he was asked if he was fond of 
shooting. The grouse season had just 
opened and Mr. Hill said he was invited 
to try the shooting. He said he had not 
come prepared to shoot and had no gun 
with him but the stranger said he could 
supply the gun and the result was an 
agreeable days sport. 

In most of the States in America 
where the grouse still occur the shooting 
is prohibited and sportsmen from 
abroad often wonder that the shooting 
which should make and keep the grouse 
abundant is not permitted and that State 
Game Departments are supported by 
sportsmen in order to prohibit sport in 
the hope that some day the birds will 
come back. Truly said the late dean of 
sportsmen, Charles Hallock, we need "a 
revolution of thought and a revival of 
common sense." Some grouse shooting 
clubs are needed. 



Grouse Shooting in Scotland. 

Although the area for grouse shooting 
is small, as we have observed, many 
Americans were in the habit of going to 
Scotland every season before the war, to 
shoot grouse because grouse shooting has 
been prohibited in America in order to 
"save the game." Shooting not only can 
be made to save the game but to keep it 



Grouse Management. 

The Rev. H. A. Macpherson, writing 
about the grouse in Scotland, says: "If 
we allow the moors to becomje over- 
stocked, we increase the susceptibility of 
the game to the various forms of disease 
which have been clearly exploited by Dr. 
Klein and other scientific workers. But 
the vital question in the management of 
a grouse moor is the maintenance of a 
proper food supply. Grouse are hardy 
fowl and can face wet seasons, not in- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



deed with impunity, yet without seriously 
losing ground. 

On our great prairies and plains where 
wheat and other grain are grown the 
natural foods and covers of the grouse 
are absolutely destroyed. When the 
prairie grass is plowed under the grouse 
have neither cover nor food and during 
a long season before the grain grows they 
are exposed to their natural enemies. The 
arresting of a big lot of sportsmen be- 
cause they shoot without a license will 
not save the grouse. There is more dan- 
ger of the grouse becoming extinct than 
there is of the prairies becoming so over- 
stocked that the birds will suffer from 
the diseases due to overcrowding. 

The owner of a Western wheat farm 
or ranch who will leave a strip of prairie 
grass and wild roses and sunflowers on 
all sides of his fields soon can have a 
crop of grouse that will be more valuable 
than the grain, when, of course, the laws 
are amended so as to provide that it is 
not criminal to produce the food profit- 
ably. 

*■ : — 

Grouse Enemies. 

Dr. Macpherson tells us the next point 
is to supplement a good supply of food 
for the grouse by waging war against its 
four-footed and winged persecutors. 

When a keeper is employed to keep 
down the persecutors the grouse quickly 
become abundant and it is quite neces- 



sary to shoot a big lot of them to prevent 
their becoming too abundant. Any farm- 
er or ranch owner who owns a few 
broods of grouse should easily make the 
birds very abundant and he surely will 
have a valuable lot of birds when it be- 
comes legal to sell grouse and eggs. W T e 
predict it soon will be possible to make 
such sales with as much freedoml as the 
sales of pheasants and eggs now are 
made. The grouse can be bred much 
cheaper than pheasants since they will 
find most of their food at certain sea- 
sons on the areas planted for their pro- 
tection and later they will procure wheat 
and other grains in the stubble after the 
harvest. 

The Game Breeder will supply cus- 
tomers for all the game offered for sale 
at $5.00 per bird and the eggs will sell for 
about twice as much as pheasant eggs. 
Why should it be criminal for a farmer 
to produce grouse profitably? Why 
should „the laws require that the grouse 
must become extinct because their 
natural foods and covers are destroyed 
and the birds and eggs are devoured by 
vermin for the very good reason that it 
does not pay to look after them? 

The answer to the question is that 
some common sense is needed in the 
laws protecting grouse. Dr. Needham, 
of Cornell, well said that the farmer 
should have the right to produce any 
plant or animal on his farm. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Some Fox. 

Mrs. Simpson, widow of the Game 
Keeper of the Long Island Game Breed- 
ers' Association, reported that an im- 
pudent fox came to the opposite end of a 
pheasant pen where she was feeding the 
pheasants and barked at her. 



Long Island Vermin. 

There can be no doubt that Long Is- 
land, N. Y., is abundantly supplied with 
foxes and other vermin, including cats. 
The clubs which destroy vermin and 
keep quail and other birds plentiful not 
only are highly beneficial to the imme- 
diate neighborhood but also to shooting 



grounds, open to the public, which are 
miles away. Many game birds desert 
the preserved areas and since some escape 
their natural enemies and breed on un- 
protected areas the quail shooting safely 
can be kept open for all hands quite near 
New York while it is found necessary 
to stop it in entire states where the 
sportsmen have gone in for more game 
laws than game. 



Vermin Laws. 



The owners of cattle and sheep ranch- 
es are permitted and encouraged to de- 
stroy wolves. They can shoot them and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



19 



poison them and the U. S. Biological 
Survey assists in this work we believe. 

The owners of farms where poultry is 
raised are in the habit of destroying 
foxes, skunks, crows, hawks and other 
vermin when these predacious animals 
are observed destroying poultry and eggs. 

In some states, many if not, all 
skunks, some hawks and other animals 
classed as vermin are protected by laws 
prohibiting the destruction of these ani- 
mals. There are exceptions in many 
laws permitting farmers to destroy ani- 
mals when found taking their poultry or 
damaging their crops. 

Now that game breeding for sport and 
for profit is a big and growing industry 
in America the game breeders should 
have the right to protect their game from 
animals which are observed to destroy it. 
They should have the same freedom 
which ranch owners and farmers have. 

Because the skunks, crows and some 
hawks are said to be beneficial on some 
areas, it should not be illegal to destroy 
them on other areas where they are de- 
cidedly harmful. 

The fact that certain birds destroy 
grasshoppers is not a good reason why 
they should be protected on areas where 
so many game birds are produced for 
food that there are not enough grass- 
hoppers to go round. 

The fact that some predacious animals 
destroy mice is not a good reason why 
they should be protected on areas where 
they sadly interfere with the breeding of 
game birds for food. The land owner 
should and usually does, decide the 
question of the preservation of vermin 
when it is observed destroying his poul- 
try, crops or game, provided he is in- 
terested in producing game. 

Even on State game farms, I am quite 
sure the game keepers are in the habit of 
destroying marsh hawks and some or tne 
smaller hawks, which are classed as 
beneficial, when they are observed taking 
young pheasants. 

It is admitted by naturalists that birds 
which are beneficial and which do not 
destroy much game in places where there 
is little or no game to destroy may ac- 
quire "perveted appetites" and become 
decidedly harmful in places where they 
are tempted by a vast array of young 
game birds on the rearing fields. 



I am quite sure that comparatively few 
people know what the laws protecting 
animals classed as vermin are and that 
many disregard them through ignorance. 
Few people would favor the jailing of a 
farmer because he shot a hawk after it 
had been observed taking a chicken 
daily. 

A simple amendment to the laws miight 
well provide that game breeders be per- 
mitted to destroy any species of vermin 
on their game farms or preserves when 
the vermin is observed taking their game. 
It is evident that game enemies residing 
on game farms and preserves are not 
beneficial to people who may reside else- 
where. They hardly can be expected to 
desert the abundant food spread out be- 
fore them. The landowner should decide 
the fate of such animals. The control of 
migratory hawks and other birds which 
do considerable damage on a game farm 
is a more difficult question. There can 
be no doubt that some of these birds are 
more or less beneficial. They probably 
should not all be destroyed when they 
visit a game farm. Fortunately it is not 
possible or necessary to destroy them all. 
A good rule would be to permit the land 
owner to destroy them when thev are 
observed to be decidedly harmful. Per- 
secution will drive many of them away 
and they will increase in places where 
they are regarded as beneficial and show 
a proper decrease in places where evi- 
dently they are harmful. 

In closely preserved countries where 
game is an abundant and cheap food sup- 
ply there can be no doubt that the good 
results have been brought about by the 
destruction of vermin. Thousands of 
game keepers are kept busy protecting 
the game against its natural enemies so 
that it is evident all vermin is not de- 
stroyed. In England before the war the 
question of closely destroying vermin 
often was discussed and the best senti- 
ment was in favor of only destroying 
such vermin as was known to be more 
harmful than beneficial and to only de- 
stroy "beneficials" when they acquired 
"perverted appetites." The Audubon 
Associations and The Game Conserva- 
tion Society can conduct an educational 
campaign which will be heeded by intelli- 
gent game breeders and it would be safe 



20 



THE GAME BREEDER 



to have the laws protecting vermin 
amended so as to provide that gamle ene- 
mies may be destroyed on game farms 
when they are observed destroying game. 
Here as elsewhere more can be ac- 
complished by the excellent educational 
work of the Audubon Societies and in- 
telligent game preservers than can be ac- 
complished by a multiplicity of laws re- 
lating to skunks and others which surely 
will be changed often and for the most 
part will remain unknown, not observed 
and not executed. I am not one of those 
who believe in the wanton destruction of 
all vermin on suspicion that it may do 
harm. But until the game becomes 
abundant and cheap in the markets we 
surely can spare a good lot of vermin 
when it is observed destroying game. 

Prices. 

The prices of pheasants have kept well 
up and we have had repeated inquiries 
for birds. Live hens sold at four and 
five dollars per bird and cocks brought 
nearly as much in some cases. 

Pheasants sold in the New York mar- 
kets for $2.50 each in large lots. 

We predict that good prices will pre- 
vail during the year since many new 
game shooting clubs and preserves will 
be started. We are kept busy writing 
those who contemplate having shooting. 

Many State game officers purchase 
large numbers of pheasants and eggs and 
since many of the birds liberated are 
taken by vermin and most of the rest are 
shot the State departments will continue, 
no doubt, to be good customers. 

True wild mallards sold for $2 and $3 
each and the "near mallards" were not 
in as great demand as they were when 
nothing else could be had. Early eggs 
are $25 per hundred, late eggs $20 and 
$15 per hundred. 

The Egg Market. 

The egg market seems to be opening 
strong. There is especially a big demand 
for wild duck eggs from true wild mal- 
lards and from "near mallards" guar- 
anteed to be strong on the wing. Pur- 
chasers are insisting more and miore on 
knowing how the birds which lay the 
eggs are handled and if they are used 
for shooting. The "otherwise than by 



shooting" duck and its eggs do not com- 
mand very good prices any more. The 
"otherwise than by shooting" legislative 
nonsense if not checked, would result 
in a small production of not very saleable 
ducks. 

Late Eggs. 

We predict there will be a good de- 
mand for late eggs if the breeders will 
advertise them since some of the places 
will rear late birds as well as early ones. 
Although it is not quite as easy to rear 
late birds as early ones it is evident there 
will be more game where both early and 
late birds are reared and some of the 
shoots have not sufficient equipment to 
rear a very large number of birds at once. 
Late birds come in well for late shooting 
and although we favor putting all of the 
birds on the rearing field at the same 
time when this is possible, we have seen 
some good results produced by two crops, 
early and late. 

Readers who have eggs to sell are re- 
quested to send advertisements so that 
our readers surely will be supplied. 

By all means advertise birds for late 
summer and fall delivery. It is a good 
plan to have the orders in and customers 
waiting for the birds and ready to receive 
them early. 

Early Ducks. 

In England hand-reared duck are shot 
as early as August. We hope some of 
our breeders will be ' able to furnish 
ducks suitable for early sport so that the 
shooting can begin early and run through 
a long open season. We like to see the 
boys have a good shoot before school 
opens. 

Early Shooting. 
There is no danger of State or United 
States ducks being shot on the preserves 
during the last of August and early in 
September since the migrants have not 
arrived at that time. Where the State 
laws permit breeders to shoot their game 
at any time we undestand the State law 
prevails. If we are wrong about this 
we hope the U. S. regulations can be 
made to conform to the State law, "in 
order to increase our food supply." It 



THE GAME BREEDER 



21 



would hardly seem to be a "proper regu- 
lation" to limit a producer and prevent 
him from harvesting an early crop if he 
is enterprising enough to produce it. 
Ducks are big eaters and it would be 
unreasonable to compel an owner to keep 
on feeding his fowls after they have be- 
come big enough to fly well and to ap- 
pear well on the table. Why compel an 
owner to add 50 cents or more to the 
cost of every duck he produces provided 
he desires to save the extra expense by 
harvesting part of his crop early ? 

Unsafe Fields. 

A big lot of penned pheasants, duck 
and other game birds surely will attract 
many game enemies. It is evident that 
that adjacent fields are not very safe for 
quail or other wild breeding birds or even 
for the pheasants when they are liber- 
ated. The game keeper in America has 
a far more difficult work than the keep- 
ers have in countries where there are 
more game farms and preserves. Ver- 
min comes to him from all four sides of 
his ground and in wild regions where 
there is much cover for vermin the won- 
der is that the shooting can be made as 
good as it often is. 

Good Quail Ground. 

The safest and easiest place to make 
and keep quail plentiful is a region of 
closely cultivated farms where there are 
'no large wooded areas or covers for ver- 
min, provided the cultivation of the 
farms be suitable for the game. Wheat 
and other grain farms are the best, of 
course, since the quail thrive in the stub- 
ble. There should, of course, be some 
small covers for the game; hedges and 
briars planted at the boundaries of the 
fields provide excellent cover, nesting 
sites and food at certain seasons of the 
year. Vermin is far miore easily con- 
trolled on cultivated farms than it is on 
areas containing wooded tracts and lands 
which are not tilled. 

Scaled Quail in Connecticut. 

Senator George P. McLean, of Con- 
necticut, writes: ' 

"As to my experience with scaled 
quail I will say that I had very good luck 



hatching and raising the birds four years 
ago. I think ninety per cent, hatched 
and came to maturity. The winter was 
too much for some of them and when 
the spring came and I stopped feeding 
them they went sontewhere and didn't 
return. I don't believe that any of them 
bred. 

The second season we had a poor 
hatch and the few birds that came to 
maturity disappeared and I haven't heard 
anything from them since. 

I have tried bob-whites, scaled quails 
and Hungarian patridge and regretfully 
come to the conclusion that the only bird 
that will stay in northern Connecticut is 
the ruffed grouse. The pheasants which 
I have raised and which I have released, 
clear out as soon as snow comes unless 
they are fed." 

The fact that the experiment with the 
scaled quail was a failure should not 
prevent others from giving these birds a 
trial. They can be procured in large 
numbers from our advertisers and are 
very good to shoot and to eat. It may 
be that it will be found necessary to take 
up the breeding stock and feed it in con- 
finement in the winter. Possibly the birds 
can be carried through the winter by 
using a snow plow and feeding the birds 
on the cleared areas as they feed the 
bob-whites at some of the Long Island 
clubs. One thing is certain that vermin 
is superabundant in most parts of Con- 
necticut, as elsewhere, when compared 
with the few birds which often are used 
for experiments. Hand-reared birds are 
never as well equipped to escape their 
natural enemies as birds bred in a wild 
state are and when only a few hand- 
reared birds are liberated it is probable 
that vermin may take them all, just as 
Darwin says birds will take all the grain 
when only a few plants are planted. 

A small number of bantams or other 
domestic fowls would hardly be expected 
to survive if turned down in Connecticut 
and left to shift for themselves, but 
bantams no doubt can be reared in Con- 
necticut, and I am inclined to believe that 
if they be properly looked after and fed 
in the winter and if proper shelters or 
covers be provided, a wild breeding 
strain of bantams might be established in 
Connecticut. 
Hand reared pheasants have been 



22 



THE GAME BREEDER 



found more difficult to establish as wild 
breeding birds in England than pheasants 
procured from preserves where all the 
game is bred wild are. The Long Island 
Game Breeders Association will experi- 
ment with scaled quail and the result 
will be published in The Game Breeder. 

A Fair Sized Order. 

The secretary of the game commission 
of Pennsylvania reports the purchase, 
since April, 1918, of 163 deer, 87 wild 
turkeys, 6,390 ring-necked pheasants, 200 
rabbits, 60 varying or snowshoe hares, 26 
fox squirrels, 197 Gambel's quail. 

Practically all of this game was sold by 
readers of The Game Breeder. 

The commission ordered 300 deer, 150 
wild turkeys, 12,000 pheasants, 12,850 
pheasant's eggs (7,664 were received), 
1,500 rabbits, 800 hares, 450 fox squir- 
rels, 35,000 bob-white quail and 1,296 
Gambel's quail, but the secretary says, 
"As has always been our experience the 
shippers invariably overestimate the 
number they are actually able to deliver.' 

The secretary should remember there. 
are many private customers who get their 
orders in early, as soon as The Game 
Breeder appears usually. 

Pheasant Business Improving. 

Every one in the game breeding indus- 
try knows that pheasant breeding is 
booming and the prices are highly satis- 
factory. Hundreds of thousands of dol- 
lars now go to the gamie ranches and 
preserves of the states which have liberal 
laws encouraging game breeding. It 
must seem peculiar to the game officers 
of unprogressive states that big checks 
and money orders go continually through 
their states in one direction and big lots 
of desirable food birds pass through the 
state in the other direction, while little 
or no business is done in their jurisdic- 
tion. 

The reason why the pheasants are pro- 
duced abundantly is that the people are 
not arrested for such industry. Quai' 
and grouse can be produced more abun- 
dantly and more cheaply than pheasants 
are when the laws permit the profitable 
production of quail and grouse. 

That the pheasant industry is grow- 
ing is evidenced by the following state- 



ment of the secretary of the Pennsyl- 
vania commission : 

"You will note that the number of ring-neck 
pheasants secured for releasing this spring is 
over twice the number heretofore secured in 
any one year, although some of our most re- 
liable shippers fell down considerably in the 
number they had hoped to supply us. We are 
laying our plans now to secure not less than 
ten thousand (10,000) for this coming year if 
that is possible." 

The state game officers are beginning 
to rely more and more on members of 
our game conservation society to supply 
them with "more gamle." Considering 
the fact that our readers have many 
private customers who pay a little bet- 
ter prices and who must be served first, 
it is evident that America is becoming 
a big game producing country rapidly. 

Reaching Out for Cottontails. 

The Pennsylvania secretary thus com- 
ments on cottontails : 

"Concerning cottontail rabbits, beg to advise 
that we have reached out in all directions in 
an endeavor to secure desirable cottontail rab- 
bits in goodly numbers, but find that the same 
conditions that exist in Pennsylvania prevail 
in many other eastern states, so that this year 
we will not be able to secure cottontail rabbits 
as we had hoped to do. 

"Concerning the order for Snowshoe hares, 
regret to advise that the shipper is having con- 
siderable difficulty in getting these animals to 
us in good shape and it may be that unless 
he is able to get these hares to us in better 
shape we will be compelled to cancel further 
attempts. 

"Concerning the order for Bob-White Quail, 
beg to advise that the order given is a maxi- 
mum of three separate orders." 

Often we have been surprised at the 
scarcity of live rabbits in the markets. 
Since the animals are regarded as a 
nuisance in Kansas and some of the 
other western states we would suggest 
to state officers the importance of is- 
suing bulletins telling their people there 
is a demand for rabbits at good prices. 
Tell them to try an advertisement in 
The Game Breeder and watch results. 
We desire to be helpful to the Pennsyl- 
vania game officers and also to hundreds 
of game shooting clubs whose members 
read the magazine. 

Reaching Out Generally. 

The Pennsylvania secretary evidently 
goes in widely for "more game." He 
says: 



THE GAME BREEDER 



•23 



"In general, we beg to say that we have 
reached out in all directions AND HAVE 
PURCHASED ALL AVAILABLE GAME, 
EITHER BIRDS OR ANIMALS, SUIT- 
ABLE TO OUR STATE THAT COULD 
BE SECURED AT A REASONABLE 
PRICE." 

Many of our readers never knew he 
was in the market for game. 

It would be a good plan for the Penn- 
sylvania and other state officers who 
want "more game" to advertise for it 
in The Game Breeder. Many of our 
members will be glad to sell their game 
after their regular customers are sup- 
plied. Some are prepared to rear ten 
or twenty thousand extra birds if the 
orders are placed in time. Our desire 
to be helpful is evidenced by our giving 
this reading notice of the wants of one 
state free. 

More Game in Maine. 

Mr. R. C. Bullock, manager of the 
Scarboro Beach Game Farm, writes : 

You will be interested to know that I 
have spoken for 202 pair of trapped mal- 
lards, also some green wing teal. We are 
improving our duck pens and putting in 
some large and more secluded pens for 
black duck and teal. 

I shall be in a position to furnish most 
any amount of black duck and mallards, 
teal and wood-duck, also Canada geese, 
some American widgeon (bald pate) and 
the like. Would like to hear from any 
party that is interested. 

Later I an; going to put into forty acres 
some English jack rabbits that I hope 
will multiply so I can put them on the 
market in any number. What do you 
think of the idea? 

The Game Protective Association 
Dinner. 

The game protective association held 
a game conference and dinner March 
4th in Xew York. 

A resolution which stated that in the 
death of Theodore Roosevelt all outdoor 
lovers and conservationists have suf- 
fered a deplorable loss was adopted. 

Mr. Everitt displayed some magic lan- 
tern slides made in Norway and de- 
scribed a moose hunt. Mr. Carl Ackley 
gave his experience with big game in 
Africa, including a fight with a wounded 
leopard. John H. Wallace. Jr., game 



warden for Alabama, favored a treaty 
with Mexico and Central America. 

Wm. L. Finley had some excellent mo- 
tion pictures showing at close range blue 
herons breaking through the shell and 
also some excellent angling pictures. 

Dr. Grinnell, a director of the protec- 
tion society, "who was the first advocate 
of the no-sale of game," told about the 
early shooting on the marshes of Harlem 
River. Mr. Grinnell evidently feels the 
more game and fewer game law breeze 
slightly and has heard some of the abun- 
dant sales of game now made by our 
readers, since "discussing hunting con- 
ditions in the past and for the future," 
he predicted that "the sportsmen of the 
future, fifty years from now, will have 
better shooting than their grandfathers 
knew." 

Lee S. Crandall, bird curator, an- 
nounced that three species of geese had 
been bred for the first time in the history 
of these birds. One of our readers, Mr. 
Jagers, bred the snow goose. Mr. Barnes, 
on the Wm. Rockefeller estate, bred the 
barnacle geese. The N. Y. Zoological 
Park bred Magellan upland geese. 

Mr. Nichols of the American Museum 
of Natural History, told of the habits of 
shore birds, whistling the calls of the 
birds. 

Dr. Nelson favored a treaty with Ar- 
gentina, and said he believed the con- 
troversy regarding elk in the Yellowstone 
region could be stopped. The program 
calls for the purchase of additional lands 
which would provide ample feeding 
grounds. 

A paper read for Aldo Leopold, of 
Albuquerque, New Mexico, brought out 
a discussion that led Mr. Graham of 
Massachusetts to say it would be a good 
policy to purchase cheap lands for the 
benefit of the man who does not belong 
to a hunting or fishing club. 

(It might be a good plan, also, to urge many 
sportsmen to join one or more of the inex- 
pensive clubs started by the Game Breeder. — 
Editor.) 

A resolution was passed favoring cat 
laws to control vagrant cats. The shot- 
gun and steel traps seem to work well 
on the game shooting clubs which do not 
need as many laws as seem to be re- 
quired for unprotected areas. The only 
trouble arises when a neighbor's pet cat 
fails to return home. 



24 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Ewted by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, APRIL, 1919. 
TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountriesand Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Hwntington, President, 

F. R. Pkixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 

E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



An advertiser writes that he had or- 
ders for 47,000 more game birds this 
year than he could supply ; and he sells 
many thousand every season. 



cure game for their customers, filling 
the orders in the order in which they 
are received. 



It would be interesting to have Mr. 
Grinnell visit some of the game shooting 
clubs, game farms and ranches and see 
if he thinks we must wait fifty years 
for good shooting. We know places 
where grandfather's speed would seem 
to be a back number. We rejoice that 
we don't have to wait fifty years. We 
fear we hardly would shoot well with 
that number of years added to our pres- 
ent number — some sixty-odd. 



The war interfered somewhat with 
some of our proposed activities. We 
had proposed organizing the game farm- 
ers and sportsmen in order to be able 
to quickly engage in more experimental 
work and to see that proper amendments 
be made to the laws in states where still 
it is fashionable to arrest food producers 
on account of their industry. 

With all of the young men away it 
was decided that some of the proposed 
work of the society must be deferred ; 
but with the fight for more game and 
fewer game laws practically won (many 
details are to be worked out) we hope 
soon to have the school for game keep- 
ers and many other projects well started. 



Since the game which goes to the 
clubs, preserves and to state officers is 
utilized for sport and later for food ; and 
since vermin no doubt gets much of it 
the customers are continually in the mar- 
ket for more game and advertisers often 
write that they have a bigger mail than 
they can answer. 

Those who appreciate the good work 
the magazine does for them keep their 
advertisements standing, in order to help 
the cause, and they do their best to se- 



Mounted Mammals Wanted. 

(We hope some of our readers will write 
to Dr. Bigelow offering mammals. — Editor.) 
My dear Mr. Huntington : 

I am caring for the interests of the 
Bruce Museum as Curator free of all in- 
come, even paying my own expenses, do- 
ing it all as a labor of love in the great 
cause of promulgating the interest in 
nature. 

I want you to help us in finding mount- 
ed mammals that will be presented to us 
or sold at moderate prices. Will you 
kindly insert a notice that gifts along 
that line will be much appreciated. Do 
you know of any one who has mounted 
mammals that would either give or sell 
at moderate prices? 

Cordially yours, 

Edward F. Bigelow. 

Dear Mr. Bigelow: 

It will give me pleasure to have a 
few mammals we may take on our game 
farm and also some game birds mounted 
and sent with the compliments of the 
game conservation society if you care 
for these. Most of the readers of The 
Game Breeder are interested in game 
birds but some have elk and deer and 
possibly they may donate some weasels, 
mink, skunk or fox if you want these 
animals. 

I am inserting your request, with pleas- 
ure, since our society desires to be help- 
ful in all good work and we will pay 
for the mounting of several animals, 
provided our readers will furnish them 
to our taxidermist. 

Very truly yours, 

D. W. Huntington. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



25 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants « 

WRITE TOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



ZT^a. y;4\\, wM>MZ 



V&U 



F. B. DUSETTE & SONS' GAME RANCH 

BAD AXE, MICH. 



= BREEDERS OF \ 



Pure Wild Mallards, Black Ducks, 
Wild Turkeys and Bob White Quail 



Our game is grown on our 240- Acre Ranch, with natural feed on 
our Several Lakes, which makes our stock very attractive for 
Breeders, Shooting Clubs and Preserve Owners at a minimum 
price. Our birds comply with the Federal regulations which 
permit shooting and sale. 

Contracts Now Open for August and September 
No Eggs for Sale This Season 

F. B. DUSETTE & SONS, BAD AXE, MICH. 



26 



THE GAME BREEDER 




PEINCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

_ The^ accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
RIOT" fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven. Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail; how to erect a fence; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
ennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 

J. M. DOWNS 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 



Member of The Game Guild. 



Member American Game Breeders Society. 



THE HONEYSWEET 

BLACK RASPBERRY 

Best for Home and. Market 

The bushes make good cover for game. 

Strawberry and Asparagus Plants. 

Price Lists Free. 

A. B. KATKAMIER MACEDON, N. Y. 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



JUL 


BOOK ON 


jftv 


DOG DISEASES 


\lB?r 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 


Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S '., 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



27 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. "We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 
A Rebus. 

M. G. F. G. 

Answer — More game and fewer game 
laws. 



A Solon Society. 

Since Solon, of Athens, forbade the 
killing of game, because he observed 
that the Athenians give themselves up to 
the chase to the neglect of the mechani- 
cal arts, there is a rare opportunity to 
start a Solon society in America which 
might go in for prohibiting the chase 
and lawn tennis as a side line. 

The fat girl in the side tent often takes 
in a good deal of money. Prohibition 
collectors, out of a job, can be utilized 
to rake in the stuff. 

The solons on account of our opposi- 
tion will send us a lot of business. 



Peter P. Carney, editor National 
Sports Syndicate, says : 

"Besides making the world safe for Demo- 



crats," as a wit put it not so long ago, the last 
few years have made trapshooting "safe for 
democracy." 

The Gamie Breeder has done much re- 
cently to make the game breeding indus- 
try and the game shooting clubs safe 
for both Democrats and Republicans. 
There are a few backward states lik^ 
Kansas and California where food pro- 
duction is a little dangerous, especially 
if the producer tries to ship his game. 
This is what we refer to when we say 
"shipping facilities" are still bad in 
some regions. Common sense is rapid! \ 
coming back, however, and it is quite 
contagious. 



We- wonder what became of Forest and 
Stream's platform plank "No Sale of 
Game." State game officers and many 
others are purchasing large quantities of 
game from advertisers in The Game 
Breeder. 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



28 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE 



It Is Now Legal to Trap Wild 
Fowl for Breeding Purposes 

Write to The Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, for information about Trapping Permits 

The book, OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS, written by the 
Editor of The Game Breeder, contains full information about the 
trapping of wild fowl and how to rear the birds for profit and 
for sport. There are chapters on How to Form Shooting Clubs ; 
How to Control the Enemies of Wild Fowl, etc. Fully illustrated 
with pictures of ducks on preserves, etc. 

PRICE, #2.00 POSTPAID 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., NEW YORK 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

1 5 Whitehall Street, New York 




Decoy Owls for Crow and Hawk Shooting 
Established 1860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

ERED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America. 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Youra for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



29 




We Arc Now 

Booking 

Orders for 



for Spring Delivery from the following vari- 
eties of pheasants : Silver, Golden. Ringneck, 
Lady Amherst, Formosan, White, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Swinhoe, Versicolor. Impeyan, Soem- 
merring, Manchurian Eared, Melanotus, Black- 
throated Golden, Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, Long- 
tails, and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff Orping- 
ton and R. I. Red fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan and Fancy Ducks, 
Doves of several varieties. Deer. Jack 
Rabbits 

Send $1.00 in stamps for Colortppe Catalogue 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society' 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 

WILD AND BRONZE TURKEY EGGS. PARCEL, 

Post Prepaid. VALLEY VIEW FARM, Bellevilles 

Pennsylvania. It 

PHEASANTS WANTED 

I will buy ringnecked pheasants regardless of sex at 
long as they are strong, healthy birds, large and no 
over two years old. Will purchase small or large num- 
bers for cash. Reference by permission to the Game 
Breeder. ROBT. BOWMAN, care Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

BANTAMS — GOOD GENTLE BIRDS SUITABLE 
for quail and pheasant breeding. JOHN E. DARBY. 
Prop., Maplehurst Poultry Farm, Croswell, Michigan. 

BANTAMS — WILBERT'S FAMOUS BANTAMS. 
Forty varieties. Shipped on approval. Catalog Zfi . 
F. C. WILBERT, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



WANTED 

Twenty =Five Sportsmen 

to join me in an exclusive hunting 
and fishing club. Property in Orange 
and Sullivan Counties, N. Y., adjoin- 
ing the Hartwood Club, the Merrie- 
wold Club and the famous Chester 
W. Chapin game preserve. For par- 
ticulars, apply to 

J. S. HOLDEN, PORT JERVIS, N.Y 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting* 
Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

\WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



EGGS 



HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG50PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentuckv. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky.. 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, beat and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
$1 a year. 



TWO THOUSAND PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. 
Pure Chinese, $3.50 per dozen. Ringnecks, Golden, 
Silver and Mallard Duck, $3.00 per dozen. 120.00 per 
hundred. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL FARM, 
Manzanita, Oregon. 4 t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. $25.00 

per 100. Golden Pheasant Eggs, 60c. each. Day old 

Pheasants, 60c. each. Booking orders now. Mrs. EDGAR 

TILTON.Suffern, N.Y. jt 

STOCK AND EGGS OF RINGNECKS, LADY 
Amherst, Golden and Silver Pheasants. Wild strain 
Mallards. Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams. 
" Ringlet " Barred Plymouth Rock Chickens Peafowl. 
MRS. IVER CHR1STENSON, Jamestown, Kansas. 
No. 1. 6t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your lefters: "Yours for More Game." 



so 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Breeders' Cards 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 

Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 




PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 

Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King- Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

ber of the Game Guild. 




Mem 



PHEASANT EGGS AND PHEASANTS 

Pheasant eggs for sale up to 
May 15, $25.00 per hundred. 
110 eggs sent for cash with 
order after May 15, $20 per 
110 eggs. Pheasants for Sep- 
tember and October delivery. 
Write for prices. GEORGE 
BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
R No. 1, Englishtown, New 
Jersey. 










LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



QUAIL 

TWO 

SPECIES 



QUAIL 

Bobwhite Quail, Eighteen Dol- 
lars per dozen. Blue or Scaled 
Quail, Fifteen Dollars per dozen. 
Twenty years experience in 
handling quail. Safe arrival 
guaranteed. PAN AMERICAN 
BIRD CO., Laredo, Texas. 



**- - - ' . ' \ . _- 





DARK MALLARD 

Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 

These ducks are reared on free range 
especially for shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.50 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 

We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 

ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated I 
book. Our Wild Fowland Waders," j 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION «# -S * 
SOCIETY, Publishers 
150 Nassau St., New York 






in writing to advertiser! please mention The Game Breeder or sipn your letters: "Yours for More G 



THE GAME BREEDER 



31 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



PHEASANTS AND 

PHEASANT EGGS. 

Chinese Pheasant Eggs, 

$25 per hundred. Chinese 

Pheasants for Fall delivery. 

Mrs. G. H. ROBBINS, 
Route 2, Hood River, Ore. 




CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word.' No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, North Carolina. 8t 

RABBIT AND HARK SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 

FOX AND MINK WANTED 

Wanted— Pair red fox pups; also breeders; pair mink 
and marten R, H. BARKER, 2034 East Fourth St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. It 

LIVE GAME 

AMHERST, REEVES, SILVER AND MONGOLIAN 
Pheasant esrgs $5.00 a dozen, two dozen, $9.00. Chinese 
Ringnecks, S3 50 a dozen, $2500 a hundred. Mongolians, 
»35 00 a hundred "Pheasant Farming," illustrated, 50c. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 2 t 

WANTED IO BUY PHEASANTS I WANT 

Silvers. Lady Amherst. Golden and Reeves. 
Quote Prices, Ages, and Quantity. 

Morgan's. Phsntry, 244 E. 61st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE— RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoe«, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW 
ing prices : Mallards, $3.75 per pair. Pintails, $3.25 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $5.00 per pair. Blue Wing Teal, 
$3-75 P er pair. Also reiheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN. 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 



HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST. 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 

A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans.Wild Duoks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

FOR SALE— PHEAbANTS, PEA FOWL, PIGEONS, 
Poultry, Bantams and Pit Games Eggs from the 
above stock for sale. Rabbits. Cavies, Squirrels, fur 
bearing animals, etc. I buy, sell and exchange. L. L 
KIRKPATRICK, Box 273, Bristol, Tenn. 

WANTED — WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX 
Pied Peafowl. Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



Pheasants Wanted 



WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. qt 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gama." 



32 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FIVE VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. WILD DUCKS. 

Wild Geese, Brants, Wild Turkeys and other Game, 

List for stamp. G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville, Illinois. 4 t 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— FOR FANCY DUCKS, 
geese or pheasants. 15 pair of 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds. Ducks 88.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton, Ohio. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS FOR SALE. LARGE, HARDY 

specimens. Satisfaction guaranteed. LEWIS 

COMPTON, Dias Creek, New Jersey. 2t 

HAVE SIX MALE CANVASBACKS FOR SALE, 
$10.00 each or will exchange for wood duck pairs. 
These are hand raised from pure wild stock. Have a few 
canvasback eggs for sale, $12.00 per dozen. A. WOLFE, 
9848 76th Ave., Edmonton, S., Alberta, Canada It 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE IS OF ENORMOUS 
size. It grows faster, matures and breeds earlier than 
any other rabbit, but best of all is its delicious meat and 
beautiful fur. Write for information and prices. 
SIBERIAN FUR FARM, Hamilton, Canada. 6t 



EGGS 

PHEASANT EGGS — RINGNECK, 82.50 PER 13. 

Wild Mallard Eggs. $1.50 per 11. JOHN SAMMONS, 

Yankton, South Dakota. 2t 

GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS, $5.00 per doien. Cash 
with order. F. W. DANE, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD DUCK EGGS FOR SALB— 
From my New Jersey farm, pure bred, light gray wild 
mallard duck eggs. Stock strong on wing. $3.50 per 13 ; 
$25.00 per 100. H. W. VAN ALEN, 215 Montague St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. at 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



SPEAKING OF MAGGOTS, OME OF THE LARG- 
est pheasant dealers, in his oatalogue says : " We do not 
recommend their use except by experts, for if not tho- 
roughly cleaned, they will kill the birds." Feed them 
Meal Worms, a clean, choice food, 500, $1.00; 1000, $1.50; 
5000, $5.00- Express prepaid. C. R. KERN, Mount Joy, 
Pennsylvania. It 



GAMEKEEPERS 

GAMEKEEPER AT LIBERTY. RELIABLE, WANTS 
position on club preserve or game farm. Expeiienced 
on game and ornamental birds or animals, gun dogs and 
extermination of vermin. MILTON, in care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 



WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A. S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 



WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. THOR- 

oughly experienced in rearing Pheasants. Wild Turkeys 

and Wild Ducks. Good references. GAMEKEEPER, 

463 East 57th St., N. Y. C. it 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES POSITION. LIFE Ex- 
perience, excellent references. Age 40. Married. 
RALPH LEE, Bernardsville, New Jersey. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

FOR SALE— GAME FARM. TWO HUNDRED AND 
fifty acres. Twenty-eight deer. Fine new log bungalow. 
Fine hunting. A beautilul home. Price $60.00 per 
acre. Owner G. D. GORNS, Purdue, Douglas Co., 
Oregon. 2t 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS, $5.00 A PAIR. GOLDENS, 
$10.00 a pair. Guaranteed strong and in the pink of con- 
dition for Spring breeding. Order now as I have a limited 
supply of birds. LILLIAN E. GALLUP, 2209 Ogden, 
Omaha, Nebraska. it 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes. 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared, 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c. postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 

WANTED-PARTY TO TAKE HALF INTEREST IN 

a well established wild fowl farm. Address "OWNER," 

care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. it 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house of six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



In writing 1 to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More G»me. : 




Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 &1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood-Duck, Pintails and other specie* 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and aM 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 beat 
Royal Swans of England. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acre* 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Vour visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelohia. 





WM. J. MACKENSEN 



Department V. 



YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA 

Member of The Game Guild 




Game Farm or Preserve 



A large tract of land suitable for a game farm or 
preserve is offered for sale at an attractive price. 

The land is near New York on a good Automobile 
Road and contains a large pond and stream. There 
are some trout and the waters can be made to yield 
large numbers of these fish. The land is suitable for 
deer, upland game and wild ducks. I shall be pleased 
to show this property to anyone wishing to start a 
game farm or preserve. 

The place is within fifty miles of the City and can be 
reached by Automobile in an hour and a half. 

For particulars address, 

' OWNER ====^== 



Care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York 



5~>+.Ucj 




THE- 



AH E BREEDER 



VOL. XV 



MAY, 1919 



No. 2 



The- Object of this magazine- is 



to Make- Noeth Am erica the- 5iggest 
iGAHE Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 




Survey of the Field— A Campaign Against Crows— Calling 
the Crow— Owl Decoys— Meat Baits — Cats and Cat Laws- 
Cats on a Game Breeding Ground— Promising Subject for a 
Test Case — Game Protective Association Bulletin — Domestic 
Pheasants in California Jeopardized by Bill — State Nullification 
—Sunday Fishing — Quail and Bandits — Sunday Hunting in 
Maine. 

Wild Fowl and Game Laws in South Dakota - E. D. Pickell 
Wild Bred and Hand Reared Birds - -. By the Editor 
Permits to Trap and Sell Wild Fowl U. S. Biological Survey 
Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - - : 

Gambel's Quail Vanishing in New Mexico and Increasing 
In New York -A Bird in the Hand — Canadian Ducks and 
Grouse — Pheasants and Quail— The Right Kind of Ammu- 
nition — More Praise— The Long Island Game Breeders 
Association — The Beneficial Owl — Small Hawks— Market 
Prices— Quail and Quail Eggs — New York Laws and Federal 
Regulations — Aviary Pheasants on the Preserve. 
Editorials — More Laws -A Uniform Law for Massachusetts. 



Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July q, igrs, at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



s* 



M 



-&!*r \\m~ H 



PUBLISHED BY 

1E- GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A S8J>*v/f-/S 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii,iiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiii[iiii!i;iiiiiiii«iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHii!iuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!ii!)ii!iniiiii;;iii., 




S 



Anyone Can Hatch Pheasant Chicks, but it 
takes Experience to Rear Them Successfully 

DO YOU KNOW THE VALUE OP 

SPRATT'S 

Pheasant Meals Nos. 5 and 1 2 
and Chicgrain 




These foods are used by the leading Game Breeders throughout 
the world and there is nothing on the market that can take their place. 



If your dealer cannot supply you, write to us for prices and further particulars. 



Send 2c stamp for "Dog Culture, " 10c for "Poultry Culture" 
and 25c for "Pheasant Culture" 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 

Factory also in London, England 



THE GAME BREEDER 



33 



|L,; 



;_r 




tk Annual 




Trap shooting Event 

Freehophies forlrapshooting Clubs 




Smokeless 

Shotgun 

Powders 

leaders for over a century — 
are the choice of the Nation's 
crack trapshots. Look for 
the names on the Shell Box 
when you purchase shells. 

DU PONT - BALL1STITE 
SCHULTZE 



Learn to shoot. Know how to handle and u se a gun. 
Sharpen your judgment. Quicken your me A speed. 

Trapshooting 

is the reconstructive Sport for modern men and women — and panic' 
ularly for the business man. It demands concentration — the kind of 
concentration that takes you completely away from business cares 
and worries. It sends you back clearer and keener in thought and 
judgment. 

Beginners' Day Shoots 

will be held at hundreds of gun clubs during June and July. Why 
not attend? Get a taste of the game's fascination. Don't let pride 
or timidity stop you. The gun club is the place to learn and the old 
timers will be glad to welcome and help you. 

Write today for full information and name of nearest gun club. 
SPORTING POWDER DIVISION 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. 



The Principal du Pont Products are : 

Explosives: Industrial, Agricultural and sporting. Chemicals: Pyroxylin Solutions, Ethers. Bronzing Liquids, 
Coal Tar Distillates, Commercial Acids, Alums, etc. Leather Substitutes: Fabrikoid Upholstery, Rayntite 
Top Material, Fairfield Rubber Cloth. Pyroxylin Plastics: Ivory, Shell and Transparent Py-ra-lin, Py-ra-lin 
Specialties, Challenge Cleanable Collars and Cuff's. Paints and Varnishes: For Industrial and Home Uses. 
Pigments and Colors in Oil: For Industrial Uses. Lithopone : For Industrial Uses. Stains, Fillers, 
Lacquers and Enamels: For Industrial and Home Uses. Dyestuffs: Coal Tar Dyestuffs and Intermediates. 

For full information address : Advertising Division, E. I. du Pont de Nemours &- Co., Wilmington, Delaware. 



Visit the Trapshooting School, Young's Pier, Atlantic City, N. J- 






"pre 



34 THE GAME BREEDER 



Let your trap gun purchase be a PARKER. 
Be one of the thousands of satisfied PARKER 
Gun users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The 
purchaser of a PARKER Gun receives in good sub- 
stantial gun value, the benefits of experience in gun 
manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never 
be satisfied with anything but the BEST. D . _ __. *T 1> H u» /"fc & 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not rAKtlH,K DKU3. 

now? Master Gun Makers MERIDEN, CONN., U.S.A. 

Send for catalogue and free booklet about 20 bore guns. New York Salesrooms, 25 Murray Street 



Mallards, 


Teal, 

and 


Qixail 


Japane 


ss^^*silkie«s* 


Pure-bred Birds Raised Under Semi-Natural Conditions 


Z. TED DeKALMAR, R. 


f\ D. No. 30, 


Stamford, Conn. 


STATE GAME LICENSE No 123. FEDERAL 


PERMIT No. 1. 




Ringnecks Chinese Reeves Golden 

Silver Amherst Japanese Silky Fowl 

Book your order for eggs now. Eggs in any quantity from the 
Japanese Silky — Rhode Island Red Cross. The perfect mother 
lor large breeders of Pheasants. 

We have one of the largest exclusive Game Breeding Farms in the U. S., and we 
warrant every bird we ship to be in prime condition for breeding or show purpo.^es. 

We are now contracting full wing Ringnecks in any quantity up to 5,000 for 
August and early fall delivery. 

If you want some splendid Chinese-Mongolian cocks for new blood in your pens, 
and are willing to pay $3 each for them, send us a check. Hens $4- 50. 
Expensive, but they're worth it, Member of the Game Guild 

MARMOT PHEASANTRY, MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



35 



Here 
They Are ! 

And they're all good shells. But a 
good shell is a better one when it is loaded 
with Infallible or "E. C." 

Use these powders — you'll smash more targets 
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know are reliable. In other words, use 

HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 



INFALLIBLE 



'E.C. 



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When you buy loaded shells, specify a Hercules Smoke- 
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of the best service that a powder can give. 

Any one of the fourteen standard shells listed here 
can be bought loaded with Infallible or "E.C." 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

61 W. 10th Street 
Wilmington, Delaware -£*SS 



I i 



mmms 

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36 



„■! G 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



THE GAME BREEDER 

Civilian A: 

on the Rifle Range 



merica 



No. 5 

American Marksmen Series 

Painted for Remington UMC 

by F. X. Leyendecker 




^^TE V ER before was the American civilian so fortunate as now m his 
-*- ^ fondness for the sport of targ'et shooting. In assuming world-leader- 
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Is there an active civilian rifle club -where you live — equipped for long range shooting? 

Are you getting your share of this splendid, beneficial sport; incidentally doing your bit to help j 
keep it true that we are a nation of marksmen? 

More than one hundred years of service to shooters equips Remington UMC to best assist you 
■with information. Our Service Department, in touch with over 2,500 civilian rifle clubs, will 
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Rifle Club Secretaries — If not already registered for Remington UMC free service, write for blank registra- 
tion card and a complimentary copy of tbe revised Remington UMC Handbook for Rifle Club Officials. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the World 

WOOL WORTH BUILDING NEW YORK 



' 



T h ! Game Breeder 



VOLUME XV 



MAY, 1919 

CD 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 2 



A Campaign Against Crows. 

Mr. Peter P. Carney says : A nation- 
wide campaign is being waged to exter- 
minate the crow. Taking a leaf from 
the book of the citizens of Canton, S. D., 
where a crow shoot is held annually, 
a National Crow Shoot is being staged 
this year. 

Grain can be conserved and game pro- 
tected by removing the "caws." The 
crow's record is like his coat as black as 
black can be. The "caw" hasn't a friend. 
Those promoting the National Crow 
Shoot are doing the world a great good, 
for there will be fewer crows in 1920 
than there have been in many years. 

The crow has the universal reputation 
of being a wise, wily and wary bird. 
Yet it is surprising how easily he is 
fooled by any one who can properly 
manipulate a crow call. Indeed, the call- 
ing-in and shooting of crows by an ex- 
pert is a revelation to many, who, all 
their lives, have known and hated these 
black marauders of the fields and woods. 
The crow call is a small wood instru- 
ment resembling a whistle and can be 
purchased at almost any sporting goods 
or hardware store. There are several 
good crow calls on the market. Direc- 
tions for its use come with each call. 

Calling the Crow. 

Preparatory to calling in the crows, 
the shooter should conceal himself care- 
fully and remain as quiet as possible, 
for the crow has wonderful eyesight. 
Many crow hunters even try to wear 
clothing that will not contrast sharply 
with the environment. In using the 
crow call, it is desirable to try to imi- 
tate the cry of a young crow in distress 
and to indicate to the older crows that 
their young are being attacked by some 



other bird, upon which they will im- 
meaiareiy start hying toward the point 
vvnere the caller is conceaied. 

it is important to knl the first crow 
shot at, as otherwise tne crow will give 
a warning call tnat wnl alarm all the 
other crows in the neighbornood and 
tney will not approach again for some 
time at least. the birds should be 
fairly close in, not over 35 to 40 yards, 
in order to insure a kill with a choke 
bore gun. 

Among other methods suggested for 
luring the crows within range, the fol- 
lowing may be recommended : 

Owl Decoys. 

A stuffed owl with movable wings 
placed up in a tree and operated by 
cords brought down through rings to 
the concealed shooter, used in conjunc- 
tion with a crow call, has proved effec- 
tive in many instances. If a wounded 
crow is captured, it will serve as an 
excellent decoy for attracting other 
crows. 

The owl is the bugaboo of birds and 
the crows are sure to attack it. Excel- 
lent crow shooting is obtained by using 
owl decoys, which can be had from Fred 
Sauter, taxidermist, New York. See 
his advertisement on another page. 

Meat Baits. 

A farmer informs us that by placing 
a large piece of meat or the carcass of 
some animal in a field and then getting 
under cover at a distance of 40 or 50 
yards, he has seen from 50 to 75 crows 
gather around the meat in a snort time, 
and has been able to kill ten or more 
with a single shot. 

Crow shooting in the winter wfren 
snow is on the ground is good sport, ac- 



38 



THE GAME BREEDER 



cording to another writer. Decoys are 
placed in open fields close to the edge 
of woods or a ditch and the crow call 
used. After one or two crows have been 
brought down, they are set up in the 
field on a couple of pointed sticks, and 
as they soon freeze, they make excellent 
decoys. 

Cats and Cat Laws. 

The game protective societies are 
busy securing cat laws and the game 
breeders are busy killing cats. As 
usual both groups get what they go after ; 
the first named get their laws and the 
last named get the cats. 

There is room enough in America for 
both industries. No cat laws are needed 
on the game farm and preserve where 
steel traps and shotguns are in constant 
use. We are quite sure the cats do less 
harm on game preserves than they do 
on the vast areas where they are sup- 
posed to be controlled by laws only. 

Cats on a Game Breeding Ground. 

A good big cat was instantly killed, 
at forty yards, by a shot from a Parker 
twenty gauge gun on the preserve of 
The Long Island Game Breeders' Asso- 
ciation a few days ago. If the cat had 
nine lives he surrendered them all at 
once when the gun cracked. 

Another big yellow cat which took a. 
look at the quail lost a good tuft of hair 
from the top of its head when a load of 
shot struck it, and it left as if it had no 
intention of returning. 

Another big cat remained when he 
stepped on a steel trap and the same 
trap baited with fish took a skunk the 
following evening. 

Promising Subject for a Test Case. 

R. P. _ Holland, U. S. Game Warden 
of Atchison, Kansas, arrested the dis- 
trict attorney of the state of Missouri 
on March 6th, along with some other 
prominent men who were shooting ducks 
in violation of the migratorv bird treaty 
act, on Stultz Lake, near Clinton, Mis- 
souri. 

There is nothing to show, as far as 
our information goes, that Attorney- 



General Frank McAllister, of Jefferson 
City, was looking for trouble. In fact, he 
is quoted by a local paper as intimating 
that the arrest was unexpected' and this 
despite the fact that in February a con- 
current resolution was put through the 
Missouri legislature "suggesting to the 
attorney-general that he investigate the 
matter of enjoining the federal game in- 
spectors from interference with the game 
laws of the state. Mr. McAllister, how- 
ever, is apparently in something of a 
hole. He is quoted as saying: "Better 
that I be used as an instrument to test 
the validity of the law than some poor 
fellows who are unable to bear the ex- 
pense of fighting such a case." 

Apparently the Missouri legislature 
was induced to pass the joint resolution 
under the erroneous impression that the 
principle of state ownership of migra- 
tory birds was sustained by the United 
States Supreme Court in the appeal un- 
der the first migratory bird law. This, 
of course, is an error, as the United 
States Supreme Court gave no opinion 
on the original migratory bird law. 

The friends of the federal law will 
welcome a test case, now or at any other 
time. It is proper that the constitution- 
ality of the law should be determined. 
They agree with the attorney-general in 
Missouri that he will be an admirable in- 
strument to try out the validity of the 
law. Let us by all means have the case 
pushed through as rapidly as possible, 
so that when the matter is settled there 
will be no further excuse for any one 
shooting at a time when the federal reg- 
ulations do not permit it. 

—Game Protective Association Bulletin. 



Although we have doubted if the 
constitution of the United States can be 
amended simply by securing a treaty 
with another country, the migratory bird 
law with its Section 12 giving full pro- 
tection to game breeders is so eminently 
satisfactory that we have no objection 
to the law. The Supreme Court undoubt- 
edly has held that the state owns the 
game and that the regulation of the tak- 
ing of it is within the police powers of 
the state. Possibly the court may now 



THE GAME BREEDER 



39 



hold that this applies to resident game 
and that migratory fowl are owned by 
the Nation, and that it is within the po- 
lice powers of the United States to reg- 
ulate the taking of migrants. One thing 
is certain, the property should not be 
regulated by both the state and the na- 
tion, since it is absurd for one govern- 
ment to permit the taking of game for 
breeding purposes and to permit the 
shooting at a time when another govern- 
ment arrests people for so doing. It is 
equally certain that many game breeders 
now own a big lot of game and are sell- 
ing it to state departments, game farms, 
preserve owners and individuals for 
breeding purposes, export and for food. 

Domestic Pheasants in California Jeo- 
pardized by Bill. 

Senator Chamberlain gave notice that 
he would move reconsideration of a bill 
passed by the Senate today making it a 
misdemeanor for any one in California 
to hunt, pursue, take, kill, destroy or 
have possession of swans, wild pheas- 
ants, quail or partridge. He said the 
bill as passed would prevent any one 
having possession of a domesticated 
pheasant. The measure was passed to- 
day. 

The Senate also passed a bill by 
Scott prohibiting fishing within 250 feet 
of a fishway or within 100 feet of the 
upper side of any fish screen. The meas- 
ure was the first to be passed at the sec- 
ond half of the legislative session. 

The bill, we are informed, was recon- 
sidered. 

State Nullification. 

Charles Stanley, of Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, writing to The World says : 

The following clipping from a recent issue 
of the Kansas City Star is enlightening as to 
the attitude of Prohibition Kansas toward a 
national law that conflicts with the wishes of 
what must be a small portion of its inhabitants. 
I quote : 

The Kansas Legislature has passed a law to 
legalize the shooting of ducks in defiance of 
the Federal law against that sport. The Kan- 
sas law, in fact, was passed for the purpose of 
defying the Federal law, and provides that any 
one arrested by the Federal authorities under 
the Kansas law will have the full legtl pro- 
tection of the State. 



So there you are. If any one believes that 
Kansas can keep him out of a Federal jail, let 
him go out and kill a duck. It will add a lot 
of sport to the already bully sport of duck- 
hunting. 

These same good, law-abiding citizens held 
up their hands in holy horrors when the 
brewers make the claim that the manufacture 
and sale of 2^4 'per cent, beer is not contrary 
to the letter and intent of the National Prohi- 
bition Law, inasmuch as it is not intoxicating. 
To illustrate : One pint of 2% per cent, con- 
tains 44-100 of one ounce of 100-proof alcohol, 
or less than one tablespoonful of alcohol of the 
strength of the best whiskey. One quart, 
which should satisfy the thirst of even a Kan- 
sas Prohibitionist, would contain but a trifle 
over a tablespoonful and a half of 100-proof 
whiskey. The ordinary twelve-ounce glass 
used on bars contains only 33-100 of an ounce, 
or less than three teaspoonfuls of 100-proof 
alcohol. 

If one State can defy the national law in 
protecting game birds, another State can defy 
the Anti-Saloon League's pet scheme to en- 
courage moonshining throughout the country. 

Sunday Fishing. 

It should be a source of gratification 
to The Sun and to The Sun's Rod and 
Gun contributors that after a two years' 
fight against the penal code statute which 
prohibited fishing "upon the first day of 
the week" that statute has been elim- 
inated from the law. Now any one can 
fish on' Sunday without making himself 
subject to arrest, fine and conviction. 

The Sun editorially stood back of the 
anglers in their demand for freedom on 
that day, and it is to The Sun as well 
as to Gov. Smith that thanks should go. 
Also to those who did the propaganda 
work, "Bob-o-Link," James F. Farn- 
ham, president of the Albany County 
Fish and Game Club ; W. L. Loope, ed- 
itor of the Mileton "Telegram" ; "Game 
Law" (who is a well known citizen of 
Albany), and others. 

It is worth while to print what Gov. 
Smith said in a statement concerning the 
bill : 

"As to the proposal to eliminate the 
prohibition against fishing," he says, 
"which many years ago became and has 
remained a dead letter, there seems to be 
no serious opposition, and it is proper 
that the law should be amended so that 
it will carry no longer an utterly un- 
forced and unenforceable provision in 
this regard." 



40 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Good Work. 

In the mail today a New Jersey mem- 
ber (N. J. 526, he requests that we do 
not mention his name) sent a check for 
ten dollars and a list of people whom he 
wishes to interest in The Game Breeder. 
In the same mail a New Hampshire 
member (N. H. 455) sent a check for 
four dollars with a note asking that The 
Game Breeder be sent to the libraries 
in three towns in his state and that his 
own subscription be advanced for an- 
other year. Activity of this kind is en- 
couraging to editors. 

An Iowa reader, in sending the money 
for some new subscribers, says he let 
them pay, since "anyone not willing to 
pay a dollar for the best magazine is 
not worth having." 

Many members have sent three dol- 
lars each for three new subscriptions. 
Some say they wish to interest their 
friends ; others, like the Iowa reader, let 
the new subscribers pay for their maga- 
zines. 

When The Game Breeder was first 
issued game breeding was a criminal per- 
formance almost everywhere in Amer- 
ica; many predicted that it would be 
impossible on this account to induce peo- 
ple to engage in the industry. 

The rapidity with which the industry 
has grown is surprising and gratifying. 
One reason why it has grown faster in 
some states than in others is that our 
readers have taken a more active inter- 
est in some states than they have in 
others. The states where we have the 
largest circulation now have the best 
laws, the best state game officers, and 
game breeders are encouraged to pro- 
duce game for sport and for profit. 

It is a very easy matter for readers to 
send us the names of people in their 
neighborhood who are or who should be 
interested in game breeding. It is 
clearly to the interest of our members 
to increase the number of those who 
read the magazine. 

It is not so easy for us to ascertain 
who are likely to become interested in 
any place and for this reason we rely 
upon our readers to heln the cause as 
many do. If the cause is worth while 
it is worth helping"; we hope our mem- 
bers alwavs will bear in mind the fact 



that there is strength in numbers. So 
please send in the names as requested. 

Two Checks. 

Two checks came back in the same 
mail today (April 26). One from a 
state game officer who thought he could 
secure some prairie grouse for scientific 
purposes ; one from a state officer from 
whom we expected to secure some Gam- 
bel's quail. The deadly fool laws have 
made the game so scarce that it is next to 
impossible to secure breeding stock. 
Now that upland shooting is prohibited 
in most of the states and it is not worth 
while to own setters and pointers, we 
think it is highly desirable for those who 
own prairie grouse to hold on to them, 
but some of our readers are offering to 
send the birds for breeding purposes as 
soon as they can obtain proper shipping 
facilities. 

We often wonder' if the dog papers, 
Sportsman's Review and American 
Field, have not noticed the loss of their 
dog advertisements. Possibly this is the 
reason why one of the papers named is 
not so busy, as the story papers are, get- 
ting subscribers for the bulletin of the 
Protection Society. 



Quail and Bandits. 

One of our Texas members writes : 
'About Mearn's quail. I can get them 
if conditions in Mexico would get better, 
but as it is now, my men are afraid to 
go far into the interior where they are 
to be found on account of the bandits. 
It is not safe anywhere in Mexico awav 
from the larger cities and main lines of 
travel." 

Sunday Hunting in Maine. 

The Committee on Fish and Game of 
the Main Legislature reported adversely 
a bill permitting Sunday shooting. 



Not That Kind. 

"Griggs and his wife are not getting 
along very smoothly, I hear," said Brown 
to Smith. 

"No," replied Smith, "and you can't 
wonder at it. He married a girl that 
looked like a magazine cover, and then 
expected her to work like a cook book." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



41 



WILD FOWL AND GAME LAWS IN SOUTH DAKOTA. 



By E. D. Pickell. 



When I met you a year ago in New 
York City I told you I was going on a 
farm, where I hoped to recover my 
health. I was then looking for a farm 
in New England which would be suit- 
able for wild game, fruit and poultry. 
I found many places suitable as far as 
water was concerned, but the soil did 
not suit me, being used to broad prairies, 
as far as the eye can reach ; the hills of 
your state did not appeal to me. I had 
been told that a western man never 
would be satisfied in the East. As to 
that I cannot say, only this, something 
seemed lacking and, after travelling 
through the country from the shores of 
the St. Lawrence river to Chesapeake 
bay, I was very glad to turn my eyes 
westward to the big prairies of South 
Dakota, with her beautiful sunsets and 
sparkling lakes, dotted with myriads of 
wild water-fowl. To a man who loves 
game as I do, this is restful to the eye. 
It must be true that I love it, for my 
better half has accused me of it more 
than once. 

I sold my game park at Huron and 
last season I spent on my brother's ranch 
in North Dakota, where there are lakes 
and game galore ; where I could study 
their ways of feeding and raising their 
numerous families in happy content- 
ment. 

Here were the Mallards, Pintails, 
Canvasbacks, Redheads, Scaups, and 
many other varities, and even the little 
ruddy duck raising her brood. Many 
mornings in May and June while roam- 
ing over the hills I have started the wild 
Mallard, Pintail, Spoonbill, Gadwall and 
both the Teal from their downy nests ; 
sometimes it would be in a clump of 
buck-brush, again it would be in the 
open, near a tuft of grass. Generally 
there would be from 8 to 14 eggs of a 
greenish white color. The nests were 
lined with a beautiful soft down from 
the breast of the mother duck. 

Many of the nests would be a mile or 



more from water. It has always seemed 
strange to me that the ducks go so far 
away from the lake. The mother duck 
when the little ones are only a few hours 
old will start on their long journey to 
the water, and they very seldom give out 
on the way. In the thirty years that I 
have lived in the wild ducks' domain I 
have never found more than a dozen of 
the ducklings abandoned by the mother 
on the road to water. 

The only way you can ever find the 
nests of Canvasback, Redhead and other 
deep water species is to get inside of a 
pair of waders and get out among the 
reeds and flags ; generally you will find 
them from ten to twenty feet from the 
shore, built like a coot's nest floating 
among the reeds. Six to eleven eggs is 
about their number. I have known of a 
Redhead's nest being built on shore close 
to the water, but it is seldom you will 
find them on the bank. I have never 
found a Scaup's nest here in South Da- 
kota, but they must breed here, as many 
broods can be seen on the lake in June. 

I do not think that the Widgeon 
breeds in this state, as I have never seen 
any young during the breeding season. 
Many old birds stop here every spring 
and fall on their way north and south. 
The Gadwalls breed here by the thou- 
sands. Also the Spoonbill, which can 
be found on all the sloughs. I have 
raised many of these, but I always found 
them harder to start than most varities 
since they suck their food from the 
water. They will learn to eat grain and 
I have kept many a one on a clear grain 
diet when the water and ground was 
frozen in winter and I could not get 
worms for them. They seem to like a 
duck mash more than grain when they 
cannot get bugs from the water. I like 
to watch the young males get their new 
plumage and I think they would be beau- 
tiful were it not for their ill-shaped bills. 

Stale bread crumbs in water will start 
this duck eating quicker than anything 



42 



THE GAME BREEDER 



I have ever tried, unless it might be a 
live bug placed before him in the water; 
if the bug don't put life in him he is 
already dead but don't know it. 

Some think the mallards, being so 
common, will eat anything a tame duck 
will eat. My experience is that pure 
bred wild mallards are just as particular 
about what they eat as any of the other 
breeds of ducks, the only difference is 
the mallards will eat any kind of grain 
just so it is clean and wholesome. Of 
course you can force a mallard to eat 
spoiled, musty grain by starving him to 
it; but you will be the loser. I feed 
more stale bread to young ducks than I 
used to as I find it a great deal cheaper 
and it also agrees with them; changing 
to egg custard and duck mashes as they 
grow older, adding chick food after 10 
days. Gravel is kept before them at all 
times. A friend of mine raised a brood 
of Canvasback in a small back yard lot 
in the city, giving them nothing but stale 
bread and finely chopped lettuce, throw- 
ing it in their swimming pool. I bought 
these ducks and they were fine large 
birds. 

I see a few flocks of the beautiful 
Bufflehead duck go through here, when 
the flight is on, but they do not stop but 
a few days. Ten years ago this duck 
was passing in large flocks ; twenty-five 
years ago thousands passed over. A few 
years more and their flight will be a 
thing of the past. Both the Teal and the 
Gadwall breed here in large numbers, 
although the Greenwings are only a few 
in number compared to what they were 
a few years ago. Young Teal, especially 
Greenwing, are easy to raise, and they 
will learn to eat as easily as Mallards. 
I have had as many as twenty-five Teal 
with one chicken hen. Of course they 
are like all young ducks as they grow 
older, they then lead and the hen has to 
follow. I have raised Teal and Spoon- 
bill with decoy Mallards as foster moth- 
ers, but I like them much better with 
a light chicken hen. 

I have had young Teal so tame that I 
could not dig angleworms fast enough 
to suit them and while spading up the 
ground they would pull and jerk on the 
worms to get them from their holes. 



I am enclosing photographs of a pair of 
Snow Geese which are owned on the 
game farm of H. J. Jager. This pair of 
Snow Geese are the first to my knowl- 
edge which have set and raised young 
in captivity. The mother is hatching 
and you will notice one of her babies 
in front of her. They have set now for 
two years, laying, I think, six eggs each 
year. Money could not buy this pair of 
birds of Mr. Jager. I have just received 
a letter from him stating that his Snow 
Geese and also his Blue Geese, of which 
he has a fine flock, have begun to lay 
already. Since it is only April 14th, it 
seems to be rather early for them to lay. 
Mr. Jager, who, by the way, is a thor- 
ough naturalist, has one of the finest col- 
lections of wild game birds anyone could 
wish for. He and his wife are both 
taxidermists and they have one of the 
finest collections of mounted birds and 
animals, covering nearly all species of 
birds, both land and water fowl, and 
many species of small fur bearers. Mr. 
Jager only keeps his wild fowl for the 
pleasure he gets from caring for them. 
It is no unusual sight to see pheasants 
and other birds in their lovely plumage 
parading on his beautiful lawn. You 
will enjoy a visit with him among his 
birds and will be entertained like a 
prince. 

When I read in The Game Breeder 
about the Congress, at last, giving us 
game-breeders a chance to trap birds for 
propagation, I was very much pleased, 
as I had disposed of all my collection, 
excepting breeding stock, and I hoped I 
could get a few birds for new blood, if 
nothing more. I wrote our game war- 
den asking what I had to do to get one 
of these permits' from Washington, D. 
C., and I received this answer : "It would 
do you no good to get a permit as this 
state does not allow birds to be trapped 
for breeding purposes." Now how is 
this, Mr. Editor? I supposed when Con- 
gress passed a law it covered one state 
as well as another. Why have not I as 
much right to trap them for breeding in 
South Dakota as I would if I were a 
resident of New York? 

About sixty rods west of my yards is 
a lake covering about forty acres. A 



THE GAME BREEDER 43 

neck of land, or sand bar, runs out into birds, are a nuisance in our grain fields, 
this lake. Nearly every morning and Last winter about a hundred prairie 
until evening this lake is black with chickens stayed near our yards every 
ducks; they will sit on this sandbar; it day, getting a full feed of corn. I could 
is most of the time covered with ducks, have easily trapped them and raised a 
Imagine yourself in my place — I am not large flock of young from them this sea- 
wanting to' kill these ducks, only to son and had a few to pass on to the rest 
propagate from them. In the open sea- of the game breeders for propagation, 
son I can take my gun and destroy these but the law says "NO, you cannot trap 
birds and nothing is said— that is law- them to save them, but wait until fall 
ful ; but I cannot trap any of them to and you can kill them !" This flock and 
save them, for that is not lawful. I their young will give the hunters this 
have walked within six rods of these fall just a few hours of pleasure. How 
birds ; they are not shot at and for that about the pleasure we would have had in 
reason are much tamer than in the fall, propagating them? The sage-hen and 
In the open season, every fall, thou- the grouse are going the same way ; only 
sands of hunters in this state slaughter a few more years and they will be like 
the ducks and other game birds, more the other inhabitants of these prairies, 
for the pleasure of killing than any The buffalo is gone, only for a few speci- 
other reason. Do they stop and think mens that some of our far-seeing people 
where this will end if we keep on? insisted on trying to save by propagat- 
Twenty-five years ago geese and ducks i n g. When I came to South Dakota the 
by the millions crossed this state on Curlew and the other upland game birds 
their trips to and from their breeding were s0 abundant you could see them in 
grounds; now there are thousands where large flocks Now we se ldom see any. 
then there were millions. We wonder A few more years of this keeping t h e lid 
where they have gone Where are the . ht Qn breeding, and not allowing 
large flocks of cranes that used to light ug breeders t0 propaga te them, and the 
on our fields? We seldom hear more ^ ^ ^^ mQre scarce than 

than a dozen flocks m a season now ; °, , . , tJ , A —, , 

•11 u <-u ~„ ~. +t,<> „ nc . the hairs on our bald heads. I hen the 

tney will soon be the same as the pas- ,. , 

senger pigeon, a thing of the past, the smart ones will say, why didn t someone 

same place all game will be in a few fay why did not we think of it. Well, 

more years if we are not allowed to here is to The Game Breeder and its 

progagate them. When I came to this editor, the magazine that has worked 

state, thirty years ago, prairie chickens for game breeding and fought for us 

were more plentiful on our prairies than ever since the first copy came from the 

blackbirds are today and they, the black- press. 



WILD-BRED AND HAND-REARED BIRDS. 

By The Editor. 

There are two methods of breeding know how on the comparatively small 

game-birds which are well Understood in rearing fields of the commercial game 

all countries where such birds always farms and shooting preserves. The stock 

are abundant. The hand-rearing, which pheasants and ducks are confined in 

may be described as the poultryman's closures where the numerous eggs are 

method applied to game, is commonly gathered and hatched under barn-yard 

used in the old countries to produce fowls or in incubators. The young 

pheasants and ducks. Easily these birds pheasants and ducks are raised in 

are bred in large numbers by those who rearing fields where numerous coops are 



44 



THE GAME BREEDER 



placed in long rows, each containing a 
hen and a brood of young birds, which 
are permitted to run about before the 
coop where the hen is confined. 

The wild-breeding methods are almost 
universally applied to partridges and 
grouse. This method consists of making 
the property, owned or leased by the 
game preserver, safe and attractive to 
the birds, which are permitted to nest 
in a wild state in the attractive and safe 
places provided for them by special 
plantings where such are needed to make 
the various fields attractive. 

Two- kinds of game keepers are re- 
quired for the two kinds of work. The 
men engaged in hand-rearing are busy 
during the breeding season about the 
hatching house, pens and rearing fields. 
When the young pheasants are able to 
fly well and are two-thirds or nearly 
full grown, often they are trapped and 
confined in pens. This is the method 
on foreign game farms where the birds 
are to be sold alive, and this is the meth- 
od of many shooting clubs in America 
where it is deemed desirable to confine 
the pheasants until the shooting season 
opens. For the shooting, a certain num- 
ber of birds are liberated, often on the 
day the shooting is to be done. Many 
pheasants would be lost to vermin in 
America if they should be taken to the 
coverts from the rearing fields and given 
their liberty some time before the shoot- 
ing season opens. 

The hand-reared pheasants often do 
not roost in trees and where they re- 
main on the ground at night they are an 
easy prey for ground vermin. In Amer- 
ica they also are in great danger from 
owls when they are induced to nest in 
the trees and, as I have observed, many 
of the clubs trap up their young pheas- 
ants on the rearing fields and hold them 
in pens (which are covered at the top) 
to protect them from their numerous 
enemies. 

The hand-reared ducks usually are 
taken from the rearing field to ponds 
where often they are protected by fences 
of chicken wire enclosing the pond and 
some adjacent land, or at least a part 
of the land. An island is attractive to 



ducks since they. are safe from ground 
vermin. 

• It has been found difficult often in the 
older countries, especially in countries 
where foxes are preserved for sport to 
turn down hand-reared pheasants in the 
coverts. The keepers usually see that 
the young birds quickly take to the trees 
at night. On some preserves I have been 
told brush is erected in the rearing fields 
to induce the young birds to form the 
habit of roosting above the ground. 

It would be difficult for a poultryman, 
in many places in America, to attempt 
to establish his poultry in fields and 
woods and to leave the birds out over 
night, and it is evident that hand-reared 
pheasants, although somewhat wilder 
than barn-yard fowls, are in danger of 
serious losses due to vermin when an 
attempt is made in America to distribute 
and establish them on the farm or coun- 
try estate. 

There are places in England where the 
pheasant has been established as a wild 
breeding bird and where no hand-rearing 
is done. 

Mr. Ogilvie Grant, an authority on 
English game birds, says there can be 
no doubt that if the pheasant were not 
artificially reared it would soon cease to 
exist, but Captain Aymer Maxwell in 
his excellent book on pheasants says the 
pheasant maintained its foothold in Eng- 
land for some fifteen hundred years 
without much assistance at the hands of 
man and that it is less than a century 
since the practice of -rearing pheasants 
became at all well known. 

He refers to places where pheasants 
are exclusively bred wild and where none 
are hand-reared, and publishes a letter 
from a preserve owner who describes 
how he manages to secure an average 
yield of 1,400 to 2,000 wild pheasants. 
Captain Maxwell says that special plant- 
ings are required and that the birds must 
be fed at certain seasons. 

On many English preserves some of 
the pheasants are left out throughout the 
year and many wild eggs are gathered 
from their nests and brought in to be 
hatched with the eggs gathered from the 
penned pheasants. It should be remem- 
bered always that ground and winged 



THE GAME BREEDER 



45 



vermin is closely controlled on the for- 
eign preserves and that many of the pre- 
serve owners are protected by neighbors 
who employ keepers to control the ver- 
min. 

Birds reared in a wild state arc much 
better equipped than hand reared birds 
are to escape their numerous enemies. 
From their earliest days they are taught 
by their parents how to be on their guard 
at all times and how to hide and to seek 
the protection of the briars when an 
enemy appears. Birds from preserves 
where vermin has been practically exter- 
minated are in great danger when they 
are liberated in places where vermin 
abounds. The innocent creatures, not 
having been taught to be always on their 
guard, fall an easy prey to foxes, hawks, 
owls and numerous other enemies, and 
their nests are robbed by numerous 
ground and winged robbers. 

The attempts made by individuals and 
by state game officers in America to es- 
tablish pheasants and gray partridges as 
wild breeding birds have often resulted 
in complete failures, largely because the 
birds do not know how to escape their 
enemies. They, of course, suffer addi- 
tional losses from shooting, legal and il- 
legal, and we have had many demonstra- 
tions of the entire disappearance of the 
birds from the places where they have 
been liberated. 

Where only a few birds are liberated 
it is evident to naturalists that they can 
not be expected to survive since nature's 
balance is against them at the start. The 
enemies are far too numerous when com- 
pared with the game and, of course, 
when the birds liberated are hand- 
reared, innocent creatures, no one 
should expect them to escape their 
enemies. 

Should a large number of birds be 
turned down on a compartively small 
area, some might survive and these nc 
doubt would be an illustration of the 
survival of the fittest. These birds hav- 
ing survived because they proved to be 
smart enough to escape their enemies, 
might breed and teach their young how 
to properly look out for the dangers of 
field and wood, and in time the land 
might become stocked with wild breed- 



ing birds. There can be no doubt that 
the best results have been obtained on 
ground where vermin has been controlled 
as far as possible by the persistent trap- 
ping, shooting and poisoning of the ene- 
mies of the game. But the preserve own- 
er who wishes to have wild breeding 
pheasants established on his property 
would do well to secure birds from a 
place where they have been bred wild 
and he certainly should have his ground 
well protected against vermin. The pro- 
tection must be continuous if he expects 
to see many birds on his ground. 

The hand-rearing keeper is simply a 
skilled poultryman, who knows how suc- 
cessfully to rear large numbers of game 
fowls on protected rearing fields where 
the young birds are shut up at night. 
He is usually a good trapper and a good 
shot. 

The keeper in charge of wild breeding 
birds is known as a beat keeper and his 
duties are to protect his wild breeding 
birds by patrolling his grounds, being 
ever on the look-out for the natural ene- 
mies of his game and poachers. He is 
always a skilled trapper and a good shot. 
Usually, we are glad to observe, he does 
not approve of poison, and he is able to 
get along without it. During the 
winter when snow is on the ground 
he is able to discover, easily, what 
ground enemies are about, and it is 
his business to reduce their numbers 
as far as possible. At all seasons he is 
quick to discover the work of vermin 
as he makes his rounds and he is espe- 
cially careful during the nesting season 
to. see that the nests of his birds are 
made as safe as possible and that the 
losses of the young birds when they are 
hatched are reduced to a minimum. 

Climate is something which he cannot 
control, of course, but he can do much 
to offset bad seasons by feeding his birds 
in winter and by inducing them to nest 
in safe places. He can suggest the 
planting of briars and other protecting 
covers and foods and often he removes 
the eggs from nests in very exposed sit- 
uations and places them in safer nests, 
or perhaps hatches some of them under 
barn yard fowls or in incubators. 

The grouse in the older countries are 



46 



THE GAME BREEDER 



usually bred wild. It has been found to 
be an easy matter for beat keepers to so 
protect the birds that quickly they be- 
come and remain as abundant as they 
should be on any area, although much 
shooting be done in the open season. 
Sometimes the birds become so abun- 
dant that they are subject to diseases; 
the remedy is, of course, to thin them 
out. 

The partridges, also, are bred wild in 
the fields and very little hand-rearing is 
ever attempted, and when it is done it 
is simply to supplement the main work 
of the wild-breeding keepers. 

There are two very good reasons why 
grouse and partridges should be bred 
wild in the fields. First, because this is 
the cheapest method and, second, be- 
cause it is the safest and best method. 

Should a lot of grouse or partridges 
be hand-reared and brought to maturity 
without any knowledge of their natural 
enemies and the dangers of the fields, 
they would suffer great losses when 
turned down to shift for themselves. It 
is evident that the feeding habits are 
quite different when birds are fed by 
hand in enclosures than they are when 
birds are required to glean in the fields 
and find their own living. 

Wild bred birds, widely distributed on 
a shooting area, are to my mind far more 
interesting than birds which are reared 
in enclosures. It certainly is not neces- 
sary to attempt to breed our grouse and 
quail in captivity, and there can be no 
doubt that this is the more expensive and 
often the most difficult way of producing 
sport, excepting, of course, where the 
birds are reared and penned to be liber- 
ated for the shooting. Should an at- 
tempt be made to restock any area with 
hand-reared quail and grouse I am in- 
clined to believe the undertaking would 
fail just as attempts to restock Ameri- 
can farms with gray partridges and 
hand-reared pheasants have failed. 
When wild breeding partridges have 
been procured and liberated, these, also, 
often have disappeared because they 
were too innocent to cope with our ver- 
min or were turned down in too small 
numbers to have any chance of becom- 



ing established. Sometimes when shoot- 
ing is prohibited they get a foothold and 
soon become abundant, but more often 
they become extinct. 

Hand-rearing produces such large 
numbers of ducks and pheasants quickly 
that it would seem to be more attractive 
than the attempts to establish wild breed- 
ing birds, which undoubtedly are fai 
more difficult to produce for shooting, 
provided the original stock be hand- 
reared. There are ways, however, of 
restocking areas with wild breeding 
American birds, and in fact vast num- 
bers now are produced and shot on many 
places in America where no coops or 
hens or incubators are ever used and 
where no artificial production of any 
kind is attempted. 

The owner of a country place, in my 
opinion, will have a far more interesting 
shooting provided a good part of his 
game be bred wild in the' fields, all over 
the place, than he will if he simply has 
an array of pens and inclosures and 
coops where thousands of birds are 
hand-reared. There can be no possible 
objection to having some hand rearing 
as a supplementary undertaking or to 
supply a lot of birds for some sure and 
easy shooting, but the places which en- 
tertain me best when I visit them are the 
places where there does not appear to 
be much game until a ramble in the fields 
with well trained dogs discloses its abun- 
dance, and, I may add, its natural wild- 
ness. I am pleased to observe that there 
are many places in America where 
American game has been made abun- 
dant. 



State Departments and Game Breeders. 

The live state departments which are 
trying to furnish some shooting on pub- 
lic lands are good customers of the game 
breeders, and are beginning to see that 
it is highly desirable to have places 
where they can secure ten thousand or 
more eggs or birds at attractive prices. 
Some of the commercial farms now sell 
upwards of twenty-five thousand eggs in 
a season. These, for the most part, are 
common duck and pheasant eggs. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



47 



PERMITS TO TRAP AND SELL WILD FOWL. 

[Many inquiries have been made concerning the methods of obtaining permits to trap and 
■sell wild fowl. Readers who have obtained applications for permits have not understood them 
or have been at a loss how to properly make them out. The confusion has resulted partly from 
the fact that two separate and distinct forms of application are issued and some of the require- 
ments can not possibly be complied with by most persons. Where the requirements are im- 
possible they seem to be in violation of Section 12 of the Migratory Bird law which was added 
to protect Game Breeders, and they are therefore void, and no attention should be paid to them. 
Some of the permits contain a clause prohibiting the applicant from shooting the ducks. This 
prohibition is in violation of Section 12 and is void on that account. The Biological Survey will 
issue a new permit to those holding permits preventing shooting and did so promptly when the 
Long Island Game Breeders Association notified the Survey of the error in the permit issued 
to the Association. Readers will find the followmg instructions sufficient to enable them to 
secure both permits where it is posible to do so. No charge is made for issuing them. — Editor.] 



How to Obtain Them. 

1. The application for permits should 
be addressed to Dr. E. W. Nelson, Chief 
of the Biological Survey, Washington, 
D. C. 

A simple letter saying: "Please send 
me the two applications for trapping and 
selling wild fowl," is sufficient. 

Upon receipt of this letter the depart- 
ment will send two forms for applica- 
tions which should he filled out by the 
applicant. 

One of these forms is for a permit to 
trap wild fowl ; the other is for a breed- 
er's permit permitting the breeding of 
the fowl and the sale of the birds for 
breeding purposes and for food, after 
they are shot. 

The two regulations under which per- 
mits are issued are as follows : 

Regulation 8. — Permits to Propagate 
and Sell Migratory Waterfowl. 

Paragraph 2 of Regulation 8 is amended so 
as to read as follows : 

2. A person authorized by a permit issued 
by the Secretary may possess, buy, sell, and 
transport migratory waterfowl and their in- 
crease and eggs in any manner and at any time 
for propagating purposes ; and migratory 
waterfowl, except the birds taken under para- 
graph 1 of this regulation, so possessed may 
be killed by him at any time, in any manner, 
except that they may be killed by shooting 
only during the open season for waterfowl in 
the State where taken, and the unplucked car- 
casses and the plucked carcasses, with heads 
and feet attached thereto, of the birds so killed 
may be sold and transported by him in any 
manner and at any time to any person for 
actual consumption, or to the keeper of a hotel, 
restaurant, or boarding house, retail dealer in 



meat or game, or a club, for sale or service to 
their patrons, who may possess such carcasses 
for actual consumption without a permit, but 
after midnight of March 31, 1919, no migratory 
waterfowl killed by shooting shall be bought 
or sold unless each bird before attaining the 
age of four weeks shall have had removed 
from the web of one foot a portion thereof in 
the form of a "V" large enough to make a 
permanent well-defined mark which shall be 
sufficient to identify them as birds raised in 
domestication under a permit. 

Regulation 9. — Permits to Collect 
Migratory Birds for Scientific 
Purposes. 

Regulation 9 is amended so as to read as 
follows : 

A person may take in any manner and at 
any time migratory birds and their nests and 
eggs for scientific purposes when authorized 
by a permit issued by the Secretary, which 
permit shall be carried on his person when he 
is collecting specimens thereunder and shall 
be exhibited to any person requesting to see 
the same. 

Application for a permit must be addressed 
to the Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, 
D. C, and must contain the following infor- 
mation : Name and address of applicant and 
name of State, Territory, or District in which 
specimens are proposed to be taken and the 
purpose for which they are intended. Each 
application shall be accompanied by certificates 
from two well-known ornithologists that the 
applicant is a fit person to be entrusted with a 
permit. 

The permit will authorize the holder thereof 
to possess, buy, sell, and transport in any 
manner and at any time migratory birds, parts 
thereof, and their nests and eggs for scientific 
purposes. Public museums, zoological parks 
and societies, and public scientific and educa- 
tional institutions may possess, buy, sell, and 
transport in any manner and at any time 
migratory birds and parts thereof, and their 
nests and eggs for scientific purposes without 



48 



THE GAME BREEDER 



a permit, but no specimens shall be taken with- 
out a permit. The plumage and skins of 
migratory game birds legally taken may be 
possessed and transported by a person without 
a permit. 

A taxidermist when authorized by a permit 
issued by the Secretary may possess, buy, sell, 
and transport in any manner and at any time 
migratory Ibirds and parts thereof legally 
taken. 

Readers will observe that the permits 
are fairly liberal in their terms and that 
they are intended to promote game 
breeding, "in order to increase our food 
supply," as Section 12 of the statute 
reads. 

In order to properly fill out the appli- 
cation for the permits to propagate and 
sell it is necessary to have two witnesses 
to the signature of the applicant, one of 
whom must be a public officer. The 
easiest public officer to secure, in most 
neighborhoods, is a Notary or Justice 
of the Peace, Town Clerk, Alderman or 
any person holding any public office. 
Politicians now are so numerous that 
it should be an easy matter to find one 
holding some public office. 

The second regulation, it will be ob- 
served, requires the applicant to secure 
certificates from two well known orni- 
thologists. The application blank con- 
tains a form which seems to require the 
ornithologists to state that they have 
known the applicant for .... years. 
The number of years to be filled in by 
the ornithologists. 

Since a great majority of game breed- 
ers live in the country, often on a rural 
delivery route, as their address on the 
index cards of The Game Breeder shows, 
it must be evident that in most cases 
there are not two (or even one) well 
known ornithologists within several hun- 
dred miles of their residences ; and we 
venture to say that not one game breeder 
in a thousand knows a well known or- 
nithologist or would know one if he saw 
him. The well known ornithologists are 
comparatively rare ; they are by no 
means as common as politicians, holding 
a public office, in any neighborhood. It 
would seem, therefore, that the appli- 
cant in most cases is required to perform 
an impossibility, and we doubt if the 
Congress had such performance in mind 



when it said that nothing in the act 
should prevent the breeding of game on 
game farms and preserves. It is quite 
important for breeders to have biras to- 
lay the eggs. We suggest that the regu- 
lations be amended. 

The regulations made by The Survey 
do not require a shooter to secure two- 
well known ornithologists to certify 
that they have known him for years be- 
fore ' he can destroy twenty-five wild 
ducks in a day. We hope the regula- 
tion can be amended so that those who 
wish to take twenty-five ducks or other 
wild fowl in a day can do so with as 
much freedom as is awarded to the de- 
stroyers. The game breeder who takes 
live ducks for breeding purposes should 
certainly have as much freedom as The 
Survey grants to destroyers. We suggest 
respectfully to The Survey that it read 
Section 12 of the law and consider if 
the regulation is a substantial compli- 
ance with its terms, which are expressed 
in no uncertain language. The regula- 
tions provide that state laws must be 
observed, and it is quite true that some 
states, many, in fact, are so far behind 
the times as to only permit the taking of 
wild fowl with shot-guns, and most of 
the birds so taken are not suitable for 
breeding purposes when Remington 
cartridges are used, as they are very 
largely. 

In New York it is now legal to trap 
birds for breeding purposes and, of 
course, since The Survey holds that 
state laws govern this subject no na- 
tional permits are necessary. Mr. Hen- 
derson, of The Survey, called our atten- 
tion, in sending a permit, to the fact that 
it did not permit the taking of wild fowl, 
and he evidently had the New York 
law in mind. We have no doubt that 
in states which properly permit the trap- 
ping of birds for breeding purposes The 
Survey is powerless to prevent the trap- 
ping for such purpose, since Section 12" 
of the law was made to cover such ac- 
tions. Any attempt to do so would be a 
flagrant violation of the law which says 
nothing in it shall be construed to pre- 
vent the breeding of game. When New 
York breeders are engaged in taking 
birds for breeding purposes they would" 



THE GAME BREEDER 



49 



resent any interference. Fortunately 
they are. not required to 'secure the aid 
of two well known ornithologists who 
have known them for years any more 
than the shooters are required to have 
such assistance. It would be a poor sam- 
ple of a sportsman who would say that 
a game breeder should have no birds to 
lay eggs for him. We are inclined to 
think that such a shooter is more rare in 
most neighborhoods than the well known 
ornithologists are. 

We sincerely hope that the regulations 
can be simplified and that the game 
breeders in all the states can be per- 
mitted to take all the birds they may 
need for breeding purposes. The prices 
of food are so high that there is no 
danger of any breeder taking more than 
he can use to advantage. Notwithstand- 
ing the difficulty, which is prohibitive in 
many neighborhoods, a good number of 
breeders have secured trapping permits 
and these, added to those who can oper- 
ate under state laws, can sell a large 
number of breeding fowls to those be- 
yond the reach of ornithologists. 

Readers who secure permits are ad- 
vised to examine them and see if they 
prohibit shooting. As originally printed 
this error appeared and although the 
provision is void, being a violation of 
the law, it is a good plan to return such 
permits and the survey promptly will 
correct them. 

There seems to be a disposition to 
treat game breeders fairly, but the sur- 
vey seems to have been badly advised 
when its regulations were made and pos- 
sibly the advisers were those who, to 
gain some private ends, were opposed 
to the protecting section added to the 
preventive law which made it highly 
permissive. We are quite sure it never 
could have been enacted had it not been 
repaired so as to give full protection to 
game breeders. 

A South Dakota reader, a capable 
game breeder, who inquired of his game 
warden how he could procure a permit 
to take birds alive for breeding purposes, 
since he prefers to produce ducks rather 
than to destroy them, was informed it 
would do no good to get a permit since 



the state law prevented taking fowl for 
breeding purposes. 

South Dakota, no doubt, has an in- 
telligent state game officer who is not 
opposed to food production on the farms 
and who will favor the amendment of 
the state law so as to permit the taking 
of birds for breeding purposes when his 
attention is called to the matter. If he 
should not do so the proper remedy is to 
retire the officer or to abolish the de- 
partment. A department of the state 
government which insists that no food 
can be produced by a farmer and no 
fowl can be taken for breeding purposes 
has no excuse for its existence, and the 
farmers and intelligent sportsmen quick- 
ly can bring about a change when their 
attention is called to the matter. 

An interesting case may be presented 
if a game breeder taking wild fowl un- 
der a national permit be arrested for so 
doing by a state officer who may believe 
that food production should be a crime 
and that the Congress had no right to 
make a law encouraging it. It will be 
interesting to learn what such an officer 
was doing during the war and how many 
of his associates put in their time pre- 
venting the production of food. The 
writer is a sportsman with a very wide 
acquaintance among sportsmen in many 
states. He has made numerous inquiries 
to see if he could find a sportsman who 
would say that it should be a crime to 
produce food on a farm. If any such 
there be, a letter from such an individual 
will be printed in The Game Breeder 
if sent to the office. 



Mexican Quail Survive a Blizzard. 

A big lot of Mexican quail arrived at 
the preserve of the Long Island Game 
Breeders' Association during a snow 
storm. Most of the birds, however, sur- 
vived and all are now in fine condition. 
If the breeding season is a good one a 
big lot of quail of several species will 
be produced and many will be harvested 
in the proper manner known to scientists 
who like shotguns and field shooting. 



50 THE GAME BREEDER 

NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 

Gambel's Quail Vanishing in New Mexico and Increasing in New York. 

The Hon. Thomas P. Gable, the newly been taken out. Some of the quail per- 
appointed State Game Warden for New ished. It was desired to procure a few 
Mexico, writes: "I am sorry that I will additional stock birds in order to con- 
be unable to comply with your request tinue the scientific work on a larger 
for quail and am obliged to return your scale this year. 

check. The hard cold winter was so se- The Long Island Association now has 
vere on the birds that in some localities the largest number of Blue Quail, Gam- 
they have been entirely depleted. I am bel's Quail and Bob Whites ever assem- 
making every effort to purchase fish and bled in America for experimental work, 
game for restocking this state, and now and it is to be hoped as the shooting fails 
have parties in El Paso and Mexico who in New Mexico it will be conducted on 
are trying to secure quail for me from an increasing scientific scale on many 
that locality. At present I cannot hold places associated with the Game Con- 
out any hope of shipping you quail from servation Society. 

this state ; in fact, there is no law author- Covies of Gambel's quail have been 

izing the game warden to sell quail or seen crossing the road some distance to 

ship them out of the state except for the east and also to the west of the 

scientific purposes." farms of the Game Breeding Associa- 

Our request for quail was for scien- tion, and beyond its boundaries. Nu- 

tific purposes. The birds were to be do- merous cats and other vermin also are 

nated to the Long Island Game Breeders' reported and the Association is collecting 

Association, where the most important these enemies by scientific methods. Al- 

scientific experiments ever undertaken though it is too early to say if the Gam- 

with quail are conducted. Gambel's bel's quail has been thoroughly estab- 

quail from New Mexico were bred sue- lished on Long Island, N. Y., and we 

cessfully on the farms of this Associa- fear the cats are too numerous when 

tion last year and the experiment in- compared with the game, it can not be 

eluded the most important part of such denied that the birds still occur, although 

experimental work, the harvesting of some scientific harvesting occurred last 

the crop, "by shooting." fall. It seems likely more birds will be 

What possibly can be more scientific produced this' summer and harvested 

than the transfer of quail long distances ; next autumn. By keeping the game laws 

the hatching of their eggs in incubators off of the farms and preventing the 

and under hens; the rearing of many enactment of the laws and regulations 

birds, and the harvesting of the food most fatal to all game (laws preventing 

crop in a highly scientific manner with shooting, which destroy the inducement 

the Parker and Remington guns and am- for production), the scientific character 

munition. The scientific experiment was of the work has been emphasized and 

even carried to the cooking and eating made known to many intelligent people, 

of the food in New York City, where We hope in time some of the game 

the serving of quail on toast has been breeding associations affiliated with the 

somewhat unusual : as we have pointed Game Conservation Society will be able 

out, the cooking of game properly is now to supply the State officer of New Mex- 

regarded as a science as well as an art. ico with quail and that he will not have 

The Association had some losses of to reach out and secure his birds in 
breeding stock. Thirty Gambel's quail Mexico, sending money abroad which 
were liberated by a cow which scratched should go to American farms. The 
open the door of their inclosure. The Game Conservation Society does not sell 
death of a game keeper left a lot of birds game in competition with the game farm- 
exposed in a pen, made especially un- ers who advertise in The Game Breeder, 
sanitary by a bantam which should have It is actively engaged .in creating new 



THE GAME BREEDER 



61 



shooting customers for the game 

farmers. 

♦ 

A Bird in the Hand Worth Two in 

the Bush. 

Howard Hettzer, of Hasbrouck 
Heights, New Jersey, is reported, in 
Sportsman's Review, to have flushed a 
woodcock when walking over a range 
where he was target shooting. The cock 
flew about thirty yards and hid in the 
grass. As he put his hand down the 
cock "scrambled along the ground," but 
allowed Mr. Hettzer to pick him up, 
which he could not account for. He re- 
leased the bird and it flew to the willows. 
That afternoon Mr. Hettzer went gun- 
ning and flushed the bird twice, but 
missed him, as the woodcock was very 
wild. The date of the occurrence is not 
given. The action of the bird would 
indicate that it might have had young 
birds or a nest. 



Canadian Ducks and Grouse. 

One of our Canadian readers says : 
"It would be no trouble to procure the 
different species of duck eggs if there 
should be a ready market for the same. 
The reason why I say this is, I wrote 
to several of the game preserves in your 
locality last fall about the sale of canvas- 
backs and mallards. The birds were 
hand-raised from incubator and brooder 
and the only reply I could get was the 
distance was too far for birds to travel. 
So I killed my mallards and a number of 
my canvasback, which I sincerely regret 
now, because I think if I had put my ad- 
vertisement in your paper I should have 
got results. But anyway, I shall do my 
best to secure some of the eggs you men- 
tion and to raise ducks for fall delivery. 
My space is limited, but if the orders 
should be such as to make it worth while 
I would devote my whole time to the 
business. I am going to try to raise a 
good number of sharp-tailed grouse and 
ruffed grouse this season. This will be 
my first experience in this line, but I 
am hoping for success. I will let you 
know the result." 

We have not had the opportunity to 
experiment with the grouse, but our 



numerous experiments with quail and 
the reports of many quail breeders indi- 
cate that great care is necessary in feed- 
ing the young birds. In a wild state the 
young upland game birds do not procure 
grain and the foods commonly used to 
hand-rear pheasants and ducks. There 
can be no doubt that the food of young 
grouse and quail consists very largely, if 
not entirely, of insects and green foods. 
The excellent bulletins of the late Dr. 
Judd are quite complete in so far as the 
food habits of old grouse and quail are 
concerned, but they are very incomplete 
concerning the food habits of young 
birds. An excellent field for scientific 
investigation remains open and it is to 
be hoped that the Biological Survey will 
investigate the food habits of young up- 
land game birds and report the result. 

It seems likely that many green weed 
seeds and small insects found in the 
grass are eaten by the young birds, 
since these are seasonable. Our obser- 
vations of quail in a garden indicate that 
the young birds are fond of small green 
weed seeds and the numerous insects 
found on the plants. Later the birds un- 
doubtedly add berries to their bill of 
fare, and we know, of course, that old 
birds eat the dry and hard weed seeds to 
be found in the autumn and also grain, 
which is seasonable and suitable for old 
birds. 

In the winter, when snow is on the 
ground, these birds eat the red hips of 
wild roses, sumac and dried berries 
which remain on tall briars and the 
seeds which fall from them. Undoubt- 
edly they eat many dried weed seeds 
when these can be found above the 
snow. 

We are inclined to believe that the 
best method of hand-rearing sharp-tailed 
grouse and the other grouse of the open 
country would be to let the young birds 
run with a bantam in a garden bordered 
with prairie grasses and that the best 
way to rear ruffed grouse would be to 
let the young birds run with a bantam in 
a safe wood where the natural foods of 
young grouse are abundant. Probably a 
little garden full of vegetables and weeds 
and berries might well be included in 
the range. The breeding ground should 



52 



THE GAME BREEDER 



be enclosed with wire netting and kept 
quiet and safe. All game enemies should 
be controlled and kept out. 

We especially want reports from our 
readers who experiment with grouse and 
quail. The safest, simplest and best way 
to breed these birds is, of course, on a 
large area which is made especially safe 
and attractive by planting briars and 
natural foods, including berries and 
grapes ; the birds being permitted to nest 
and rear their broods in a wild state. 
There is an old saying that "the par- 
tridge makes the best mother," and in 
the older countries grouse and partridges 
are bred wild and very little hand-rear- 
ing is attempted. 



Pheasants and Quail. 

A reader who called at the office of 
The Game Breeder recently reported 
the killing of a number of quail by a 
hen pheasant. 

Two winged quail, a cock and a hen, 
taken in the shooting field, were placed 
in a pen and the following summer four- 
teen eggs were discovered, from which 
nine quail were reared to maturity. On 
October 31, a hen pheasant which was 
on the place was trapped, in order to 
prevent its being shot by trespassers, 
and it was put in the pen with the quail. 
The following day the pheasant killed 
the two old quail and eight of the young 
ones ; only one quail remained alive. 

The question of introducing pheasants 
on quail preserves has been much dis- 
cussed, some preserve owners entertain- 
ing the opinion that the birds are not 
harmonious and that the pheasants are 
not desirable in fields where it is pro- 
posed to have an abundance of quail. A 
keeper at the Rassapreague Club many 
years ago told the writer that he had a 
good lot of quail at a time when he had 
several thousand pheasants, and in the 
winter he had observed repeatedly a big 
covey of quail feeding with the pheas- 
ants when he fed the last named birds. 
He said the birds appeared to get along 
nicely together. 

Upon another occasion a farmer on a 
large game preserve in New Jersey, 
where thousands of pheasants were 
reared, told the writer that he had seen 
pheasants chasing the quail in the corn, 



up one row and down another, as he 
said. 

I have observed on several preserves 
in which I am interested that the quail- 
liberated in good numbers near pheasant 
pens and rearing fields disappeared to a 
large extent, in some cases entirely, but 
I have never seen pheasants actually 
fighting or annoying quail. I formed 
the opinion that fields near enclosed 
rearing fields and pheasant pens and, in 
fact, near rearing fields for duck, were 
frequented by much vermin, attracted by 
the birds in the inclosures, arid for this 
reason the quail moved away. I would 
like to hear from readers who have 
pheasants and quail what they think 
about the matter. 



The Right Kind of Ammunition. 

The Game Conservation Society, 
through its numerous affiliated game 
breeding associatioris and game shoot- 
ing clubs, and the many game 
farmers, is responsible for the pro- 
duction of vast quantities of game. 
Some of the birds, of course, are 
taken by vermin, but immense num- 
bers are now shot. The sportsmen who 
shoot this game should always remember 
that it should be shot only with guns ' 
and ammunition advertised in The Game 
Breeder. The enthusiasm with which 
members of the Society pull together 
when game and eggs are purchased and 
sold, indicates that those who profit by 
the more game and fewer game laws 
movement and have good shooting will 
take our advice and support those who 
support the cause by advertising. A lot 
of ammunition is vised during the year 
on game farms and preserves to control 
vermin. Game keepers should see that 
they have the kind which helps to make 
their employment possible. 



More Praise. 

"Your good paper is either getting 
more interesting or else I myself am be- 
coming more appreciative ; perhaps I 
have stated the truth in both cases," 
writes one of our Colorado readers. 

It was a difficult matter during the war 
to improve The Game Breeder. Many 
who sent notes about their experiences 
quit doing so because they went abroad 



THE GAME BREEDER 



53 



as all our young men did. The new in- 
dustry has a boom now and the readers 
who contribute the most interesting mat- 
ter to the pages of the magazine will 
make their paper better than ever. There 
is so much freedom in some of the states 
that an immense amount of game soon 
will be produced and the states which 
appear to be far behind the times no 
doubt will wake up and get live game 
officers when the people see the game 
passing through in one direction and the 
money going through in the other direc- 
tion to the producers, and when the 
sportsmen hear how good the shooting 
is in the free states. We expect to ex- 
hibit the good shooting to some non-resi- 
dents in several places and to send them 
home prepared to get busy. 



The Long Island Game Breeders 
Association. 

The Long Island Game Breeders As- 
sociation now has a variety of state and 
national permits to possess and breed 
game and to trap birds for breeding pur- 
poses. 

The new game keeper, J. H. Wise, has 
had a wide experience, not only with 
pheasants and ducks, but also with 
American game birds on preserves in the 
South. Numerous cats and others have 
had good cause to regret his coming to 
Long Island. 

In a large number of aviaries the 
Scaled or Blue quail, Gambel's quail, 
Bob Whites and pheasants are in the 
pink of condition. Many hens already 
are setting on wild duck eggs in the 
hatching boxes in the orchard, and al- 
though the ducks are only a side line on 
this farm, which is devoted especially 
to quail and pheasants, it seems likely 
a few hundred wild duck will be raised. 

Some of the ducks which were in the 
habit of making long flights, remaining 
away for a day at a time, were trapped 
and clipped in order to see that they did 
not nest outside of the preserve. 

The Association undoubtedly has the 
largest collection of Scaled quail, Gam- 
bel's quail and Bob Whites ever assem- 
bled for hand-rearing purposes and since 
the quail left out after the shooting last 
season have evidently survived the win- 
ter and their natural enemies and are 



heard whistling on all sides, it seems 
likely that a good crop may be harvested 
in the proper manner and "not other- 
wise," next autumn. 

The special plantings of alternate 
strips of corn and buckwheat made the 
ground very attractive to the quail and 
many birds evidently wintered in a 
wild state quite near the house. 

The doves seem to be increasing in 
numbers and in fact coming back in 
good numbers and it is to be hoped be- 
fore long these excellent birds can be 
served on the club table and taken home 
as food. The martins are busy arranging 
their boxes ; the robins and bluebirds 
have arrived, and these will be followed, 
no doubt, by the meadow larks and nu- 
merous songsters and weed seed eaters 
which seem to respond better to practical 
game protection and an abundance of 
food than they ever were known to re- 
spond to numerous laws. The interest- 
ing work will be observed by many visi- 
tors during the breeding season. 



The Beneficial Owl. 

The game keeper of the Long Island 
Game Breeders' Association trapped a 
few dozen rats and mice and placed them 
on a bench in the barn which was closed 
for the night. In the morning all of the 
rats and mice excepting one were gone, 
A small window was open and he says 
the owls undoubtedly took the food. No 
cat or other animal could have taken the 
rats and mice since several dogs were 
sleeping in the barn, and the evidence 
seems conclusive that the beneficial owls 
were the visitors. Some screech owls 
live near the house and barn and are 
heard nightly. They are not molested 
since the game keeper agrees with us 
that they do not harm the game. These 
owls, no doubt, will increase in numbers 
since there seems to be no end to the 
rats and mice, which evidently come 
from neighboring places. 

■ ♦ — 

Small Hawks. 

The evidence in favor of the small 
owls is not so conclusive concerning the 
small hawks. Why these birds should 
sit on trees and apparently admire the 
quail in the aviaries if they have no in- 
terest in such birds is not apparent. A 



54 



THE GAME BREEDER 



few shots fired at them at long range 
sends them away unharmed and it may 
not be necessary to destroy them. Game 
keepers at a state game farm reported 
that the small hawks appeared to be as 
bad as the big ones, and it may be the)) 
quickly acquire perverted appetites when 
they are tempted with a good lot of 
young quail and pheasants spread out on 
a rearing field. 

Some years ago when visiting a pheas- 
ant preserve we heard the game keeper's 
. gun as we approached his rearing field 
and he picked up a small . hawk which 
had struck a young pheasant. He said 
the bird had been doing this daily for 
several days and that he decided to stop 
the performance. 

It seemed to us then that he was, or 
should have been, clearly within his 
rights as the shepherd who destroys a 
wolf is. It would be wise, undoubtedly, 
to make it legal everywhere for the 
game farmer to destroy enemies, when 
observed taking his game, and we think 
it decidedly wise for preserve owners 
and game farmers not to destroy the so- 
called beneficials when they appear not 
to be taking game. One thing is cer- 
tain, the hawks are wise birds and there 
is no danger of their all being destroyed. 



be made, no doubt, in June and later for 
$15 and possibly for $10 per hundred. 
We have records of some late sales as 
low as $10. It is a good plan to rear 
some late birds in addition to the early 
birds, and the performance is not so 
difficult as some seem to think it is. 



Market Prices. 



The prices for early pheasant eggs 
remained well up. Sales at $30 and $35 
per hundred were reported. Those who 
had their advertisements in early and 
were nearest to the best markets had the 
best results. Many people entertained 
the idea that eggs can not be shipped 
safely for long distances. We have rec- 
ords, however, of thousands of eggs be- 
ing shipped from New England to the 
Pacific coast, and many eggs now are 
shipped from the Western states to the 
Eastern states. We had very good re- 
sults with eggs which we purchased in 
England for our experimental work. If 
eggs will stand the railway journey to 
the ship and the sea voyage it would 
seem that they should stand a long jour- 
ney by rail, provided they be properly 
packed and properly handled. 

The common price for pheasant and 
duck eggs is $25 per hundred for early 
eggs, $20 for later eggs, and sales will 



Quail and Quail Eggs. 

Quail eggs have been selling for about 
twice as much as pheasant and duck 
eggs. Since quail are small eaters when 
compared with the larger birds, and 
since they lay numerous eggs when 
penned, it is evident that the quail are- 
very profitable. Mexican quail sold at 
$18 to $24 per dozen for bob whites. 
Scaled quail sold for $15 to $24 per 
dozen and there was a demand for hun- 
dreds of thousands of quail which could 
not be filled. Owners of northern quail 
did not need any advertising to sell all 
the birds and eggs they wished to sell. 
Some entertained the opinion that, it 
might not be wise to advertise just yet, 
since some game wardens do not seem to 
yet know the difference between quail 
owned by individuals and quail owned 
by the state. In time, like Sunday fish- 
ing in New York, the quail industry will 
be so common that the laws which might 
appear to prevent it will be repealed. 
♦ 

New York Laws and Federal 
Regulations. 

Dr. Nelson, chief of the Biological 
Survey, writes : 

"The provisions of the Federal regula- 
tions closely follow the provisions of the 
New York statute, with which you prob- 
ably familiar. We refer you to Rule 
VII, Section 33, of the Rules and Regu- 
lations of the Conservation Commission 
of New York, found at page 147 of the 
compilation of the Fish and Game Code. 
This rule does not specifically provide 
that the mark of identification shall be 
shaped in the form of a "V," but we 
understand that the "V" shaped mark 
has been universally adopted in the state. 
The New York statute also provides 
that ducks so killed shall be tagged un- 
der the supervision of the Conservation 
Commission. The provisions of the 
New York statute, as well as those of 
the Federal Regulations, of course, must 
be complied with. There is no conflict 



THE GAME BREEDER 



55 



between the rules of the State Commis- 
sion and the provisions of the Federal 
Regulations, but the state rules contain 
requirements that are not mentioned in 
the Federal Regulations. 
■ Under the Federal Regulations no 
wild ducks that have been captured for 
propagating purposes can be killed or 
sold for food purposes, but may be sold 
only for propagating purposes under 
Federal permits and in accordance with 
state laws. The increase from such 
captured wild ducks may be killed and 
sold as provided by the Federal Regu- 
lations and in accordance with state 
laws. 

The Bureau has been preparing a draft 
of an amendment of Regulation 8 pro- 
viding for the tagging of wild ducks that 
have been captured for propagating 
purposes and wild ducks raised in do- 
mestication. The provisions of this ten- 
tative amendment are not onerous, but 
are designed to place a reasonable check 
on the traffic in order that ducks cap- 
tured for propagating purposes and 
those raised in domestication may be dis- 
tinguished from wild birds. 

For your further information we take 
pleasure in sending herewith a memo- 
randum which explains the scope and 
application of the present Federal Reg- 
ulations with respect to propagating 
migratory waterfowl and the authority 
conferred by Federal propagating per- 
mits." 

Breeders can get full information 
about the Federal Regulations and the 
game laws of their states which relate to 
wild ducks by writing to the Biological 
Survey, Washington, D. C. 

MEMORANDUM 

Relating to permits authorizing traffic in 

migratory waterfowl and their eggs for 

propagating purposes. 

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of July 3, 
1918, provides that: 

"It shall be unlawful to hunt, take, capture, 
kill, attempt to take, capture or kill, possess, 
offer for sale, sell, offer to purchase, purchase, 
deliver for shipment, ship, cause to be shipped, 
deliver for transportation, transport, cause to 
be transported, carry or cause to be carried by 
any means whatever, receive for shipment, 
transportation or carriage, or export, at any 
time or in any manner, any migratory bird, 
included in the terms of the convention be- 
tween the United States and Great Britain for 



the protection of migratory birds concluded 
August sixteenth, nineteen hundred and six- 
teen, or any part, nest, or egg of any such 
bird." 

No migratory waterfowl or their eggs can 
be taken, possessed, sold, purchased, shipped, 
or transported for propagating purposes ex- 
cept as specifically permitted by Regulation 8 
of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act Regulations. 
This includes migratory waterfowl held by any 
person on July 3, 1918. 

Two forms of permits are provided. A per- 
mit issued pursuant to paragraph 3 of Regula- 
tion 8 should be applied for on form Bi-279 
and will authorize a person to take a limited 
number of wild migratory waterfowl and their 
eggs, and to traffic in such birds and eggs and 
in other migratory waterfowl and their eggs 
solely for propagating purposes. THE WILD 
BIRDS SO TAKEN CANNOT BE KILLED, 
NOR CAN THEY BE SOLD OR TRANS- 
PORTED EXCEPT FOR PROPAGATING 
PURPOSES AND THEN ONLY TO A 
PERSON HOLDING A FEDERAL PER- 
MIT. The permit will not authorize any 
migratory waterfowl to be killed and trafficked 
in for food purposes. 

A permit issued pursuant to paragraph 2 of 
Regulation 8 should be applied for on Bi-281 
and will authorize the permittee to possess, 
purchase, sell and transport for propagating 
purposes migratory waterfowl, their increase 
and eggs, lawfully taken and possessed, and to 
kill birds raised in domestication and to sell 
and transport their carcasses for food pur- 
poses as provided in said Regulation 8. Such 
permit does not authorize the taking of wild 
migratory waterfowl for any purpose. 

Migratory waterfowl lawfully taken and pos- 
sessed under these permits may be used and 
transported for ornamental, exhibition, and 
decoy purposes. 

These Federal permits do not authorize 
migratory waterfowl to be taken, possessed, 
or trafficked in contrary to state laws, and all 
persons are cautioned to comply with the pro- 
visions of state laws before operating under 
Federal permits. 

Reports of operations under these permits 
must be furnished during the month of Jan- 
uary next following their issuance as required 
by paragraph 5 of Regulation 8. 

For further information in regard to Federal 
game laws apply to Biological Survey, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 



The Time to Advertise. 

Many game breeders delay sending in 
their advertisements offering eggs until 
the birds begin to lay. This is a mis- 
take. The people who want a big lot of 
eggs begin inquiring for them early and 
those who keep their advertisements 
standing get the best results, of course. 



56 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, MAY, 1919. 
TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountriesand Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 

E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



MORE LAWS. 

More laws and more litigation evi- 
dently have been secured by the Game 
Protection Association during the last 
winter months. We sincerely hope that 
the Migratory Bird Law may be de- 
clared constitutional provided the court 
can say that wild migratory birds not 
owned and branded by game breeders 
are owned by the nation and a proper 
subject for national police regulation. 

The ample protection given to game 
breeders by Section 12 of the law; the 
evident intention of the Biological Sur- 
vey to permit the trapping of wild fowl 
for breeding purposes and the shooting 
of big bags of game by game breeders, 
and the sale of the abundant game as 
food under proper regulations (which 
in time can be made very simple), make 
it desirable that wild fowl should be 
governed by the national law and not by 
the ever changing state enactments. 

It certainly is a hardship for game 
breeders to be forced to comply with 
two sets of laws and regulations ; to 
have state officers and national officers, 
both requiring the tagging and branding 
of the food before it can be marketed, 
and to have state officers and national 
officers inspecting the breeding plants 
and requiring reports of the game pro- 
duced and sold. 

There are many thousands of game 
breeders. Some have only a few birds. 
In the Middle West it was a common 



sight, before the numerous laws were 
enacted, to see a few tame green-heads, 
or mallards, in the barnyards. ''We have 
seen many Canada geese on the western 
farms, and if the farmers be required to 
pay for licenses and to tag. and brand 
their fowls and to make -reports to the 
state and to the nation about what they 
are doing with a few pairs of tame 
ducks or geese, the result will be that 
they will eat the birds and have nothing 
on the farms to tempt state and national 
officers to make arrests, because breed- 
ing fowls are "in their possession." 

When Iowa enacted a law requiring a 
$2.00 license for game breeders, many 
farmers who had tame mallard did not 
apply for licenses, and it hardly seemed 
to be good politics to arrest them be- 
cause they had barnyard ducks before 
the law was enacted. 

The correct way to handle the whole 
subject is to let any farmer or other 
land owner have' a qualified ownership 
in the game he produces, wild or tame, 
on his farm. The ownership practically 
is absolute so long as the game remains 
on the farm, since the trespass laws pre- 
vent anyone from taking the game. The 
ownership of game, at the common law, 
is said to be a qualified ownership, since 
game often departs from places where 
it is produced abundantly, and the own- 
ership is then lost and the game cannot 
be followed and taken in replevin be- 
cause it cannot be identified. The place 
to regulate the sale of game is not on the 
farms but in the market. Producers 
should not be licensed and annoyed by 
numerous laws, regulations and officers. 
The game dealers should be licensed 
and regulated and ample records can be 
required from them. 



A Uniform Law for Massachusetts. 

Mr. Bailey of Danbury has prepared 
a bill providing for a uniform fishing 
season. The numerous laws opening 
and closing the fishing season on various 
ponds are wrong, of course. They are 
the direct result of the appetite for legis- 
lation to which often we have referred. 
Local protective associations continually 
run to the legislative assemblies seeking 

(Continued on page 5o.) 



THE GAME BREEDER 



57 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE TOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 



R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 




F.B.DUSETTE& SONS' GAME RANCH 

BAD AXE, MICH. 



BREEDERS OF: 



Pure Wild Mallards, Black Ducks, 
Wild Turkeys and Bob White Quail 



Our game is grown on our 240- Acre Ranch, with natural feed on 
our Several Lakes, which makes our stock very attractive for 
Breeders, Shooting Clubs and Preserve Owners at a minimum 
price. Our birds comply with the Federal regulations which 
permit shooting and sale. 

Contracts Now Open for August and September 
'- No Eggs for Sale This Season 

F. B. DUSETTE & SONS, BAD AXE, MICH. 



58 



I HE GAME BREEDER 



IS- 








FENCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The_ accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable ! 
" RIOT" fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
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We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
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Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
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Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
ennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 

J. M. DOWNS 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 




•f T^^r •- ' 






- -2^-i 






*v ■ ■ ■■< 







RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE: CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 

extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



THE HONEYSWEET 

BLACK RASPBERRY 

Best for Home and Market 

The bushes make good cover for game. 

Strawberry and Asparagus Plants. 

Price Lists Free. 

A. B. KATKAMIER MACEDON, IN. Y. 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, HI. 



jgL 


BOOK ON 


$Sm&> 


DOG DISEASES 


■ y$*TJr 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 


Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys ( including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year. 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S., 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

155ft Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for Mora Gam*." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



59 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds; 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America wiih pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all wattrs. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen w ho wish to shoot wild geese. Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



J. B. WHITE 



(Continued from page 56.) 

to procure new laws relating to fish and 
game, but they seem to overlook the fact 
that they would fare better if they would 
put in part of their time and money in 
providing more fish and more game. As 
we have pointed out, the game law in- 
dustry results in the people getting 
what they go after — more laws ; but we 
are glad to observe the increasing num- 
bers of people who are associating to 
secure more game and more fish. The 
result is, of course, more shooting and 
more fishing. 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, Circu- 
lation, Etc., Required by the Act of Congress of 
August 24, 1912, of the Game Breeder published 
monthly at New York, N. Y., for April 1, 1919. 
State of New York, County of New York, ss. — 
Before me, a notary public in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared D. W. Hunting- 
ton, who, having been duly sworn according to law, 
deposes and says that he is the Editor of the Game 
Breeder and that the following is, to the best of his 
knowledge and belief, a true statement of the owner- 
ship, management (and if a daily paper, the circu- 
lation), etc., of the aforesaid publication for the 
date shown in the above caption, required by the Act 
of August 24, 1912, embodied in section 443, Postal 
Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this 
form, to wit: 1. That the names and addresses of 
the publisher, editor, managing editor, and business 



managers are : Publisher, The Game Conservation 
Society, Inc., Post office address, 150 Nassau St., 
New York, N. Y. Editor, D. W. Huntington, ISO 
Nassau St., New York. N. Y. Managing Editor, none. 
Business Managers, The Game Conservation Society, 
Inc., 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 2. That the 
owners are: (Give names and addresses of individual 
owners, or if a corporation, give its name and the 
names and addresses of stockholders owning or hold- 
ing 1 per cent or more of the total amount of stock.) 
The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 150 Nassau St., 
New York, N. Y. Stockholders: C. B. Davis, Grant- 
wood, New Jersey; A. A. Hill (deceased); F. R. 
Peixotto, 55 John St., New York, N. Y.; John C. 
Huntington, U. S. Transport Ship Siboney in service; 
D. W. Huntington, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y.; 
D. W. Huntington, Jr., 150 Nassau -St., New York, N. 
Y.; H. H. Shannon, Great Neck Station, New York. 3. 
That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other 
security holders owning or holding 1 per cent or more 
of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities 
are: (If there are none, so state.) None. 4. That 
the two paragraphs next above, giving the names of 
the owners, stockholders, and security holders, if any, 
contain not only the list of stockholders and security 
holders as they appear upon the books of the company 
but also, in cases where the stockholders or security 
holders appears upon the books of the company as 
trustees or in any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom such trustee 
is acting, is given; also that the said two paragraphs 
contain statements embracing affiant's full knowledge 
and belief as to the circumstances and conditions under 
which stockholders and security holders who do not 
appear upon the books of the company as trustees, 
hold stock and securities in a capacity other than that 
of a bona fide owner; and this affiant has no reason to 
believe that any other person, association, or corpora- 
tion has any interest direct or indirect in the said 
stock, bonds, *or other securities than as so stated by 
him. D. W. Huntington, Editor. Sworn to and sub- 
scribed before me this 1st day of April, 1919. George 
F. Bentley. Notary Public. (102) New York County. 
(seal). (My commission expires March 30, 1920.) 



60 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE 



It Is Now Legal to Trap Wild 
Fowl for Breeding Purposes 

Write to The Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, for information about Trapping Permits 

The book, OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS, written by the 
Editor of The Game Breeder, contains full information about the 
trapping of wild fowl and how to rear the birds for profit and 
for sport. There are chapters on How to Form Shooting Clubs ; 
How to Control the Enemies of Wild Fowl, etc. Fully illustrated 
with pictures of ducks on preserves, etc. 

PRICE, $2.00 POSTPAID 

THE GAME BREEDER, 1 50 Nassau St., NEW YORK 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 




Decoy Owls for Crow and Hawk Shooting 
Established 1860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

rRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America. 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers plea*e mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



61 




PURE. BR.SD W)U>.;TU2e.sr, 



We Arc Now 

Booking 

Orders for 

Eggs 

for Spring Delivery from the following vari- 
eties of pheasants : Silver, Golden. Ringneck, 
Lady Amherst, Formosan. White, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Swinhoe, Versicolor. Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchunan Eared, Melanotus, Black- 
throated Golden, Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, Long- 
tails, and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff Orping- 
ton and R. I. Red fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan and Fancy Ducks, 
Doves of several varieties. Deer. Jack 
Rabbits 

Send $1.00 in stamps for Colortype Catalogue 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 

WILD AND BRONZE TURKEY EGGS. PARCEL, 

Post Prepaid. VALLEY VIEW FARM, Bellevilles 

Pennsylvania. It 

PHEASANTS WANTED 
I will buy ringnecked pheasants regardless of sex at 
long as they are strong, healthy birds, large and no 
over two years old. Will purchase small or large num- 
bers for cash. Reference by permission to the Game 
Breeder. ROBT. BOWMAN, care Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

BANTAMS — GOOD GENTLE BIRDS .SUITABLE 
for quail and pheasant breeding JOHN E. DARBY, 
Prop., Maplehurst Poultry Farm, Croswell, Michigan. 

BANTAMS — WIL BERT'S FAMOUS BANTAMS. 
Forty varieties. Shipped on approval. Catalog 3£. 
F. C. WTLBERT, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



WANTED 

Twenty=Five Sportsmen 

to join me in an exclusive hunting 
and fishing club. Property in Orange 
and Sullivan Counties, N. Y., adjoin- 
ing the Hartwood Club, the Merrie- 
wold Club and the famous Chester 
W. Chapin game preserve. For par- 
ticulars, apply to 

J. S. HOLDEN, PORT JERVIS, N.Y 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 
Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



EGGS 



HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG50PAGE CATALOGUE 
102. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky . 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky.. 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
L a year. 



TWO THOUSAND PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. 
Pure Chinese, $3.50 per dozen. Ringnecks, Golden, 
Silver and Mallard Duck, $3.00 per dozen. 120.00 per 
hundred. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL FARM, 
Manzanita, Oregon. 4t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. $25.00 

per 100. Golden Pheasant Eggs, 60c. each. Day old 

Pheasants, 60c. each. Booking orders now. Mrs. EDGAR 

TILTON. Suffern, N. Y. gt 

STOCK AND EGGS OF RINGNECKS, LADY 
Amherst, Golden and Silver Pheasants. Wild strain 
Mallards. Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams. 
" Ringlet" Barred Plvmouth Rock Chickens. Peafowl. 
MRS. IVER CHRISTENSON, Jamestown, Kansas. 
No. 1. 6t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



62 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS ' 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 
Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 

Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 

REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

Member of the Game Guild. 

PHEASANT EGGS AND PHEASANTS 

Pheasant eggs for sale up to 
May 15, $25.00 per hundred. 
110 eggs sent for cash with 
order after .May 15, $20 per 
110 eggs. Pheasants for Sep- 
tember and October delivery. 
Write for prices. GEORGE 
BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
R No. 1, Englishtown, New 
Jersey. 



LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 





WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, ■ Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinweod, Kansas 




Mallard-Pintail 



DARK MALLARD 

Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 

These ducks are reared on free range 
especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.60 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



__ . 




- 








^t-^isiSfc 






r- 






BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Qifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all, of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 

BALDWIN PALMER 
Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 

ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, ' ' 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gam« ' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



63 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
IMorthport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WILD MALLARD DUCKS 
AND EGGS 

Birds Strong Flyers, Manitoba Stock 

Eggs - - Per hundred, $20.00 
Ducks - - - Per pair, 3.50 

HEMLOCKS GAME FARM 

Box 1011 

Bridgeport, Conn. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 

Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 




HOYT'S CALIFORNIA PHEASANTRY, PRICE LIST 
FRED D. HOYT, Hayward, California. 


per clutch. Cash with "rder. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, Nortn Carolina. 8t 




GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure hrand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 21 Ward St., Orange, N. J. 


RABBIT AND HARK SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 




7 OR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
sheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
rersey. (iot) 


FOX AND MINK WANTED 

Wanted — Hair red fox pups; also bieeders; pair mink 


and marten R. H. BARKER, 2034 East Fourth Si., 
Cleveland, Ohio. It 


t>UAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue 
WM. J MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
intry and Game Park. 


LIVE GAME 


AMHERST, REEVES, SILVER AND MONGOLIAN 
Pheasant eggs $5.00 a dozen, two dozen, $9.00. Chinese 
Ringnecks, $3 50 a dozen, $2500 a hundred. Mongolians, 
S35. 00 a hundred "Pheasant Karmirg," illustrated. 50c. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 2 t 


CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
jreedint; this stecies. We are the oldest and largest 
Dreeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
swans. Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 


WANTED TO BUY PHEASANTS I WANT 
Silvers. Lady Amherst. Golden and Reeves. 
Quote Prices, Ages, and Quantity. 
Morgan's. Phsntry, 244 E. 61st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County. Pa. 


FOR SALE— PHEAbANTS, PEA FOWL, PIGEONS, 
Poultry, Bantams and Pit Games Eggs from the 
above stock for sale. Rabbits, Cavies, Squirrels, fur 
bearing animals, etc. I buv, sell and exchange. L L 
KIRKPATRICK, Box 273, Bristol. Tenn. 


PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
chunan Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3t 


WANTED—WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX 
Pied Peafowl Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling. Ky. 


GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 
fifty cents a piece. FOXHOLLOW FARM, Rhine- 
beck, New York. It 


Pheasants Wanted 


PHEASANTS AND EGGs FOR SALE. GOLDENS 

Lady Amhersts, Versicolors, Manchurian Eared. Gold, 

en Eggs $5.00, and Lady Amherst $7.00 per dozen- 

ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, Canada. 2t 


WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. gt 



in writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



64 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. . The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FIVE VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. WILD DUCKS. 

Wild Geese, Brants. Wild Turkeys and other Game, 

List for stamp. G. H HARRIS, Taylorville, Illinois. 4 t 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— FOR FANCY DUCKS, 
geese or pheasants. 15 pair of 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds. Ducks $8.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton, Ohio. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS FOR SALE. LARGE, HARDY 

specimens. Satisfaction guaranteed. LEWIS 
COMPTON, Dias Creek, New Jersey. 2t 



HAVE SIX MALE CANVASBACKS FOR SALE, 
$10.00 each or will exchange for wood duck pairs. 
These are hand raised from pure wild stock, Have a few 
canvasback eggs for sale, $12.00 oer dozen. A. WOLFE, 
9848 76th Ave., Edmonton, S., Aiberta, Canada. It 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE, THE GREATEST 

rabbit for flesh and fur in the world. Send for full 

information and price list. SIBERIAN FUR FARM, 

Hamilton, Canada. 6t 



EGGS 

PHEASANT EGGS — RINGNECK, $2.50 PER 13. 

Wild Mallard Eggs. $1.50 per U. JOHN SAMMONS, 

Yankton, South Dakota. 2t 

GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS, $5.00 per dozen. Cash 
with order. F. W. DANE, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD DUCK EGGS FOR SALE— 
From my New Jersey farm, pure bred, light gray wild 
mallard duck eggs. Stock strong on wing. $3.50 per 13 ; 
$25.00 per 100. H. W. VAN ALEN, 215 Montague St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. at 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



IF YOU WOULD BE SUCCESSFUL IN RAISING 
a high per cent of your baby birds — quail, pheasants, 
wild turkeys, etc., feed them meal worms, a choice, clean, 
insect food. 500, $1.00 ; 1,000, $1.50 ; 5,000, $5.00. Express 
prepaid. See last year's advertisements in April, June 
and August numbers. C. R. KERN, Mount Joy, Penn- 
sylvania. 2t 



GAMEKEEPERS 

GAMEKEEPER AT LIBERTY. RELIABLE, WANTS 
position on club preserve or game farm. Experienced 
on game and ornamental birds or animals, gun dogs and 
extermination of vermin. MILTON, ia care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 



WANTED — POSITION AS- MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., caie of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. THOR- 

oughly experienced in rearing Pheasants. Wild Turkeys 

and Wild Ducks. Good references. GAMEKEEPER, 

463 East 57th St., N. Y. C. it 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES POSITION. LIFE Ex- 
perience, excellent references. Age 40. Married. 
RALPH LEE, Bernardsville, New Jersey. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

MEDICAL PLANTS — THIS BOOK DESCRIBES 
fully the 400 most valuable roots, herbs, etc., used in 
medicine, perfumes, coloring and dyestuffs ; tells the exact 
time to gather each, how to prepare for market and ad- 
dresses of 25 large dealers that buy and pay top prices. 
Postpaid only 20)2. FOREST PRODUCTS CO., 

West Milan, N. H. It 



BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes. 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared, 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 

WANTED-PARTYTO TAKE HALF INTEREST IN 

a well established wild fowl farm. Address "OWNER," 

care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. it 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house ol six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



In writing' to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 





Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 &1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest order* for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
che large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can suppb 
these birds in good numbers to Stat« 

Depirtment^ and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental nirds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 be»i 
Royal Swans of England I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very laree Europaai 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PRAKOWX. fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain ova 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTb. All stock is kept under oractically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before ouying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am nniv fiO miles from New York and 3<> miles from Philadeiohia 

WM J. MACKENSEN 

Department V. YARDLEY. BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game GuaU 





Game Farm or Preserve 



A large tract of land suitable for a game farm or 
preserve is offered for sale at an attractive price. 

The land is near New York on a good Automobile 
Road and contains a large pond and stream. There 
are some trout and the waters can be made to yield 
large numbers of these fish. The land is suitable for 
deer, upland game and wild ducks. I shall be pleased 
to show this property to anyone wishing to start a 
game farm or preserve. 

The place is within fifty miles of the City and can be 
reached by Automobile in an hour and a half. 

For particulars address, 

===== OWNER ============= 



Care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York 



rtf.U'j 



#>l°o PerYear 



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BD 



Single Copies 10 <M 



liiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii! 



THE- 



G AH E BR 





VOL. XV 



JUNE, 1919 



< i /\ 





The Object op this magazine- is 
to Make North Am erica the 5iogest 
Game Producing Country in the Would 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — The Aeroplane Sport— Game Breeders in 
Colorado— Why Any Penalty?— The Sale of Game in Quebec — 
A Punch for Branding Young Ducks — Again the Crow !— Wanted 
a Permit — Conflict About Permits— More Laws— Wild Ducks in 
Minnesota. 

Reflections on Game Breeding - - - Aldo Leopold 
Some Black Ducks Hatched in an Incubator Z. Ted DeKalmar 
Rabbit Growing to Supplement the Meat Supply Ned Dearborn 
More Game and Fewer Cats - Massachusetts Commission 
How to Make a Duck Pond -'-'..-- C. B. McGee 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - By Our Readers 
Prize Quail — More Prize Quail — Periods of Incubation— 
Turkey Hen as Foster Mother — More Quail Wanted— More 
About the Massena Quail — Decoy Owls — Movements of 
Keepers — Crows — More Quail — Unsatisfactory Records — 
Record of Mr. Perry— Moose and Wolf— What It Costs — 
Not Otherwise —Wild Breeding Ducks — A Failure to Fer- 
tilize — A Big Game Ranch. 
Editorials — Back to the Land —A Feeling in the Bones— Our 
Desire to Be Helpful— Beware of the Cat. 



Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July q, 1915, at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 




minium 



*~n HY= ~-t 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIErTY. Inc. 

MEW YORK CITY U.S.A f£»av/j~ts 



11 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiHifiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJininimniiiiiiii. 




No. 3 




ftSi 



SPRATT'S 

■ . — r-— "' — 

Pheasant Food 
No. 3 




Is rich in ingredients composed of and supplying carbo- 
hydrates and frame-building elements and which are very 
easily assimilated into the system. 

Being a cooked food, it is part predigested. It is best 
prepared with hot water, and then allowed to cool, feeding 
it to the birds as the warm soft food. 
The natural adjuncts to this highly vitalizing meal are 

SPRATT'S CRISSEL 

a perfect substitute for insect life and Ants' Eggs and the 
purest form of meat obtainable. 

SPRATT'S Cardiac or Game Spice 

which contains valuable stimulating and appetizing properties and 
should be added to staple food during raw and inclement weather, and 

SPRATT'S PHEASANTIINA 

a fine mixture of choice meals scientifically blended to supply the 
elements necessary for the formation of bone, body and muscle. It 
can also be used as an appetizer when the birds are off their feed. 

WE ALSO MANUFACTURE THE FOLLOWING : 
SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL NO. 12 (For Pheasants, Partridge and 

Quail Chicks). 
SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL NO. 5 (For Young Pheasants). 
SPRATT'S MAXCO (The most nourishing food obtainable). 
SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MEAL (The best food for ducklings). 




Send 25c. for "Pheasant Culture." 



"Poultry Culture" sent on receipt of 10c. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

(NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



THE GAME BREEDER 



65 



HERCULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 




INFALLIBLE 



«4 



e. cr 



In the Right Direction 

The sportsman who begins his 
day by buying shells loaded with 
Infallible or "E.C ." has started 
on the highroad toward success 
in the field or at the traps. 

Many veteran sportsmen shoot only Her- 
cules Smokeless Shotgun Powders. These 
men are old hands at the game and know 
that if they expect success they must use 
powders that are dependable — that always 
give high velocity with light recoil and 
even patterns. And they know that they can 
always depend upon Infallible or E. £" 

You can profit by their experience by 
buying shells loaded with one of these 
powders. Any one of the fourteen stand- 
ard brands of shells listed here can be 
bought loaded with a Hercules Smoke- 
less Shotgun Powder. When you buy 
shells, look on the end of the box or on 
the top wad of the shell for the name 
Infallible or "E. C." Start now in the 
right direction by using Hercules Smoke- 
less Shotgun Powders. 

JjL HERCULES POWDER CO. 
M" 61 West 10th Street 

(J£j Wilmington Delaware 



THE RIGH 
DIRECTION 




2 



8H 

HIGH GUN 
PREMIER 





UUP 

IDEAL 
TARGET 





APROW 
NITRO CLUB 




SELBY LOADS 

CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 





(g) \BLACK SHELLS 



AJAX 
CLIMAX 





FIELD 
RECORD 





Winchester 



REPEATER 
LEADER 





66 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Let your trap gun purchase be a PARKER. 
Be one of the thousands of satisfied PARKER 
Gun users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. Th e 
purchaser of a PARKER Gun receives in good sub- 
stantial gun value, the benefits of experience in gun 
manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never 
be satisfied with anything but the BEST. X* A t» IT IT T3 TEX TO f\ « 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not " A KtVJ^K OKUd. 

now? Master Gun Makers MERIDEN, CONN.. U. S. A. 

Send for catalogue and free booklet about 20 bore guns. New York Salesrooms, 25 Murray Street 



]M allarxl^ , 


Teal, 


Quail 


J»I>arxe 


sse^^ilkie^ 


Pure-bred Birds Raised Under Semi-Natural Conditions 


Z. TED DeKALMAR, R. 


r. D. No. 30, 


Stamford, Conn. 


STATE GAME LICENSE No 123. FEDERAL 


PERMIT No. 1. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 



Ringnecks Chinese Reeves Golden 

Silver Amherst Japanese Silky Fowl 

Book your order for eggs now. Eggs in any quantity from the 
Japanese Silky — Rhode Island Red Cross. The perfect mother 
tor large breeders of Pheasants. 

We have one of the largest exclusive Game Breeding Farms in the U. S., and we 
warrant every bird we ship to be in prime condition for breeding or show purposes. 

We are now contracting full wing Ringnecks in any quantity up to 5,000 for 
August and early fall delivery. 

If you want some splendid Chinese-Mongolian cocks for new blood in your pens, 
and are willing to pay $} each for them, send us a check. Hens $4.50. 
Expensive, but they're worth it. Member of the Game Guild 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY, 



MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



67 




Trapshooting Event 

FreeTiophies forlrapshootin^ Clubs 



Learn to shoot. Know how to handle and use a gun. 
Sharpen your judgment. Quicken your mental speed. 



TrapshootingJ 




S 



Smokeless 

Shotgun 

Powders 

leaders for over a century — 
are the choice of the Nation's 
crack trapshots. Look for 
the names on the Shell Box 
when you purchase shells. 

DU PONT > BALLISTITE 
SCHULTZE 



is the reconstructive Sport for modern men and women — and panic' 
ularly for the business man. It demands concentration — the kind of 
concentration that takes you completely away from business cares 
and worries. It sends you back clearer and keener in thought and 
judgment. 

Beginners' Day Shoots 

will be held at hundreds of gun clubs during June and July. Why 
not attend? Get a taste of the game's fascination. Don't let pride 
or timidity stop you. The gun club is the place to learn and the old 
timers will be glad to welcome and help you. 

Write today for full information and name of nearest gun club. 
SPORTING POWDER DIVISION 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. 



The Principal du Pont Products are: 



Explosives: Industrial, Agricultural and sporting. Chemicals: Pyroxylin Solutions. Ethers, Bronzing Liquids, 
Coal Tar Distillates, Commercial Acids, Alums, etc. Leather Substitutes: Fabrikoid Upholstery, Rayntite 
Top Material, Fairfield Rubber Cloth. Pyroxylin Plastics: Ivory, Shell and Transparent Py-ra-lin, Py-ra-lin 
Specialties, Challenge Cleanable Collars and CufFs. Paints and Varnishes: For Industrial and Home Uses. 
Pigments and Colors in Oil: For Industrial Uses. Lithopone : For Industrial Uses. Stains, Fillers, 
Lacquers and Enamels: For Industrial and Home Uses. Dyestuffs: Coal Tar Dyestuffs and Intermediates. 

For full information address : Advertising Division, E. I. du Pont de Nemours &- Co., Wilmington, Delaware. 



Visit the Trapshooting School, Young's Pier, Atlantic City, N. J- 



M 




13 

a 



LiiJ 



68 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Straight Shooting 

Americanism 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



No. 6 

American- Marksmen Series 

Painted for Remington UMC 

by F. X. Leyendecker 




I 'HE same dominating, well coordinated manhood which enables the 
■*• American whose recreation is pistol shooting to keep in front in the 

onward rush or world reconstruction, is latent in most Americans. 

Target shooting with the pistol will bring it out — and better all- round 

Americanism. 
Are you a pistol snooting hitching post, or are you too getting some good out or your pistol? 
Do you -want to know more about this very valuable, enjoyable and distinctly American sport? 
Ask your local dealer, the live Remington UMC merchant whose store is Sportsmen s Head- 
quarters in your community ■ — one or more than 82,700 in this country. 

Or write to our Service Department and your questions will be answered in detail by an all- 
around shooter and authority, backed by the Remington UMC nation-wide organization. 

Pistol and Revolver Club Secretaries — AVrite today tor blank registration card for Remington UMC free service. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the VC?or?d 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING NEW YORK 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XV 



JUNE, 1919 



NUMBER 3 



SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



The Aeroplane Sport. 

Mr. Charles W. Howell in a paper 
read at the annual meeting of the Aero- 
nautical Society of America said : "In 
the fields of sport and recreation, it is 
hard to conceive a more ideal and at the 
same time a more practical means of 
transportation. With it one may break- 
fast at home, have an hour of fatigue- 
less, exhilarating flight, and be an hun- 
dred miles away, with a full day for 
shooting, fishing or recreation. Then 
an hour of restful air travel and we may 
be home to dine and to sleep in ones' 
own bed. This is not possible with any 
other means, and further, as fish and 
game are rarely found in places reached 
by good roads or the usual transporta- 
tion routes, the value of the aeroplane 
for sporting purposes is very apparent. 
It will extend vacations by the time it 
saves." 

Game Breeders in Colorado. 

When forwarding an application for a 
breeders' license ( which is known as a 
Game Park License in Colorado, and 
which costs $25 for ten years) the game 
officer of Colorado wrote to one of our 
members, "one license can cover as much 
ground as you require provided it is all 
connected, but it is necessary for me to 
have the metes and bounds in order to 
properly fill out the license." 

In another letter written by W. B. 
Fraser the late State game officer of Col- 
orado shortly before he died, Mr. Fraser 
says he is much interested in the work 
of the Game Breeders' Association, 
which has undertaken the propagation 
of game birds in Colorado. 

He adds : "I am expecting at almost 
any day a report from three different 
sources regarding the cause of the mor- 



tality suffered by some quail, and upon 
receipt of the same I shall be pleased to 
supply you with a copy. The last six 
dozen of these birds that we secured 
through Mr. Hoppes' efforts died while 
we were watching and trying to discov- 
er the cause. If this department can be 
of any assistance to you I would appre- 
ciate your commands." 

Mr. Fraser was a capable State game 
officer, and in his death Colorado has 
suffered a great loss. 

Why Any Penalty? 

Mr. Perry writes. that by forming an 
association one license fee is sufficient 
for all of the members. This saved us 
six hundred and fifty dollars and made 
it possible for us farmers to engage in 
the game breeding business. Mr. Perry 
well says, "But why penalize the busi- 
ness at all? And the Game Breeder 
says, Amen. No charge is made in Mas- 
sachusetts. 

We hope to get the reports about the 
trouble with the State quail in Colorado, 
and this will remind our contributor to 
send the report along; when it comes 
from the State Department. 

The Sale of Game in Quebec. 

In the Province of Quebec, Canada, 
the sale of birch or spruuce partridge is 
prohibited until October 1, 1920. Game 
lawfully taken may be sold from the 
third day of the open season to and in- 
cluding the fifteenth day after the ex- 
piration of the open season. Licensed 
hotels, restaurants and clubs may serve 
game lawfully taken, except birch or 
spruce partridge. The sale of migratory 
birds is prohibited during the closed sea- 
son. 



70 



THE GAME BREEDER 



The three-day limit at the opening of 
the season evidently is intended to per- 
mit the taking of "game for the market 
before the opening date. The fifteen- 
day limit at the close of the season per- 
mits dealers to dispose of stock on hand 
and unsold at the closing date. 

The old common law idea that game 
legally taken is owned by the person tak- 
ing it, because of his industry, is ex- 
pressed in the law. If the person legal- 
ly taking game owns it he should, of 
course, have the right to give his proper- 
ty away or to sell it under proper regu- 
lations. The sale of game, undoubtedly, 
will hasten its extermination, provided 
there be no practical production of game, 
but it long has been evident that the 
shooting of game, even when its sale is 
prohibited, produces the same result, for 
the very good reason that game cannot 
stand the loss due to shooting (which is 
an extra or additional check to its in- 
crease) unless some practical game pre- 
serving be done and some of the natural 
checks to its increase be controlled in 
order to make a place for the shooting. 
Since the people are said to own the 
game, it seems fair that they should 
have some of it to eat when the game is 
legally taken, and the Quebec law is 
founded on this idea, no. doubt. If the 
game vanishes, as it will, if there be no 
production the remedy is either to put 
it on the song bird list, or to encourage 
production by private enterprise in order 
to keep up the food supply. There is 
plenty of room in Quebec for game 
farms and preserves and also for public 
shooting, which should be as good as it 
is on Long Island, New York, where 
game shooting clubs are numerous. Mr. 
Chambers, the special expert officer of 
the Department of Mines and Fisheries 
■ — Fisheries and Game Branch — thor- 
oughly understands the game and the 
causes for its increase and decrease in 
numbers. He is the secretary of the 
North American Association, which was 
among the first to indorse the "more 
game and fewer game laws" movement 
and to declare in favor of laws permit- 
ting the profitable production of game. 

We have said often that we will not 
oppose laws prohibiting the sale of game 



taken on public lands and waters ; that 
we will not oppose laws creating short 
open seasons and very small bags. We 
will not oppose closed seasons and the 
prohibition of shooting, provided these 
laws contain a clause exempting game 
breeders who may wish to have plenty of 
game and good shooting. 

A Punch for Branding Young Ducks. 

In answer to inquiry as to where the 
proper punch (to be used by game breed- 
ers to brand the feet of their young 
ducks) could be obtained, Dr. Nelson, 
chief of the Biological Survey writes : 
"We do not know where a punch ready 
for use can be obtained but do not be- 
lieve that any difficulty will be had in 
having a common punch changed at any 
locksmiths or other repair shop so it 
would clip out a good sized "V" from the 
web of the duckling's foot." 

We hope all good breeders will se- 
cure a proper punch and live strictly up 
to the regulation requiring the brand- 
ing of young ducks. The commercial 
game farmers will brand their ducks be- 
fore they are shipped and they will be 
ready for the shooting and later for the 
market provided more ducks be shot than 
can be used by the preserve owner or 
members of game shooting clubs. Many 
clubs which made a late start will rely 
largely on branded ducks purchased from 
our advertisers. 

Don't wait to be asked to advertise. 
We are entirely too busy to solicit ad- 
vertisements of game birds and eggs. 
Send space advertisements if you have 
many birds or eggs to sell. A few lines 
of classified advertising will be suffi- 
cient for small breeders. 

An advertisement sent by the year is 
the cheapest and the best. It is always 
before our readers and some say the 
advertisements are the most interesting 
part of the publication. 

Our advertisers do a great public serv- 
ice in letting the people know where to 
procure stock birds and eggs. 

Again "The Crow!" 

Do you know that Pennsylvania has 
abolished its crow law? For a time the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



71 



state offered a bounty of fifty cents for 
each crow killed. The state paid out 
about a hundred thousand dollars in 
bounties before it repealed the law. It 
was discovered that rats, mice and other 
pests had increased alarmingly ; and the 
generally approved estimate was that 
this bounty law had cost the farmers over 
two million dollars, as well as costing 
the state over a hundred thousand dol- 
lars. Illinois had a crow-bounty law at 
one time, and was glad to take it off 
the books. Enterprising gentlemen of 
other states were shipping in crows in 
car lots. They found that the crow had 
its place in the plans of Nature — Sat- 
urday Evening Post. 

Wanted a Permit. 

One of our western readers writes, "I 
did want a permit to trap ducks so much 
but now the birds soon will be setting. 
There is no other naturalist that I could 
get to indorse me as I am the only man 
in this neighborhood that I know of who 
breeds game and I would need two sign- 
ers to indorse me or recommend me." 
We think it might be a good plan to 
amend the regulations so that those who 
wish to produce thousand of wild fowl 
can secure permits to take live birds for 
breeding purposes. 

It_ seems peculiar not to require shoot- 
ers to get the indorsement of two well- 
known ornithologists, who have known 
them for years, before they can shoot 
twenty-five ducks per day and to require 
a game breeder to secure such indorse- 
ment before he can take twenty-five 
ducks alive in order to produce hun- 
dreds of ducks. 

The late Dr. Judd, one of the best as- 
sistants the Biological Survey ever had, 
said in a bulletin that the laws prohibit- 
ing the trapping of quail should always 
provide for the trapping of the birds 
for breeding purposes. 

Conflict About Permits. 

When the United States issues a per- 
mit to take wild fowl and eggs for breed- 
ing purposes it certainly will seem pe- 
culiar to the holder of such permit if a 
state game warden decides to arrest him 



for his attempt to produce food on his 
farm. We would not care to insure the 
continuance of a state officer in office 
should he arrest a game breeder and we 
hope any game breeder holding a na- 
tional permit who may be interfered with 
by a state official will promptly report 
the matter to the Game Breeder. We 
are able to pass news of this character 
directly to the farmers and to intelligent 
sportsmen. 

More Laws. 

The sportsman's league of Pennsylva- 
nia strongly favors twenty-two new 
game laws which have been introduced 
and which are outlined in its legislative 
bulletin. It demands amendments to 
or opposes other bills, eight in number, 
and it lists fourteen proposed laws which 
have not been passed on by the league. 
Quite a swell bunch of new laws for 
Pennsylvania ! 

We are surprised that so few new 
laws are needed to satisfy the Pennsyl- 
vania appetitie for legislation this year. 
Now that the ruffed grouse is on the 
scng bird list and the Pennsylvania foxes 
and other "varmints" have probably eat- 
en up any Mexican quail winch survived 
the cold spring weather one would think 
that the sport of getting more game laws 
in Pennsylvania might produce bigger re- 
sults. Possibly the fewer game law idea 
may have affected the league. 

In addition to the new laws proposed 
by individuals and leagues there is a big 
bill called the Conservation Department 
Bill, which the league wishes to have 
amended in many places. These meas- 
ures should keep the Pennsylvania leg' 
islators busy for a long session. 

Wild Ducks in Minnesota. 

One of our Minnesota readers writes : 
"It has always seemed to the writer that 
we are too far north and our winters are 
too cold to engage in this business 
(breeding wild ducks) successfully. It 
would be too expensive to winter over 
the breeding stock. What do you think 
about this?" 

We think there is no state in the 
union where wild duck breeding can be 



72 



THE GAME BREEDER 



made more profitable than it can be 
made in Minnesota. The best place to 
breed any kind of game is the place 
where it now breeds or where it former- 
ly did abundantly. 

It has been proved that wild ducks can 
be wintered safely and at no great ex- 
pense by providing simple winter quar- 
ters for the birds during two or three 
months in the winter. During the rest 
of the year if the ground included in the 
game farm or preserve contains natural 
foods the ducks will require very little 
artificial feeding, far less than poultry 
requires. 

A little corn .fed once a day or even 
every few days will hold the ducks and 
they can be fed both summer and win- 
ter on some less expensive foods part of 
the time. Turnips, potatoes, apples and 
other fruit which are not suitable for the 
market are suitable duck food, and in 
fact the ducks will eat almost any vege- 
tables and fruits and acorns and other 
waste of all kinds. 

The common mallards sell readily at 
$3 and $4 per pair and other species 
bring much better prices, some as much 
as $10 and $15 per pair. When the 
ducks are trapped and wing clipped 
they can be induced to lay their eggs 
in wire inclosures where easily they 
are gathered and the ducks persist 
in laying when the eggs are gathered 
daily, so that the breeder can count on 
marketing two or three dozen eggs from 
each duck. The eggs of the mallard sell 
readily in large lots at $20 and $25 per 
hundred. The eggs of teal, wood-duck, 
gadwalls and other shoal water ducks 
sell for at least one-third more. The 
eggs of red-heads and canvas backs sell 
for $8 and $10 per dozen. 

Wild ducks now are bred successfully 
and profitably on game farms in New 
England and as far north as Maine in 
places where the natural food for ducks 
is not nearly so good or so abundant 
as it is in Minnesota. 

Wild ducks and geese are successfully 
bred in the Dakotas and in Michigan, 
Wisconsin and other northern states. 

Flocks of wild ducks and geese reared 
under control but which are permitted to 
fly about at all seasons (excepting dur- 



ing the breeding season when some birds 
are clipped in order to make them nest 
where the eggs can be gathered easily 
and during two or three months in the 
winter when they may be housed part 
of the time) are a beautiful ornament 
to any farm or country estate and they 
are the easiest game birds to keep at 
home and to breed successfully. Under 
the game breeder laws in many states 
the ducks can be shot during long open 
seasons and they will provide a highly 
desirable food for the table and excel- 
lent shooting for those who enjoy field 
sports. We have enthusiastic letters 
from those who are engaged in the new 
industry and there can be no doubt about 
its being made profitable as well as en- 
tertaining in Minnesota. 

An advertisement in the Game Breed- 
er will surely sell all the birds and eggs 
which the owner may wish to sell. A 
country hotel owner or a farmer who 
will produce a good lot of ducks for 
sport surely will have all the customers 
he may wish to entertain at attractive 
prices. In the older countries many ru- 
ral hotels conduct game preserves for 
their patrons. In some places in Amer- 
ica game-shooting clubs make such ho- 
tels their headquarters and look after the 
game preserving, employing the game- 
keeper and breeding the game on lands 
purchased or rented for the purpose. 



It always has seemed strange to us 
that in a big country like America the 
people who are said to own the game 
cannot have any to eat, while in coun- 
tries which have common sense laws the 
market gunners bring in the game to 
the markets just as our fishermen bring 
in the fish. All broad guage, fair-minded 
men will agree that if any errors are 
made in the distribution they should be 
"in the direction of liberality," as Owen 
Jones said when giving advice about sup- 
plying rats with rat poison. 



The Game Breeder, an advertiser 
writes, evidently reaches them all. 

"More Game and Fewer Game Laws" 
has come to stay. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



73 



REFLECTIONS ON GAME BREEDING. 

By Aldo Leopold 

[We take pleasure in printing the following article, taking exception to what the writer 
seems to think is our attitude towards restrictive game laws. The magazine is open at all 
times to those who wish to express their opinion. The best possible way to arrive at any just 
conclusion is to hear both sides. We are not opposed to laws prohibiting the sale of game and 
provding for short seasons and small bags. We believe the bags must be made smaller and 
the seasons shorter as the game continues to vanish and that the closed seasons for terms of 
years or forever are exactly right where no one looks after the game. We believe the farmers 
cannot be induced to look after the game simply by the promise that the state will furnish 
licensed trespassers to shoot up the farms. All that we ask is that profitable game production 
be permitted and not prevented by the game laws which have not kept quail and grouse shoot- 
ing open on the farms. We believe that sportsmen of small means can have good and inexpensive 
shooting on many of the posted farms if they be permitted to sell some of the game they pro- 
duce. We have no objection to licensing the dealers and requiring them to sell only the game 
from game farms and preserves, but in countries which permit free shooting it is a fact that 
market gunners also can sell the game they shoot. We are opposed to applying the prohibitive 
laws to game breeders. We have said repeatedly we will not oppose a thousand more laws if 
they be not applied to producers. The addition of Section 12 to the migratory bird law pro- 
tecting game breeders put an end to our opposition to that law. Our ideas are well expressed 
in said Section 12. — Editor.] 



I have followed with much interest 
the policy of your magazine, and in par- 
ticular the editorial utterances of your 
April issue. Your program of nation- 
wide game farming embraces many con- 
structive and really helpful proposals, 
which you are hammering into the mind 
of the public with the most commenda- 
ble energy. This very fact, however, in- 
tensifies my regret over what appears to 
me as an unfair attitude toward certain 
highly important questions. 

Take, for instance, the question of 
markets. You will hardly deny that it 
was the open market which, more than 
any other one thing, originally destroyed 
our natural supply of wild game. By 
dint of twenty years of hard fighting, 
our sportsmen have at last succeeded in 
closing this market. Comes now the 
Game Breeder, and wants the market 
reopened ! 

[There are two kinds of markets. We favor 
the market which induces production and keeps 
game abundant — not the market which causes 
extermination. We hope you will see the 
difference and how you misunderstand our 
attitude. — Editor.] 

Of course nobody will deny the right 
of the game farmer to market the prod- 
uct of his licensed game pens, duly 
marked in accordance with the law. But 
there is more than a veiled hint that 
the Game Breeder considers this mark- 



ing, this distinction between wild and 
private game, as more or less of a nui- 
sance, and that eventually the markets 
should be thrown wide open to all game 
alike.* 

• 

Now what would become of our real 
game with the ranks of sportsmen divid- 
ed over the market question ? The gour- 
mand-hotel-pothunter combination is 
hard enough to beat with a solid front — ■ 
do the game farmers now propose to 
split that solid front and reinforce the 
common enemy? If so, what would be- 
come of our wild game? It would evap- 
orate. Such an outcome would profit the 
game farmers, but disgrace the country. 
What are the game farmers going to 
do about it? 

It may well be that I misinterpret your 
proposals, and misjudge their probable 
future results. If so, I think there are 
many sportsmen like myself who would 
appreciate enlightenment through the col- 
umns of your magazine.! 



*We have no objection to licensing dealers 
and to requiring the identification of the game 
sold. The best game breeding is done in fields 
not in pens. When game is bred in fields 
much of it escapes and is shot beyond their 
fences. Penned game often suffers from dis- 
eases. 

t Game breeders can get better prices for 



74 



THE GAME BREEDER 



their game provided the sale of game taken on 
public lands and waters be prohibited. We do 
not think they object to such prohibition. We 
have said that in countries where there is more 
freedom than there is in America the market 
gunners own the game they shoot and we think 
it important that people who imagine only 
Dukes and Lords shoot in the free countries 
6hould know that not only small farmers and 
town clerks and business men who produce 
game but also non-producers, the market gun- 
ners, shoot and sell it. 

Secondly, allow me to take exception 
to the emphasis which you place on game 
as a food supply. I "feel it in my bones" 
that to make food production one of the 
major objects of game conservation will 
eventually lead to trouble. Game con- 
servation has one object and only one — 
to perpetuate wild life as an indispensa- 
ble source of human recreation. Game 
conservation is not a matter of the flesh- 
pots. It concerns not so much the belly, 
as it does the eye, the mind, and the 
soul. To bring home a mess of game 
for the family — this indeed is necessary 
to satisfy that high human instinct, the 
exercise of which we call sportsmanship. 
In so far forth, game conservation is a 
matter of food. But to produce game 
to sell as food is a human benefit of 
such insignificance, as compared with 
producing game for recreation, that the 
two can hardly be mentioned together, 
much less listed together as the two main 
objectives of game conservation. 

This may sound like pretty fine-spun 
theorizing, but I think it highly import- 
ant that the cause of game conservation 
should rest on its real merits, not on its 
incidental benefits. I am reminded of 
those preachers, happily few, who tell us 
we should go to church because church- 
going benefits our business standing. By 
thus emphasizing the incidental they de- 
base their high calling, and inspire not 
confidence, but disgust.* 



*The most devout preacher will 'tell you that 
money is needed to keep the church going. 
Laws preventing the profitable production of 
sermons would be disastrous. I once said, 
when speaking at a sportsman's dinner, that 
if our game laws were applied to religion they 
would close the churches. A minister who 
was present asked what I meant by the state- 
ment. When I explained that money was 
necessary he agreed with me. 



Thirdly, are you not a bit unfair about 
closed seasons and restrictive game laws? 
"Laws have not restored the game- 
therefore abolish laws and try game 
farming; cure guaranteed." This, I 
think, is but a very slight exaggeration 
of your general attitude. For my part, 
I fully share your impatience with the 
paper game protector- — the man who 
thinks that laws alone, enforced -or un- 
enforced, will save the game. Of course 
laws alone will not raise game any more 
than a "no trespass" sign will raise a 
crop of melons, but is that any reason 
for tearing down the sign, burning down 
the fence, and chloroforming the bull- 
dog?* Hardly. But for restrictive laws, 
game farmers might today hunt a long 
while for even a seed-stock of many of 
our best game species. And how about 
law enforcement? What could we ex- 
pect of laws that due to the slothfulness 

*You are entirely mistaken about our atti- 
tude. We agree, no doubt, that laws do not 
produce and cannot permit upland shooting in 
populous regions. Where they do permit a little 
shooting the game vanishes from the farms 
for scientific reasons well known. We have 
never suggested tearing down the sign, burning 
the fence or chloroforming the bull dog on 
farms where a game crop is produced. We 
think there would be about as many quail as 
there would be melons in places where the bull 
dog is absolutely necessary for proper con- 
servation. Your cattle barons have larger 
ranches than most dukes. We strongly favor 
the encouragement of the average sportsman 
who can have cheap shooting. As to your idea 
that game only should be conserved for those 
who wish to shoot it for fun, we think the 
average citizen is inclined to say that food 
production, which will reduce the cost of meat 
for all of the people, is fully as important as 
class recreation is. The tendency is to de- 
nounce field sports ; to say shoot only clay 
pigeons and take all your exercise in the golf 
course or tennis field. The field sport pro- 
hibitionist is a big money maker and when the 
people have cheap game to eat this class of 
mischief-maker will be more easily circum- 
vented. You may be interested to know that 
I have seen many shore birds breeding abund- 
antly in a club ground where they had the 
protection from vermin. Snipe, tattlers and 
plover fed within a few feet of where I was 
seated one day making some sketches of the 
marsh. This place and many others would be 
uninhabitable for game were it not for the fact 
that it has the same protection some melon 
patches have. There are no Dukes but plenty 
of Ducks. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



75 



of; .our citizenship have existed mostly 
on paper? Moreover, how about our 
hundreds of migratory game species, 
such as the general family of shorebirds, 
which can probably never be "farmed," 
and which must be saved by laws or nut 
at all? 

Let us have fewer game laws and more 
game, by all means. But we will get 
neither unless those "fewer" laws are 
well advised, well enforced, well respect- 
ed — and not undermined by veiled con- 
tempt for the efficacy of game laws in 
general. If the Game Breeder wants the 



autocratic European system of 1,000 
grouse per day for earls and dukes, with 
the privilege of looking over the fence 
reserved for the common citizen, then 
your magazine is- headed in the right di- 
rection. But if we want to temper the 
undoubted "efficiency" of the European 
plan to the spirit of our American in- 
stitutions, then I would beg your greater 
tolerance toward closed markets and re- 
strictive game laws. These measures 
need to be simplified, perfected, enforced 
and supplemented by game farming — 
but not abolished. 



SOME BLACK DUCKS HATCHED IN AN INCUBATOR. 

By Z. Ted DeKalmar 



I told you in one of my letters about 
a clutch of black duck eggs that I found 
in my swamp, laid by one of the visiting 
blacks and which I felt obliged to steal, 
as the duck did not return after sev- 
eral hours' absence. The story about the 
eggs follows : I found the eggs on Mon- 
day, April 7th, at about one o'clock, P.M. 
Under the circumstances I presumed the 
eggs had not been set upon since I dared 
not to hope that any of the visiting blacks 
would nest on the place in view of the 
fact that I had been busy for weeks past 
enlarging the enclosure. One Tuesday, 
April 8, at 7.45 A. M., some eighteen 
hours later, these eggs were put into an 
incubator having in the meantime been 
kept in a cool room but without any 
special precaution. 

I thought it best to follow the usual 
procedure of starting the incubator at 
101 degrees, treating the eggs as if they 
had not been set upon. In two weeks' 
time I raised it to 102 degrees, still pre- 
suming that the eggs set on April 8 
would only be due May 5. To my utter 
amazement I found the eggs pipping on 
April 28 and on the following morning 
1 found eight ducklings out ; one was 
dead in the shell and two eggs were ad- 
dled of the original eleven eggs. This 
would indicate that these eggs had been 
incubated not less than eight days. What 



I wish to emphasize, however, is the fact 
that any eggs hatched after having been 
"cooled" for 18 hours in a room the 
temperature of which was about 55 de- 
grees. It speaks volumes for the staying 
power of wild-bred stock and their off- 
spring and I was gratified to have ex- 
perienced the singular occurrence. 

This, however, is not all. It so hap- 
pened that when 36 hours old I smug- 
gled the ducklings under a hen with a 
brood of five day old chicks and housed 
in the barn on account of inclement 
weather. The exchange was made late 
at night and the hen was quite ignorant 
of its nature. Having made sure she 
would accept the ducklings, I retired. 

During the night there was a heavy 
rainstorm, and at six o'clock A. M. when 
I went down to look after the ducklings 
my setting hens, chicks and everything 
were dripping wet. Opening the barn 
door I found one of the little ducks out- 
side of the hatching room, standing in 
the middle of the bare floor. I went to 
the nest to find the hen sitting on 
two ducklings crushed to death and 
the rest were massing. Printers' ink, pa- 
per and time are too precious nowadays 
for me to recite my utterances. I made 
a complete search of the barn and im- 
mediate neighborhood but I found noth- 
ing. I "spoke" duck, then duckling, but 



76 



THE GAME BREEDER 



no answer came and I gave it up. Two 
and one-half hours later when on my 
way down to the swamp, following a 
path and much down-hearted, I came 
upon five of the missing ducklings not 
less than 400 feet from the barn and 
apparently on their way to the swamp. 
They, no doubt, had heard the mallards 
calling there. With heads erect, look- 



ing like a bunch of drowned rats, ragged 
and wet to the skin, there they stood 
bunched and piping at the top of their 
voices. I rushed them up to the house 
and put them into the incubator. The 
six survivors are now six days old. None 
perished as a result of the exposure and 
I have a wholesome respect for the har- 
diness of wild-bred stock. ■ 



RABBIT GROWING TO SUPPLEMENT THE MEAT SUPPLY 

From a Bulletin by Ned Dearborn, 
Assistant Biologist, Bureau of Biological Survey. 



Consuming annually more than his 
own weight of meat, the average Ameri- 
can regards it as an essential part of his 
diet. But with its cost, mounting higher 
and higher, many people can no longer 
afford to buy the better cuts. Former 
low prices of meats can not be expected 
to return, for, in keeping with the prin- 
ciples of diversified farming, much of 
the vast unfenced range of the West 
has been divided into farms producing 
less meat but more cereals and dairy 
products. Not only is our output of 
meat proportionally less than formerly, 
but its cost per pound has increased with 
increasing land values and expenditures 
for buildings, fences, labor and taxes. 
To meet the requirements of a growing 
population, more grain has been pro- 
duced, but meat production has not kept 
pace with it. High prices attract to our 
shores meat from foreign countries, and, 
strange as it may seem, the United 
States, which ranks first among the 
meat-producing countries of the world, 
ranks fourth among those importing 
meat. 

In attempting to solve the meat prob- 
lem, we may well profit by the experi- 
ence of thickly populated countries of 
the Old World, where long ago it be- 
came necessary to learn to produce meat 
by raising animals which would thrive 
under restricted conditions. The fact 
that raising what we ordinarily consider 
meat animals — cattle, sheep, goats, hogs, 
and poultry — costs more than formerly 
makes it very evident that the meat sup- 



ply must be supplemented from other 
sources. 

The course of events during the stress 
of the world war in congested countries 
of Europe and also in the United States 
indicates how waning supplies of meat 
may be most conveniently and economi- 
cally supplemented. When beef fails, 
horseflesh- frequently becomes its substi- 
tute. While wholesome enough, horse- 
flesh does not appeal to the American 
appetite, and its general adoption as food 
is not anticipated so long as other kinds 
of meat are available or can be devel- 
oped. A far more promising meat ani- 
mal is the rabbit, which, both wild and 
domesticated, has long been used exten- 
sively as food in Europe, and to a com- 
paratively small degree in this country. 

There are four animals which may be 
kept by thrifty people to convert farm 
and garden refuse intp meat — the chick- 
en, the goat, the pig, and the rabbit. Any 
one of the first three is likely to become 
a nuisance in a thickly settled community 
unless great care is taken, but scores of 
silent, wholesome rabbits may easily be 
kept on a city lot without giving the 
slightest offense. 

Consumption of Rabbit Meat in 
Europe. 

Before the outbreak of the war in 
1914, rabbits ware kept on the farms and 
in the towns of northern France and 
Belgium for home use and for market 
as commonly as poultry. In the greater 



THE GAME BREEDER 



77 



part of Europe, excepting the more 
northerly portions, rabbit breeding was 
an important industry. About 100,000,- 
000 rabbits were marketed annually in 
France. Approximately 2,200,000 rab- 
bits were raised in Belgium in 1898 for 
home consumption and for export. The 
value of rabbits annually exported from 
Ostend to England, exceeded $1,000,000, 
while, including wild hares raised in her 
game preserves, England herself was 
producing from 30,000,000 to 40,000,000 
rabbits. In 1911, the consumption of 
rabbits in London amounted to 500,000 
pounds daily, and in Paris to 200,000 
pounds. The use of rabbits for food is 
not a novelty in England, for, as far back 
as 1874, 350,000 rabbits were sold annu- 
ally in Birmingham, 300,000 in Manches- 
ter, 200,000 in Nottingham, and 150,000 
each in Sheffield, Newcastle, and Leeds. 
The value of rabbit meat imported into 
Great Britain through London from 
Australia and New Zealand was $4,500,- 
000 in 1910. In Germany, rabbits have 
been raised mainly for consumption in 
the homes of the breeders. Bavaria pro- 
duced 415,000 rabbits in 1911. This aid 
to the solution of the meat problem in 
Europe is practicable in America. 

Rabbit Growing in America. 

For many years rabbits have been 
raised in this country as pets and as 
fancy stock for competitive exhibitions. 
Until recently, however, there has been 
no real incentive to breed them for prac- 
tical ends, as they were not actually need- 
ed for food, and better fur than theirs 
could be had for little money. So long 
as they were looked upon merely as pets 
they were rarely utilized for food. 

Wild rabbits are common everywhere. 
They are hunted and trapped by farmers, 
sportsmen and others and are consumed 
at home or sold as game. Between No- 
vember and March they are shipped in 
carload lots from the Great Plains 10 
Boston, New York and other easte T n 
cities. Virginia and the states in the 
Mississippi valley furnish a great many 
wild rabbits for local markets. At a 
tme when round steak was selling at 
\2 J / 2 cents a pound and cottontail rab- 
bits at 25 cents a pair or even at 25 cents 



each, no one was interested in raising 
rabbits for the table. 

During the years 1899 and 1900, while 
the cost of food was still low, there oc- 
curred what has been known as the Bel- 
gian hare boom, which, while it lasted, 
attracted much attention. Importers 
went to England for pedigreed breeding 
stock, pedigrees being at that time ra- 
ther more highly thought of than the 
rabbits themselves, and shipped back 
dozens of Belgian hares every week. 
Wealthy fanciers went to great lengths 
for prize- winning stock. Fifty dollars 
was not an unusual price for one of 
these rabbits at breeding age, and $265 is 
said to have been paid for one • rabb-t 
imported for exhibition at a show in 
Chicago in 1899. The boom spread rap- 
idly and continued as long as there was a 
demand for such breeding stock, but 
when the demand came down to a meit 
basis the boom collapsed, as there was; 
then no real need for a new source of 
meat. 

Lately, people here and there have- 
very quietly taken up rabbit raising, first 
for home use, then for sale. This move- 
ment, undertaken to supply an actual' 
need for meat, is fulfilling expectations.. 
City and suburban dwellers are raising 
rabbits in back yards. Although the to- 
tal production is yet comparatively small, 
it is steadily increasing. In certain lo- 
calities in California, Oregon, Washing- 
ton, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Michi- 
gan and several other States, the do- 
mesticated rabbit is recognized as a reg- 
ular meat animal. Rabbits are either 
shipped alive to market in crates or are 
neatly dressed ready for cooking and 
packed in a sanitary manner for trans-' 
portation. 

The saving and earning power of rab- 
bits is illustrated by the following con-? 
crete examples of what is actually being 
done with them : One resident of Kan- 
sas City, Kans., raises 300 or 400 pounds 
of rabbit meat a year for his own table 
at a cost of only 8 or 10 cents a pound, 
Another resident of the same city, who 
breeds registered stock on a space meas- 
uring 20 by 24 feet in his back yard, 
has raised and sold enough rabbits in 18 
months to clear $2,400. A large religious 



78 



THE GAME BREEDER 



institution in Nebraska raises rabbits in- 
stead of poultry and reports the meat 
more satisfactory than chicken, and the 
experiment profitable. According to a 
former county commissioner of the State 
of Washington, rabbits were grown on 
the county farm to provide for the coun- 
ty hospitals a substitute for chicken ; the 
initial stock numbered 119 rabbits, which 
•increased to 1,200 in 10 months, besides 
those used in the hospitals. These are 
not isolated cases, they are simply ex- 
amples of what is being done in rabbit 
raising, and are an indication of what 
this industry is likely to become when 
its profitableness is more generally rec- 
ognized. 

UTILITY BREEDS OF RABBITS. 

Of about 20 varieties of rabbits com- 
peting at American shows under estab- 
lished standards of size, form and color, 
there are seven which, because of size, 
are classed as utility rabbits. These sev- 
en are comprised in three types, repre- 
sented by the so-called "Giants," the Bel- 
gian hares, and the New Zealand red 
rabbits. 

THE GIANTS. 

One group includes the different va- 
rieties of giants, which, according to 
their color, are named gray, steel gray, 
checkered and solid colored, as black, 
white or blue. All are long-bodied and 
massive, weighing when adult from 11 
to 20 pounds each. Across the throat 
of the doe is a thick fold of skin called 
the dewlap, which is conspicuous when 
the chin is drawn inward. The grays 
run especially heavy, the standards call- 
ing for a weight of at least 13 pounds. 
The standard for checkered giants re- 
quires a weight of 11 to 13 pounds. Gi- 
ants are mature when about 15 months 
old. Those raised for meat purposes are 
usually sold before attaining full size, 
as the flesh of young rabbits is preferred 
to that of old ones. Checkered giams 
were developed in Germany. The other 
varieties, ordinarily grouped under the 
name Flemish giant, originated in that 
part of Belgium and northern France 
known as Flanders. Flemish giants are 
now bred in all parts of the country. 
They grow rapidly, withstand cold well, 



and where the market demands a he ivy 
type of rabbit, they are highly recom- 
mended. 

BELGIAN HARES. 

The Belgian hare, one of the second 
group, has descended from giant stock 
brought to England from Belgium, 
France and Germany. In the hands of 
British fanciers its size has been re- 
duced, its limbs lengthened, and its gen- 
eral ■ appearance changed by selective 
breeding to such a degree that it now 
looks and acts like the wild European 
hare. In recognition of this resemblance 
it was formerly called the Belgian hare 
rabbit, a name since contracted to Bel- 
gian hare.* It is a slender, muscular 
and graceful animal. According to the 
present standard, its proper weight is 
about 8 pounds. Typical does do not 
have the dewlap. The color of Belgian 
hares ranges in different specimens from 
a bright orange-brown or tan to mahog- 
any, varied by a mingling of black hairs, 
which gives the effect known as ticking. 
The Belgian hare was the first utility 
rabbit to make its appearance in America, 
and although it was introduced when 
conditions were unfavorable for its 
adoption as a meat animal, it has re- 
mained a favorite with fanciers, and at 
last seems destined to fulfil the purpose 
for which it was unsuccessfully advo- 
cated a score of years ago. The "rufous 
red" Belgian is one conforming to the 
American standard as to color, which is 
a dark cherry-red or mahogany, uniform 
over head, ears, chest, feet, back and 
sides, varied by scattered black hairs. ■ 

NEW ZEALAND REDS. 

A third type of utility rabbit is the 
New Zealand red, an animal intermedi- 
ate in size and form between the Flem- 
ish giant and the Belgian hare. It may 
have been produced by crossing the white 
Flemish giant with the rufous-red Bel- 
gian hare. This is suggested by its size 

*One difference between rabbits and hares 
is the condition of the young at birth. Rabbits, 
including the cottontails of America and the 
rabbits of the Old World, are born blind and 
naked. Hares, on the other hand, including the 
so-called snowshoe rabbits and jack rabbits of 
this country and the wild hares of Europe, are 
covered with fur and have eyes open at birth. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



79 



and color, and by the fact that the earlier 
specimens had considerable white on the 
legs. It may, however, have descended,, 
as has been claimed, from rabbits ob- 
tained by sailors in New Zealand and 
sold to California fanciers. Its origin 
is of less interest than its development, 
which has been accomplished in Cali- 
fornia since 1909, when it first gamed 
recognition. Although the name New 
Zealand red may have no geographical 
significance, it fairly describes the stand- 
ard color of this animal, the back and 
sides of which are of a clear reddish 
buff, free from black hairs. At matur- 
ity, which is attained at the age of one 
year, New Zealand bucks should weigh 
9 pounds, and does 10 pounds. The 
doe has a dewlap similar to that of the 
giants. This rabbit is compactly built, 
with thick hind quarters. It is best 
known near the Pacific coast, where it 
first appeared, but it is being bred \.o 
some extent in practically all the states. 

OUTLOOK FOR RABBIT BREEDING. 

Evidently something should be done to 
lower the high cost of meat. Meat pro- 
duced at home saves freight and several 
profits. The example of Europeans and 
the experience of breeders in America 
indicate that the utility rabbit will be a 
large factor in solving the meat problem. 
The question of food has been brought 
very close to us. The doctrine of the 
clean plate has been revived. Many 
have turned their yards into vegetable 
gardens and have been delighted with the 
results. Many have started rabbLries 
and are enthusiastic about them. In 
every garden there is feed for rabbits, 
feed that will be wasted unless there 
are rabbits to eat it. Dandelions are a 
pest in lawns, but they are excellent rab- 
bit feed when used with alfalfa or clover 
and oats or other grain, as also are 
leaves of the burdock, yellow dock and 
other weeds, and primings from apple 
and cherry trees. 

The first object in rabbit raising is 
to supply home needs. The best indorse- 
ment an article can have is the fact that 
it is used freely by its producer. If one 
is inclined to disdain domesticated rab- 
bits on account of experience with wild 
rabbits, he should consider that the lat- 



ter, as sold in butcher shops, are not to 
be compared as a delicacy with tender 
young hutch rabbits. 

Rabbit skins are being used in increas- 
ing quantities for fur, as the supply of 
wild fur decreases and as improvements 
in tanning and dyeing contribute to make 
the pelts more attractive. Some of the 
varieties of utility rabbits have pleasing 
colors naturally. For example, the 
checkered giant, which is mainly white, 
with conspicuous spots or patches of col- 
or on head, back and sides, has been ex- 
ploited as a fur rabbit on account of its 
striking color contrasts. Pelts of solid- 
colored rabbits, however, when prime, 
sell readily for fur purposes and are used 
extensively in natural colors and also, 
after being dyed, in making muffs, capes, 
stoles and trimmings for garments. Rab- 
bit fur is used also in making felt hats. 
Many thousands of pounds of rabbit 
skins are bought by manufacturers of 
hatters' fur in this country every year. 
After the fur is removed the skins are 
utilized in making glue. 

Boys' and girls' clubs, organized by the 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture and state agricultural colleges, have 
been a most important factor in dem- 
onstrating the good points of rabbits. 
Boys, girls and older persons having leis- 
ure can do much to increase the produc- 
tion of meat and fur by applying their 
spare time and energy to raising rabbits. 
Whenever rabbit raising has been un- 
dertaken in a community a demand for 
breeding stock and meat sufficient to ab- 
sorb the surplus has quickly arisen. 

A survey of existing conditions, in- 
cluding the food situation and the eco- 
nomical tendencies of the times, as well 
as the development of the rabbit in- 
dustry at home and abroad, justifies the 
assertion that the outlook for rabbit 
breeding in America is good. In recog- 
nition of this prospect, the Department 
of Agriculture is prepared to furnish 
advice on the breeding and marketing of 
rabbits, to assist in forming clubs, and 
to gather and distribute information as 
to breeding stock, current values of rab- 
bit meat and fur, and other matters 
affecting the rabbit industry. 

[The remarks about the food situation are 
applicable to all species of game. — Editor.] 



80 



THE GAME BREEDER 



MORE GAME AND FEWER CATS 



[The following was sent by the Commissioners on Fisheries and Game of Massachusetts. 
The Massachusetts Commission is quite up-to-date. It encourages the breeding of all species' of 
game under permits which cost nothing. — Editor.] 



The nesting season for the wild birds 
has arrived, and the commissioners on 
fisheries and game once more call at- 
tention to the necessity of keeping the 
family cat in control during the lime 
the eggs are being hatched and the 
fledgings are helpless, either in the nest 
or when first on the ground. 

It is a matter of common knowledge 
that on the activities of the insect-eating 
birds depends, in a large measure, the 
success of the crops and the preserva- 
tion of the forests. 

It is not so well known how enormous 
are the inroads on the wild birds by the 
family cat and the abandoned, hunting 
house cat. Often the owners honestly 
believe their cats to be innocent of the 
practice of killing birds, because the 
work is not done where they can see it. 

Careful studies on this subject have 
been made, and the results are surpris- 
ing. One cat, which was watched care- 
fully, was seen to kill 58 birds in a 
single season. 

Assuming that the average cat on the 
farm kills but ten birds a year, and that 
there are two cats on each farm in 
Massachusetts, we have, in round num- 



bers, 70,000 cats killing 700,000 birds 
annually. And this does, not take into 
account the cat population of cities, 
towns and villages. Song and insec- 
tivorous birds are sociable. They breed 
to a large extent in thickly settled com- 
munities. It is here that cats get in 
their deadliest work. 

These figures tell their own story. 

The commissioners appeal to every 
person who owns a cat to make it a per- 
sonal matter to see that the family pet 
is not permitted to roam at large in the 
day or night during this crucial period 
when the success of the hatch of birds 
depends on the freedom they have from 
molestation. 

The season extends from May 15 to 
August 15. 

Over the weather conditions, which 
may reduce the number of the hatch, we 
have no control ; but this other danger 
can be minimized if every one will make 
an effort to do his or her part. The 
birds can be depended on to do theirs. 

Every bird lover is asked to see that 
homeless and wild hunting house cats are 
humanely killed. 



HOW TO MAKE A DUCK POND. 

By C. B. McGee 



Any one interested in making a pond 
for wild ducks should know that the use 
of dynamite is the best and cheapest 
way to remove the dirt for making the 
hole to fill with water. 

I think it best to make the pond where 
there is running water, as pure water is 
much better than a* pool of stagnant or 
filthy water. 

Dynamite will remove stone or stumps 
or any obstructions, and you can make 
the pond any place that is suitable. 



I would place a charge of about three 
sticks of Du Pont Red Cross Extra 40 
per cent, dynamite in the center of the 
place I wished to make the pond. The 
force of the explosive will remove the 
dirt to start the pond. 

There was some stone in the dirt in 
the place shown in the photograph 1 
send you, but the explosive did a nice 
job. 

After placing your center shot, place 
about six charges of about two sticks. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



81 



each evenly distributed around the cen- 
ter shot. 

This will make a small pond about 
twelve feet in diameter at a cost of about 
$4.00 for the dynamite, fuse and caps. 

The amount of explosive to use for 
each charge will vary some in the differ- 
ent kinds of soil. 

The use of dynamite would be the 
cheapest way to make a duck pond of 
any size and in any kind of material. 



[We think the best pond for ducks can be 
made by dynamiting a circular or oblong ditch, 
leaving an island in the center. At the Wad- 
ing River preserve of The Game Breeders 
Association a pond of this character was dug 
by hand labor in a wet field where there was 
no water. Here over twenty-five hundred 
ducks were raised in one season from eggs laid 
in a wire inclosure which surrounded the pond. 
The pond could have been made much quicker 
and cheaper by the use of dynamite. Mr. 
McGee says he will be glad to answer any 
questions about the use of dynamite made by 
those who would like to make ponds for ducks. 
He is quite right in saying it is desirable to 
have running water. A little brook can be 
made to flow through the pond; but, although 
this was impossible at the Wading River pre- 
serve since there was no flowing water, the 
pond was used several seasons and many ducks 
were reared successfully and later transferred 
to other ponds where the shooting was con- 
ducted.— Editor.] 



Home from the War. 

The Game Breeder : 

Will you kindly send me a statement 
of my standing with you, and tell me 
when my subscription ran out or when 
it will run out. 

I have returned from overseas and 
find that your fine magazine has been 
coming regularly in my absence, but I 
am under the impression that my sub- 
scription has expired and I want to make 
it right if that is the case, and to thank 
you for your kindness in continuing it. 

You may be interested to know that as 
I was in the air service (first lieutenant 
flying) I had considerable spare time 
(waiting for the liberty motor and plane 
to arrive) and took every opportunity 
to observe the game and conditions in 



France and to talk to the people inter- 
ested, both there and in England, though 
I was in England but a short time. 

I was also a prisoner in Germany for a 
short while but did not have much op- 
portunity to learn anything there — ex- 
cept to gain an everlasting hatred against 
the Boche — I am now held up here in 
Boston with a sickness which is the re- 
sult of having the influenza in Germany. 
I have been treated daily for months by 
a specialist and am not cured yet, but I 
hope to get back in the game if it is not 
too late in the season when I am finally 
cured. 

Arthur L. Clark. 



[We would like to publish the result of 
your inquiries about the game. — Editor.] 



A BIG GAME RANCH 

Mr. Dusette, of the Dusette. Game 
Ranch, Bad Axe, Michigan, writes : Af- 
ter August 1 and up to September 16 
we can fill large orders received early 
at less money than it costs most pre- 
serves to produce their birds. We shall 
make a specialty of supplying shooting 
clubs pure wild ducks and geese, with 
full wing and branded with the required 
V, so they can shoot and sell their 
birds. The ducks will be strong on the 
wing and have the natural wild flavor, 
since the ranch contains hundreds of 
acres with ponds and lakes full of wild 
duck food. The Dusette ducks already 
are favorably known to readers of The 
Game Breeder. The only trouble was 
there was not enough of them. 

We strongly advise readers to place 
their orders early, otherwise they prob- 
ably will not get birds this season. 



A Missing Steak. 

Waiter (hinting for a tip) — "And 
how did you find your steak, sir," 

Diner — "Oh, I just moved that little 
piece of potato and there it was." 

— Du Pont Magazine. 



82 



THE GAME BREEDER 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Prize Quail. 

Mr. D. Kalmar, one of our prize win- 
ners, writes, "Many thanks for the blue 
quail. They arrived in excellent con- 
dition and I am hoping to see them lay 
this season. I shall report the progress 
made." 

More Prize Quail. 

General Wingate writes that the 
scaled quail we sent to the Wyandanch 
Club arrived all right. They have been 
placed in separate coops and seem to be 
doing very well and will be turned out 
shortly. All are very much interested 
in what will be the result. 



Twice last summer we were called up 
from the dinner table by the cry of dis- 
tress from little pheasants and each time 
killed an eighteen-inch garter snake that 
was attempting to swallow them; both 
birds died in a few days. I wonder how 
many little quail fall a prey to the garter 
and other snakes. 

We had one ring-necked hen that in- 
cubated her own eggs in the aviary last 
season and brought off a brood of young 
pheasants. 

Both the silver and Reeves pheasants 
are more expert on the perch than our 
ring-necks are. The last named fre- 
quently fall to the ground when perch- 
ing on the trees at night. 



Periods of Incubation. 

Wild duck eggs (the mallards) may 
be said, roughly, to hatch in about twen- 
ty-six days. Capt. W. Coape Oates, a 
capable duck breeder and author, says : 
"Duck eggs take from twenty-four to 
twenty-nine days to hatch as a rule, 
though occasionally a lot of eggs that 
have been put down soon after being 
laid will hatch in twenty-three days, if 
set under a good hen. He regards twen- 
ty-six days as "the usual period of in- 
cubation." 

The period of incubation of pheasant 
eggs, as stated by Maxwell, is twenty- 
three or twenty-four days. 

The period of incubation of quail is 
about 24 days. The cock bird often will 
hatch the eggs if the hen dies after lay- 
ing the eggs. 

Turkey Hen as a Foster-Mother. 

J as. M. Perry 

You may tell your readers that the tur- 
key hen makes a good foster mother for 
ringnecked pheasants. With her it is 
not necessary to coop them up till they 
learn the "cluck" as it is with the chick- 
en hen. It is best not to have any young 
turkeys in the flock as they monopolize 
the mother turkey and oppress or tyran- 
ize over the little pheasants. 



More Quail Wanted. 

Mr. H. H. Shannon, 

Long Island Game Breeders Assn. 

Dear Sir: 

Mr. C. Von Lengerke advises us that 
you are raising quail for sale. 

We have been raising a sum of money 
locally and can possibly get three or four 
hundred dollars with which to buy some 
birds. Kindly advise us if you can do 
anything for us. Let us know just what 
you can do as to quantity, price and time 
of delivery. 

If you are not in a position to do 
anything, can you inform us of someone 
who is? 

Yours very truly, 

Newburgh Gun & Rifle Club Inc., 

R. W. Whitehill, Secretary. 

The Long Island Game Breeders As- 
sociation will breed quail of various spe- 
cies to be harvested not otherwise than 
by shooting. When the laws are amend- 
ed so as to encourage the profitable 
breeding of quail these birds will be more 
abundant in New York and more prof- 
itable than pheasants are because sports- 
men prefer them to all other feathered 
game and they are excellent food. Ad- 
vertisers in the Game Breeder supply 
quail; mostly Mexican. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



83 



More About the Massena Quail. 

iMr. W. H. Pigg, one of our Colorado 
members, writes : 

I have just finished the article on mas- 
sena quail in the March number of the 
Game Breeder and I will add my expe- 
rience and observations of the little bird. 

I have found them in west Texas in 
the vicinity of Sanderson ; in the Santa 
Rosa mountains of the state of Coahuila, 
Mexico, and in the Sierre Madre moun- 
tains, in both Chihuahua and Sonora 
states. As I have only hunted in the 
mountains in these different localities I 
cannot say whether they are found in 
the lower or level parts or not. 

In the article reference is made to 
their food being principally insects, I 
have examined the crops of several in 
each locality where I have found them 
and have always observed them to con- 
tain bulbs of a certain onion-like plant. 

I find them very gentle and they take 
cover and lay closer than the bob-white 
and they are a little smaller in size ; the 
breast and back are speckled not un- 
like the guinea fowl and they make a 
noise much like the latter. 

I have a mounted pair in my collection 
which I shot on my first hunting trip 
in Mexico. 

Yours very truly, 

W. H. Pigg. 
Colorado. 

Decoy Owls. 

The Minnesota Game and Fish De- 
partment recommends the use of decoy 
owls for crow and hawk shooting. These 
owls can be procured from Fred Sauter, 
taxidermist, 42 Bleecker street. New 
York. All game shooting clubs and pre- 
serve owners should have a decoy owl. 
It will produce some lively shooting and 
will save a lot of game birds. 

We are strongly in favor of big pub- 
lic parks where the public can shoot. If 
the sportsmen who are interested in game 
breeding will form game shooting clubs 
to rent the shooting on many of the 
posted farms and the state will properly 
look after the game on public lands and 
waters, including parks especially pro-. 



vided for shooting, soon there will be 
an abundance of game for all hands. 

It seems absurd to talk about shooting 
only for dukes and lords. We are inter- 
ested in many game shooting clubs with 
small dues and those who wish to do so 
should sell some of the game produced 
in order to help pay their expenses. 

The game protection society which 
will rent some of the posted farms and 
provide shooting for its members will 
find it is quite as easy to have more game 
as it is to have more game laws. 

The more we think about it the more 
we become convinced that too much time 
and effort are devoted to securing more 
laws and sot enough time and effort are 
given to producing more game. 

Movements of Keepers. 

J. H. Wise has gone to the Long Isl- 
and Game Breeders Association; Mrs. 
Simpson remains as housekeeper. Wm. 
Butler has gone to the Kings County 
game farm in Washington. Ralf Lee 
goes to the Outpost farm. A good lot 
of game will be produced at all the 
places no doubt. 

Game keepers changing their situa- 
tions should give prompt notice to the 
magazine in order that their new address 
can appear on our mailing list. 

"Yours for more game and fewer 
game laws" often appears at the end of 
letters received by the Game Breeder. 

Crows. 

Mr. A. H. Berwald in Du Pont Mag- 
azine tells about a man in Bradford, 
Pa., who was able to call crows within 
easy range by imitating the hooting of 
an owl. The decoy owl made to attract 
crows also certainly does the work. A 
man who can imitate the hoot of the owl 
should be especially fatal in connection 
with the stuffed decoy. 

Many men can call crows simply by 
imitating their cawing. The keeper at 
the Climax Kennel Club was very good 
at calling crows and the editor of the 
Game Breeder saw him call a crow from 
a great distance and shoot it within easy 
range. The imitation of the hoot of an 



84 



THE GAME BREEDER 



owl will call hawks as well as crows 
and the imitation of the crow's cawing 
surely will bring a lot of birds if it be 
well done. A decoy owl mounted on a 
pole in connection with some good hoot- 
ing or cawing surely will keep the guns 
hot in a place where crows are abun- 
dant. This combination easily should 
win a Du Pont crow prize. Sauter, the 
New York taxidermist, makes and sells 
the decoy owl ; a little practice will make 
a good hooter or cawer. 

More Quail. 

Mr. Montanus of the Middle Island 
Quail Club reports the quail as abun- 
dant and good shooting is anticipated. 
This club has found it is not a difficult 
matter to have good quail shooting every 
season and to keep mischief makers off 
of Long Island. 

Unsatisfactory Records. 

Mr. Perry of the Western Game 
Breeders Association reports some ra- 
ther unsatisfactory experiments with 
eggs of aviary and game species shipped 
various distances. We are inclined to 
agree with him that the record "looks 
pretty rotten." Since many have had 
good results using eggs shipped long 
distances the poor result reported is not 
necessarily due to the shipping. If the 
eggs were purchased from reliable deal- 
ers, as they no doubt were, it would 
seem likely that the trouble was due to 
delays in setting the eggs or some other 
error after the eggs were received. It 
does not seem likely that such a large 
percentage of eggs shipped from vari- 
ous points and for various distances 
should have failed to hatch simply on 
account of the transfer. Express compa- 
nies are not as careful as they should be 
either in the handling of eggs or live 
birds. Since the business promises soon 
to be a big one because it is profitable, 
the express companies should take every 
care to see that eggs and birds are care- 
fully handled in order that those who 
may become big annual customers of the 
express companies may have small losses 
due to shipments. 



The Record Sent by Mr. Perry. 

From Oregon one dozen Reeves eggs 
hatched two chicks, raised two. 

From Oregon one dozen Silver eggs 
hatched two chicks, raised two. 

From Oregon three dozen Golden 
eggs hatched no chicks, raised none. 

From Oregon two dozen Amherst eggs 
hatched one chick, killed in nest. 

From Kentucky one-half dozen Swin- 
hoe eggs hatched no chicks, raised none. 

From Kentucky four dozen Ringneck 
eggs hatched six chicks, raised six. 

From Virginia one dozen wild turkey 
eggs hatched no chicks, raised none. 

From Kansas nine dozen Ringneck 
eggs hatched seven chicks, raised five. 

From Illinois one dozen Ringneck 
eggs hatched eight chicks, raised seven. 

From Illinois one dozen wood-duck 
eggs hatched five chicks, raised none. 

With the exception of the Illinois ring- 
neck record the results are all bad. Any- 
thing less than fifty per cent raised is 
not good. The Illinois record referred 
to is very satisfactory for a beginner; 
in fact, most gamie keepers, year after 
year, would be well satisfied to rear seven 
birds from every dozen eggs set. Mr. 
Perry adds that in his own home-pro- 
duced eggs gave him 80 to 100 per cent 
hatches but none of a dozen of his eggs 
sent to Nebraska hatched. He concludes 
"Where lies. the trouble?" 

Since Mr. Perry was brave enough 
tc send the above record we trust some 
of our readers will tell him where they 
believe the trouble lies. Our guess is 
that it is partly due to transportation, 
partly to some local cause which can be 
remedied when it is ascertained. 

We hope other readers will send hatch- 
ing records. We shall publish some 
from the Long Island Game Breeders 
Association. 



Moose and Wolf. 

Walter Howard Eaton in the Protec- 
tive Association Bulletin says there are 
at present, so far as the game wardens 
can estimate, thirteen moose wandering 
in Berkshire, Mass., and perhaps brows- 
ing over the range of the New York side. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



85 



They are to be sure an escape from the 
old Wm. C. Whitney game preserve on 
October mountain, near Lenox. Four 
got loose ten years ago. One was shot, 
for which the hunters were fined $250 
apiece. Since then the remaining three 
have roamed in comparative safety and 
increased their tribe. Automobile tour- 
ists do not see them, but they are here. 

More surprising than the moose, how- 
ever, was the animal shot by the game- 
keeper for the New Marlboro Game As- 
sociation (composed of a group of New 
Yorkers who own 14,000 acres of wild 
country east of Great Barrington) on 
the second day of December, 1918. This 
animal had got into the inclosure where 
the wild geese were penned and had 
killed and was carrying off a fifteen- 
pound goose. Cornered in a fence he 
could not jump the animal turned sav- 
agely on the gamekeeper, who gave it 
both barrels of his shotgun, almost blow- 
ing its head off. It was a gray or tim- 
ber wolf. 

I don't know how long it is since a 
timber wolf was shot in Massachusetts, 
but I don't remember hearing of such a 
case. Certainly the skin of this animal 
stretched and dryed on the barn door 
was the first one I ever saw east of the 
Michigan pine plains. It was a big 
fellow, too, an inch or two over the 
standard, 4 feet 9 inches. When a snow- 
shoe tramp in the beautiful Berkshires 
includes the possibility of crossing the 
track of a bull moose and connecting up 
with a timber wolf, things are lapsing 
back a century ! 

What It Costs. 

Often we have inquiries as to what it 
costs to breed a wild duck, pheasant, 
quail, etc. Since these inquiries keep 
coming we can not answer all of them by 
writing long letters. In fact we do not 
know the cost in the particular place 
from which many letters come. 

It costs much more to rear a duck, 
for example, on a small place where there 
are no natural foods than it does on a 
larger place where natural foods are 
abundant either on the place or in the 
immediate vicinity. Ducks will fly out 



to feed and return to places where they 
are properly looked after. It will prob- 
ably cost as much to feed a duck ex- 
clusively on purchased corn throughout 
the year as the duck is worth, but if 
many eggs are sold these should pay the 
food bill. We know places where ducks 
have been wintered with very little arti- 
ficial feeding, almost none in some cases. 
The cheapest kind of foods often are 
waste products grown on the place, tur- 
nips, potatoes and other vegetables not 
suitable for the market. 

The cost of a hand-reared pheasant 
varies in different places and always it 
is higher than the cost of a wild-bred 
pheasant which obtains much of its food 
in field and wood. Hand-reared quail 
cost more than wild-bred quail, the last 
named in some places cost nothing after 
suitable wild foods and covers have been 
planted, excepting the cost of protecting 
the birds from their natural enemies. 

In the northern states a little food in 
winter is desirable. In the southern 
states this is not necessary except on 
places where a very large number of 
quail are bred and a large breeding stock 
is left after the shooting. 

Some of the commercial game farms 
and some of the game clubs and owners 
of country places are beginning to keep 
accounts of the cost and we hope some 
of our readers who do this will send us 
letters telling just what it costs to rear 
a given number of birds. We all know 
the good prices obtained for birds and 
eggs. 

Undoubtedly some of the commercial 
game farms keep the cost of rearing low- 
er than such costs are on private pre- 
serves and even on state game farms. 
The last named purchase many birds and 
eggs ; some of the clubs now have birds 
reared by contract. 

Not Otherwise. 

It is not a difficult matter to hand- 
rear thousands of pheasants, quail and 
wild ducks on comparatively small rear- 
ing fields. It often is found very diffi- 
cult to introduce and establish hand- 
reared birds all over a country place with 

(Continued on page 88) 



86 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?5 Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Ebjted by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, JUNE, 1919. 
TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 

E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



As the prohibition of drinking comes 
in the prohibition of game eating seems 
to be going out. Already there are in- 
quiries if the game dinners of the Con- 
servation Society, which were suspend- 
ed during the war, will be resumed. They 
will be. 

Quail on toast surely is coming back. 
Members of the society report that thou- 
sands of quail will be produced this year 
on the game farms and preserves in the 
free states and the toast we have al- 
ways had with us. 

"And when the pie was opened the 
birds began to sing." Suggestive of quail 
pie in Ohio when these birds now on 
the song-bird list become an abundant 
food. It will not be long. Common 
sense is returning. 



BACK TO THE LAND. 

The World says : A speaker at the 
convention of booksellers in Boston held 
out the cheering prospect to the trade 
that Prohibition after July 1 would com- 
pel many people to seek solace in read- 
ing, which is all right in its way, pro- 
vided the publishers quit manufactur- 
ing novels warranted to drive people to 
drink. 



Our specialty is books and bulletins 
on game breeding; including the maga- 
zine for game breeders, warranted to 
send people to live in the country on 
places where there is enough freedom to 
permit the restoration of quail on toast 
and possibly a little near cider as a side 
line. 



A FEELING IN THE BONES. 

Mr. Aldo Leopold, a New Mexico 
reader, says : "I feel it in my bones that 
to make food production one of the main 
objects of game conservation will even- 
tually lead to trouble." Many years ago 
we had the same feeling in our bones, 
but we have learned that our bone ba- 
rometer was faulty. Under the impres- 
sion that the sale of game hastened its 
disappearance and that the game laws 
were not properly executed we joined 
one of the strongest and best equipped 
game protective associations in America. 
This association employed detectives to' 
discover and lawyers to prosecute game 
law violators, and among many others 
we arrested and convicted the hotel 
keeper where we often dined. 

We secured many restrictive laws and 
we placed the wild turkey on the song- 
bird list so that no one could even shoot 
it. We closed the quail shooting for 
terms of years. During the time when 
turkey shooting was prohibited the tur- 
key became extinct. The quail vanished 
rapidly on our favorite shooting grounds 
after the sale of the birds was prohibited 
and prevented and notwithstanding the 
fact that most of the farms in the neigh- 
borhood were posted and tlie farmers, 
did their best to keep out the shooters — ■ 
including ourselves. A little pond where 
we shot ducks was drained and the place 
where we often shot a few dozen jack 
snipe also was drained. Houses were 
built along a little river once frequented 
by many ducks and there was probably a 
gun in every house. The duck shooting 
ccame to an end because every one was 
willing and eager to destroy any fowl 
that put in an appearance and no one 
knew enough to look after the ducks. 
Quail shooting in the state is now pro- 
hibited forever. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



87 



By keeping sortie of the game laws off 
of Long Island, N. Y., we have found 
it an easy matter to have shooting quite 
near the great city which contains one- 
twentieth of the population of the United 
States. The shooting is kept open not 
only for those who produce the quail, 
pheasants, etc., but also for any one who 
wishes to shoot, since comparatively lit- 
tle land is used for game breeding. 

It costs something to purchase stock 
birds and to restore the shooting. The 
sale of some of the game always makes 
it possible for people of small means to 
have shooting if they wish to do so. 
There can be no doubt that the people 
who are said to own the game should at 
least have some game to eat if those who 
produce it are willing to sell it. 



OUR DESIRE TO BE HELPFUL. 

Our comment on the California Game 
Commission was intended to be helpful. 
The commissioners say in their excel- 
lent annual report that they have at- 
tempted to induce private parties to breed 
game without success; that the people 
seem to prefer poultry. 

It seems peculiar that the California 
people are unwilling to get into a most 
interesting and attractive industry which 
easily can be made far more profitable 
than poultry. It is as easy to gather and 
sell eggs which bring $3 and $4 per 
dozen as it is to sell 50-cent eggs. Since 
thousands of people are breeding game 
in other states it occurred to us that 
probably the California commission was 
not encouraging the new industry. As 
,we said, readers of the Game Breeder in 
Oregon, Washington and many other 
states are prepared to supply the people 
of California with plenty of game birds, 
provided the California m'arkets be 
opened to the sale of the desirable food. 
To make a food industry good it is de- 
sirable to have the food eaten. 

If poultry men can sell and the game 
breeders can not sell food in California 
this would seem to account for the diffi- 
culty the commissioners complain about 
in their report. It may be the entire 
trouble is in the game laws, but some of 



the actions of game officers no doubt also 
may affect the situation. 

For example, when a California far- 
mer takes some quail eggs from the wa- 
ter of an irrigated field and hatches 80 
quail we think it has a bad effect on the 
industry if the Los Angeles deputy game 
commissioner drops in and tells the far- 
mer he can avoid an arrest provided he 
pays $800 fine for this food-producing 
crime; we should say if she would pay 
$800, since in the case we have in mind 
the game farmer was a California wom- 
an. It is true the officer came down in 
his price from time to time, and when 
the Game Conservation Society offered 
to telegraph $300 to begin the lady's de- 
fence the matter was dropped. 

We think this and some other per- 
formances which we can bring to the 
attention of the game commission may 
make it difficult for the commission to 
induce people to produce the food as 
abundantly as the people now do in the 
free states where no attempts are made 
to lift $800 or any other sum from those 
guilty of the crime of food production. 

If the commission would like to have 
the difficulty referred to in its annual 
report investigated by the legislature we 
will help. We believe such an investi- 
gation will be proper and helpful to the 
commission. 



BEWARE OF THE CAT. 

In well settled regions there are nu- 
merous checks to the increase of game 
besides shooting and the natural en- 
emies of the game. The loss of the 
natural foods and covers and the ex- 
posure of game birds to climate and their 
natural enemies often are sufficient to 
exterminate the game. When cats and 
dogs are added to the other checks to 
increase we have learned that we must 
either prohibit shooting or encourage 
some of the people to look after the 
game. 

The cats, both the innocent looking 
tame animals which live in houses and 
thousands of cats which once were tame 
but now live wild in the woods, are 
known to be a fatal check to the in- 
crease of upland game birds. Experi- 



88 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ments in game breeding made by the 
Game Conservation Society and many 
others have proved conclusively that 
cats both wild and tame are very de- 
structive to many species of birds. 

The Hon. W. C. Adams, chairman of 
the Massachusetts Game Commission, 
says, "One cat which was watched care- 
fully was seen to kill 58 birds in a 
single season." 

The Massachusetts commission was 
among the first of the state departments 
to recognize the necessity for looking 
after the game properly and always it 
has welcomed and encouraged the assist- 
ance of garnie breeders who produce 
many thousands of game birds every 
year and who aid in destroying the cats 
and other vermin. The Massachusetts 
commission conducts able and valuable 
experiments with the quail and other, 
game birds and its annual reports easily 
rank first in value among all of the re- 
ports published in the United States and 
Canada. 

Massachusetts with its large popula- 
tion and severe climate is by no means 
the easiest place to protect and increase 
the game, but the shooting is kept open 
for all hands and it is significant that it 
is necessary to prohibit shooting in states 
where there should be an abundance of 
game. 



Aviary Pheasants on the Preserve. 

Many preserve owners and clubs are 
beginning to breed a few ornamental 
pheasants as a side line. A good keeper 
easily can produce a few dozen Reeves, 
Golden, Amhersts and others. The 
skins make handsome hats for the ladies. 



(Continued from page 85) 

the idea of having them breed wild in 
many fields and woods in order that the 
shooting always will be good. There is 
a way of sending the tame birds back to 
a wild breeding existence but the vermin 
must be controlled. 

We are opposed to otherwise than by 
shooting laws and regulations because 
shooting is the inducement to make the 
game abundant on many places. 



Wild Breeding Ducks. 

We are much interested in some of the 
places where hand-reared ducks have 
been turned down in marshes and in- 
duced to find all or a good part of their 
food. The birds seem to be stronger on 
the wing than most hand-reared ducks 
are. There is, of course, a decided sav- 
ing in the food bill where the ducks are 
only fed once in a day or only occasion- 
ally during the week. It has been proved 
that a very little food will hold a good 
lot of ducks on a ground where there are 
some natural foods ; that the birds will 
nest and rear their young without any 
artificial feeding for the young birds. 
We hope to secure some illustrated sto- 
ries about some of these places where 
the crop is harvested by shooting. 



A Failure to Fertilize. 

Could you give me a little informa- 
tion regarding the raising of wild Can- 
ada geese?. 

I purchased a pair early in April but 
up to this timie the goose has not started 
to lay, neither have I seen the gander 
try to fertilize the goose which made 
me wonder whether they need water deep 
enough to swim in. 

The man from whom I purchased 
them said that this pair raised young last 
year. 

I am feeding them chicken chowder 
and scratch feed mixed and all of the 
greens they wish to pick. They seem 
now to be acquainted with their sur- 
roundings but they are' not in a very se- 
cluded spot. Would this have anything 
to do with them not breeding? 

Any information that you might give 
me will be appreciated. 

Wm. L. Zeller. 

[Illinois wild-geese breeders say it is best 
for the geese to have water to swim in during 
the mating season. It is believed that other- 
wise the eggs will not be fertile. The geese 
need grass, of course. Many breeders rear 
the young birds away from the pond. We 
shall publish some articles written by success- 
ful breeders of wild-geese — the question of 
seclusion probably depends upon the wildness 
of the birds— usually geese become quite tame. 
—Editor.] 



THE GAME BREEDER 



89 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants j 

WRITE TOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

. Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



m**xmtma\wmim 



■\-.<, 



S* 



F. B. DUSETTE & SONS' GAME RANCH 



BAD AXE, MICH, 



BREEDERS OF: 



Pure Wild Mallards, Black Ducks, 
Wild Turkeys and Bob White Quail 

Our game is grown on our 240- Acre Ranch, with natural feed on 
our Several Lakes, which makes our stock very attractive for 
Breeders, Shootipg Clubs and Preserve Owners at a minimum 
price. Our birds comply with the Federal regulations which 
permit shooting and sale. 

Contracts Now Open for August and September 
No Eggs for Sale This Season 

F. B. DUSETTE & SONS, BAD AXE, MICH. 



90 



THE GAME BREEDER 




TEINCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. M. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 

GRAND ISLAND, ERIE: CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 

extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 



Member of The Game Guild. 



Member American Game Breeders Society. 



THE HONEYSWEET 

BLACK RASPBERRY 

Best for Home and Market 

The bushes make good cover for game. 

Strawberry and Asparagus Plants. 

Price Lists Free. 

A. B. KATKAMIER MACEDON, N. Y. 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young's Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



JSL 


BOOK ON 


^■B^ 


DOG DISEASES 


>5§Pfar 


And How to Feed 


••MfP 


Mailed free to any address by 


America's 


the Author 


Pioneer 


H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 


Dog Medicines 


118 West 31st Street, New York 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies. pigeons, t etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

50c a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S-, 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 91 



Galvanized 
STEEL WIRE NETTING 

for Game Farms and Preserves 

We are prepared to quote lowest prices for all widths 
up to 72 inches from ^ to 2 inch mesh and No. 
14 to 20 gauge. We can guarantee prompt deliv- 
ery to any point. 

If you are going to start a game ranch, farm or 
preserve this year or contemplate enlarging your 
old one, get our prices before placing your order 
elsewhere. 

Price list on application. 

HAVERSTICK & COMPANY, Inc. Trenton, New Jersey. 



THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS 

of BERRY, KENTUCKY 

offer for sale, Setters and Pointers, Fox and Cat Hounds, Wolf 
and Deer Hounds, Coon and Opossum Hounds, Varmint and 
Rabbit Hounds, Bear and Lion Hounds, also Airedale terriers. 
All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser alone to judge the quality, 
satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. Sixty-eight page, 
highly illustrated, instructive, and interesting catalogue for 
ten cents in stamps or coin.. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



92 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE 



It Is Now Legal to Trap Wild 
Fowl for Breeding Purposes 

Write to The Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, for information about Trapping Permits 

The book, OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS, written by the 
Editor of The Game Breeder, contains full information about the 
trapping of wild fowl and how to rear the birds for profit and 
for sport. There are chapters on How to Form Shooting Clubs ; 
How to Control the Enemies of Wild Fowl, ttc. Fully illustrated 
with pictures of ducks on preserves, etc. 

PRICE, #2.00 POSTPAID 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St, NEW YORK 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 




Decoy Owls for Crow and Hawk Shooting 
Established 1860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

ERED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America 

42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers pleai! mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



93 




Wc Arc Now 

Booking 

Orders for 

Eggs 

for Spring Delivery from the following vari- 
eties of pheasants : Silver, Golden. Ringneck, 
Lady Amherst, Formosan. White, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Swinhne, Versicolor. Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchunan Eared, Melanotus, Black- 
throated Golden, Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, Long- 
tails, and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff Orping- 
ton and R. I. Red fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan and Fancy Ducks, 
Doves of several varieties. Deer. Jack 
Rabbits 

Send $1.00 in stamps for Colortype Catalogue 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 

CHINESE PHEASANT EGGS, $3.00 A DOZEN. CAM 

use tame squirrel and Hungarian Partridge Eggs 

P W. SGHWEHM, 4219 4th Ave., N. E., Seattle, Wash- 

ington. 2t 

PHEASANTS WANTED 

I will buy ringnecked pheasants regardless of sex at 
long as they are strong, healthy birds, large and no 
over two years old. Will purchase small or large num- 
bers for cash. Reference by permission to the Game 
Breeder. ROBT. BOWMAN, care Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

BANTAMS — GOOD GENTLE BIRDS .SUITABLE 
for quail and pheasant breeding JOHN E. DARBY. 
Prop., Maplehurst Poultry Farm, Croswell, Michigan. 

BANTAMS — WIL BERT'S FAMOUS BANTAMS. 
Forty varieties. Shipped on approval. Catalog 30 
F. C. WILBERT, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



WANTED 

Twenty=Five Sportsmen 

to join me in an exclusive hunting 
and fishing club. Property in Orange 
and Sullivan Counties, N. Y., adjoin- 
ing the Hartwood Club, the Merrie- 
wold Club and the famous Chester 
W. Chapin game preserve. For par- 
ticulars, apply to 

J. S. HOLDEIM, PORT JERVIS, N.Y. 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 
Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



EGGS 



HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
102. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky.. 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
L a year. 



TWO THOUSAND PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. 
Pure Chinese, $3.50 per dozen. Ringnecks, Golden, 
Silver and Mallard Duck, $3.00 per dozen, 120.00 per 
hundred. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL FARM, 
Manzanita, Oregon. 4t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. $25.00 

per 100. Golden Pheasant Eggs, 60c. each. Day old 

Pheasants, 60c. each. Booking orders now. Mrs. EDGAR 

TILTON.Suffern, N.Y. |t 

STOCK AND EGGS OF RINGNECKS, LADY 
Amherst, Golden and Silver Pheasants. Wild strain 
Mallards. Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams. 
" Ringlet " Barred Plvraouth Rock Chickens. Peafowl. 
MRS. IVER CHRISTENSON, Jamestown, Kansas. 
No. 1. 6t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



94 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 
Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 





PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 

REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
Member of the Game Guild. 

PHEASANT EGGS AND PHEASANTS 

Pheasant eggs for sale up to 
May 15, $25.00 per hundred. 
110 eggs sent for cash with 
order after May 15, $20 per 
110 eggs. Pheasants for Sep- 
tember and October delivery. 
Write for prices. GEORGE 
BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
R No. 1, Englishtown, New 
Jersey.. 



LIVE GAME, ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 









Mallard-Pintail 



DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids g 
Theseducks are reared onfreerange ~- 
especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. 1 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.50 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 

ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated " 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, " 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Youra for More Gam*.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



95 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game, " written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggsin season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WILD MALLARD DUCKS 
AND EGGS 

Birds Strong Flyers, Manitoba Stock 

Eggs - - Per hundred, $20.00 
Ducks - - - Per pair, 3.50 

HEMLOCKS GAME FARM 

Box 1011 

Bridgeport, Conn. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING-PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 egg*. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, North Carolina. 8t 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 

FOX AND MINK WANTED 

Wanted — Pair red fox pups : also breeders ; pair mink 
and marten R. H. BARKER, 2034 East Fourth St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. It 

LIVE GAME 

AMHERST, REEVES, SILVER AND MONGOLIAN 
Pheasant eggs $5.00 a dozen, two dozen, $9.00. Chinese 
Ringnecks, $3-50 a dozen, $2500 a hundred. Mongolians, 
S35 00 a hundred "Pheasant Farming," illustrated, 50c. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 2 t 

WANTED TO BUY PHEASANTS ..I WANT 

Silvers. Lady Amherst. Golden and Reeves. 
Quote Prices, Ages, and Quantity. 

Morgan's. Phsntry, 244 &• 61st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



WILD TURKEYS- 

in this issue. W. 

County, Pa. 



For prices see display advertisement 
J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 



PHEASANTS FOR SALE— RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoe?, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS.. Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3t 

GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 

fifty cents a piece. FOXHOLLOW FARM, Rhine- 

beck, New York. It 

PHEASANTS AND EGGS FOR SALE. GOLDENS. 

Lady Amhersts, Versicolors, Manchurian Eared. Gold, 

en Eggs $5.00, and Lady Amherst $7.00 per dozen- 

ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, Canada. 2t 



RAISE SILVER FOXES. NEW SYNDICATE JUST 
started. N:w plan. Not much money needed. Your 
location will not interfere. Particulars free. C. T. DRYZ, 
5244 South Maplewood Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 2i Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue, 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas* 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest, 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans.Wild Duoks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

FOR SALE—PHEASANTS, PEA FOWL, PIGEONS, 
Poultry, Bantams and Pit Games. Eggs from the 
above stock for sale. Rabbits. Cavies, Squirrels, fur 
bearing animals, etc. I buy, sell and exchange. L. L 
KIRKPATRICK, Box 273, Bristol, Tenn. 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



Pheasants Wanted 

WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. at 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters : "Yours for More Game.' 



98 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FIVE VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. WILD DUCKS. 

Wild Geese, Brants. Wild Turkeys and other Game, 

List for stamp. G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville, Illinois. 4 t 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— FOR FANCY DUCKS, 
geese or pheasants. 15 pair of 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds. Ducks 88.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton, Ohio. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS FOR SALE. LARGE, HARDY 

specimens. Satisfaction guaranteed. LEWIS 

COMPTON, Dias Creek, New Jersey. 2t 

HAVE SIX MALE CANVASBACKS FOR SALE, 
$10.00 each or will exchange for wood duck pairs. 
These are hand raised from pure wild stock. Have a few 
canvasback eggs for sale, $12.00 per dozen. A. WOLFE, 
9848 76th Ave., Edmonton, S., Alberta, Canada It 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE, THE GREATEST 

rabbit for flesh and fur in the world. Send for full 
information and price list. SIBERIAN FUR FARM, 
Hamilton, Canada. 6t 



EGGS 

PHEASANT EGGS — RINGNECK. $2.50 PER 13. 

Wild Mallard Eggs. $1.50 per 11. JOHN SAMMONS. 

Yankton, South Dakota. 2t 

GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS, $S,00 per dozen. Cash 
with order. F. W. DANE, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD DUCK EGGS FOR SALE— 
From my New Jersey farm, pure bred, light gray wild 
mallard duck eggs. Stock strong on wing. $3.50 per 13 ; 
$25.00 per 100. H. W. VAN ALEN, 215 Montague St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 2t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



IF YOU WOULD BE SUCCESSFUL IN RAISING 
a high per cent of your baby birds — quail, pheasants, 
wild turkeys, etc., feed them MEAL WORMS, a choice, 
clean, insect food. 500, $1.00; 1,000, $1.50 ; 5,000, $5.00. 
Express prepaid. See last year s advertisements in April, 
June and August numbers. C. R. KERN, Mount Joy, 
Pennsylvania. 2t 



GAMEKEEPERS 

GAMEKEEPER AT LIBERTY. RELIABLE, WANTS 
position on club preserve or game farm. Experienced 
on game and ornamental birds or animals, gun dogs and 
extermination of vermin. MILTON, in care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 



WANTED —POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A. S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y'. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. THOR- 

oughly experienced in rearing Pheasants. Wild Turkeys 

and Wild Ducks. Good references. GAMEKEEPER, 

463 East 67th St., N.Y. C. it 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER WITH 
a game shooting club or preserve owner. Experienced 
in bieeding all species of game, dog breaking and the 
control of vermin. Good reierences. WM. J. STRANG, 
care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

YOUNG MAN, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN 
service. General knowledge of game breeding and 
farming. Exceptional dairy experience. Thoroughly 
experienced in handling pedigreed horses, cattle and 
sheeo. Best reference. Availabl e right away. J. A. 
TYLER, care of THOMAS MacINTYRE, 9129 121st 
Street, Richmond Hill, Long Island, N. Y. 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mon«olians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes. 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared, 
ROBINSON BROS., AJdershoi, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Excellent 
references. Age 36, married. W. E. B., care of The 
Game Bieeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house ol six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and' 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



In writing: to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 1 ' 




Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 &1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 beat 
Royal Swans of England. I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Rtngneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under oractically natural conditions. I have BO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only fiO miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 





WM. J. MACKENSEN 



Department V. 



YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of Tbe Game Guild 




Game Farm or Preserve 



A large tract of land suitable for a game farm or 
preserve is offered for sale at an attractive price. 

The land is near New York on a good Automobile 
Road and contains a large pond and stream. There 
are some trout and the waters can be made to yield 
large numbers of these fish. The land is suitable for 
deer, upland game and wild ducks. I shall be pleased 
to show this property to anyone wishing to start a 
game farm or preserve. 

The place is within fifty miles of the City and can be 
reached by Automobile in an hour and a half. 

For particulars address, 

===== OWNER =========== 



Care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York 



§n 



$>1°° perYear 



TllllllllllnlllllllidllllllllllHIIIIIIIIllllllllHIHHH 



Sinflle Co pies 10 g 



THt 



GANE BREEDER 



VOL. XV 



JULY, 1919 



No. 4 



//i! 






the* object op this magazine is 
to make: north america the 5i6gest 
Game Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — More Game and Fewer Game .Laws- 
Should Be No Controversy — Shooting On Farms — Sporting 
Breeders — Free Shooting — Game Farms and Game Breeders 
— Natural Enemies -Game Markets. 

Mental Recreation in Game Breeding - G. H. Corsan 

More About Game Enemies - Massachusetts Commissioners 
Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - By Our Readers 
Trapping Quail - Quail Breeding at Marshfleld — Wood 
Pigeons— More Gray Partridges — Advice to State Game 
Officers — Our Best Game Bird— More About Wo 3d Pigeons 
— Mexican Bobwhites — Partridges and Foxes — Swinhoes — 
More Eggs — More Crows — Remedial — Pheasants and Pigs 
— More Silkies — More About Democracy — Putting in the 
Pep— A Famous Booklet — Hercules Powder Company Ad- 
vertising — Grouse — Quail in Oregon — Quail Breeders — 
Popular Game Preserving — More Law — American Game— 
A New Member — Thousands More. 
Editorials— Death of a Beneficial — We're All Doing It — Rules 
of the Trade — Peculiar Ideas of Democracy — Outings and 
Innings, Trade Notes, Etc. 



Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July q, 1915, at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 





1%; 



P U a LI3HCD BY 

'HE* GAME- C0NSER\M10N SOCIETY, inc., 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A C»3>*vSj./s 



Hi)iiiiHiiiniiii;i;i!!!ii!ini!ii3iiiiinii;i;(Eiiii[<iii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiiiiHiiHiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniin!((iiiiHiiHiiiK,'ii.,: 



\K 




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dogs in perfect health and strength. 

Spratt's Biscuits do not contain added sugar 
or chemicals, which are frequently introduced 
to make inferior foods attractive. 



11 Spratt's Dog Culture" 

illustrates and describes 
the food for YOUR dog. 



Write for a copy {stating breed) 




a 




SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED, 



Newark, N. J 



San Francisco, Calif. St. Louis, Mo. 

FACAORY ALSO IN LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Look for the Trade Mark "X" on every Biscuit 



Cleveland, Ohio. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



97 




The Big 
Fourteen 

*HESE are the fourteen standard brands 



of loaded shells and the shell you shoot is 




T 

among them. 

Remember — you can always get your favorite 
shell loaded with Infallible or "E.C." if you 
ask for it and insist on getting it. You can 

buy any one of the fourteen shells listed at the 

loaded with one of the 



right 



HERCULES 

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trigger — it's the ponuder that does the ivork. And it is of the 
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Hercules Smokeless Shotgun Powders are alnxjays depend- 
able. They always burn evenly, give even patterns, high 
velocity and light recoil. 

The next time that you buy shells, look on the top wad 
for the name Infallible or "E. C." 



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98 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Let your trap gun purchase be a PARKER. 
Be one of the thousands of satisfied PARKER 
Gun users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The 
purchaser of a PARKER Gun receives in good sub- 
stantial gun value, the benefits of experience in gun 
manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never 
be satisfied with anything but the BEST. _ _ _ __ _ __ __ _ -— _ 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not rAKftLK BKOS. 

now? Master Gun Makers MERIDEN, CONN., U. S. A 

Send for catalogue and free booklet about 20 bore guns. New York Salesrooms, 25 Murray Street 



AJUill*ix-cl^, Teal, Qtxetil 

ct zx c3L 

* 


Pure-bred Birds Raised Under Semi-Natural Conditions 


Z. TED DeKALMAR, R. f. D. No. 30, 


Stamford, Conn. 


STATE GAME LICENSE No 123. FEDERAL I 


PERMIT No. 1. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 



Ringnecks Chinese 

Silver Amherst 



Reeves Golden 

Japanese Silky Fowl 



Book your order for eggs now. Eggs in any quantity from the 
Japanese Silky — Rhpde Island Red Cross. The perfect mother 
tor large breeders of Pheasants. 

We have one of the largest exclusive Game Breeding Farms in the U. S., and we 
warrant every bird we ship to be in prime condition for breeding or show purposes. 

We are now contracting full wing Ringnecks in any quantity up to 5,000 for 
August and early fall delivery. 

If you want some splendid Chinese-Mongolian cocks for new blood in your pens, 
and are willing to pay $} each for them, send us a check. Hens $4.50. 
Expensive, but they're worth it. Member of the Game Guild 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY, 



MARMOT, OREGON 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



99 



3 lJlg DU PONT AMERICAN liiUSTHES mm mBJ 

pi ! ■ - - —— ■ —— . — - ■ i - i — , — ■ — —I — — ?■■'■ 




th A 



nnua 



1 




Trapshooting Event 

FreeTiophies forlrapshooting Clubs 




B 



Smokeless 

Shotgun 

Powders 

leaders for over a century — 
are the choice of the Nation's 
crack trapshots. Look for 
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when you purchase shells. 

DU PONT - BALLIST1TE 
SCHULTZE 



Learn to shoot. Know how to handle and use a gun. 
Sharpen your judgment. Quicken your mental speed. 

Trapshooting* 

is the reconstructive Sport for modern men and women — and partic- 
ularly for the business man. It demands concentration — the kind of 
concentration that takes you completely away from business cares 
and worries. It sends you back clearer and keener in thought and 
judgment. 

Beginners' Day Shoots 

will be held at hundreds of gun clubs during June and July. Why 
not attend? Get a taste of the game's fascination. Don't let pride 
or timidity stop you. The gun club is the place to learn and the old 
timers will be glad to welcome and help you. 

Write today for full information and name of nearest gun club. 

SPORTING POWDER DIVISION 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE. 



The Principal du Pont Products are : 



Explosives: Industrial, Agricultural and sporting. Chemicals: Pyroxylin Solutions, Ethers, Bronzing Liquids, 
Coal Tar Distillates, Commercial Acids, Alums, etc. Leather Substitutes: Fabrikoid Upholstery, Rayntite 
Top Material, Fairfield Rubber Cloth. Pyroxylin Plastics: Ivory, Shell and Transparent Py-ra-lin, Py-ra-lin 
Specialties, Challenge Cleanable Collars and Cuffs. Paints and Varnishes: For Industrial and Home Uses. 
Pigments and Colors in Oil: For Industrial Uses. Lithopone : For Industrial Uses. Stains, Fillers, 
Lacquers and Enamels: For Industrial and Home Uses. Dyestuffs: Coal Tar Dyestuffs and Intermediates. 

For full information address : Advertising Division, E. I. du Pont de Nemours £r Co., Wilmington, Delaware. 



Visit the Trapshooting School, Young's Pier, Atlantic City, N. J- 



'mam 



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100 



THE GAME BREEDER 



More American 

Reserve Power 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



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Painted for Remington UMC 
by F. X. Leyendcckcr 







B' 



OXH to the man himself and to all about him, the strength that comes 

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No poison-pollen or Ola \A/orld imperialism g'one to seed can contaminate — 

nor any attempt or crowd-sickened collectivism undermine — the priceless 

individualism or the American who truly keeps his feet on the earth. 

Are you one or America s five million hunters, planning a trip for big game — ana reserve power ? 

Our Service Department will be glad to nelp you complete' arrangements — tell what to take, 11 
you •wish — report on hunting districts — give addresses and rates or best hunting camps and guides^ 

Or ask your local dealer, tne alert Remington UMC merchant — one or more than 82,^00 in 
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Guides, Outfitters, Camp Proprietors — "Write for registration blank for Remington UMC free service. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the World 

WOOLWORTH BUILDING NEW YORK 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XV 



JULY, 1919 
"o" 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD) 



NUMBER 4 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 

Mr. Aldo Leopold has written a story 
about an imaginary controversy. It 
gives us pleasure, Mr. Leopold, to read 
what you say about the "more game 
and fewer game law" question which 
seems to have attracted the attention of 
all of the sportsmen and naturalists in 
America. .You write so well that we 
are sure our readers, who may not agree 
with some of your ideas of democracy, 
will be interested in reading what you 
say. 

All will agree with you that "there 
has been a general and growing scar- 
city of game all over the United States, 
that the decrease has not been checked 
so far as upland game is concerned ; that 
the annual' drain on the game supply 
will greatly increase after the war." 

This is true not only in the United 
States but also in Canada where most of 
the wild ducks we shoot are bred. Hun- 
dreds of thousands of gunners have not 
been shooting in Canada for some years 
and this may have helped the migratory 
law some, as the stopping of spring 
shooting in our Northern States, by State 
enactments, undoubtedly did. Since the 
result of our numerous laws has not 
been to save the quail and grouse shoot- 
ing (we know they were given a fair 
trial in our native State a score of years 
.ago when we executed the laws more 
effectively than they have been executed 
anywhere) it is evident that there is 
something the matter. 

We are glad you observe that the 
words "more game and fewer game 
laws" started something. There is, as 
you say, a "nation-wide determination 
that something must be done." In fact, 
something is being done. 



Should Be No Controversy. 

As to your imaginary controversy the 
game farmers are too busy to engage in 
any controversy. When we read the 
statement that "our enemies are publish- 
ing a monthly magazine," we made some 
playful remarks about the singularity of 
any one being the enemy of common 
sense but our readers never were much 
interested and we are quite sure no one 
ever took the matter seriously. 

There is plenty of room in America to 
hunt with the camera and there will be 
more game to snapshoot when America 
becomes the biggest game producing 
country in the world. 

Col. Wallace well said that you erred 
in stating there is any antagonism be- 
tween the two propositions, one is a 
direct corollary to the other. 

As Col. Wallace said, all the farms 
are closed to free shooting in his State. 

Shooting on Farms. 

Most of the farms in all of the States 
are posted. No good reason can be as- 
signed why the owners of the farms 
should not profitably breed any species 
of plant or animal if they wish to do so. 
No good reason can be assigned why 
sporting game breeders should not keep 
the game abundant on some of the posted 
farms if they wish to do so. As a mat- 
ter of fact thousands are doing so. 
When it becomes legal to sell all species 
of game as food many men of moderate 
means can get shooting on these posted 
farms by combining to share the ex- 
pense oi looking after the game pro- 
perly. Our advice to the sportsmen is 
that they form shooting clubs or syndi- 
cates as they say in England and go 



102 



THE GAME BREEDER 



after some of this closed shooting. Open 
it up and speed it up is our motto. We 
are pleased to observe that many, sports- 
men are taking our advice. 

The sportsmen who open up the posted 
farms leave the free shooting on public 
lands and waters for those who are not 
industrious in the matter of game sav- 
ing. A noisy game refuge is more bene- 
ficial than a quiet refuge, but there is 
room enough for both. 

Sporting Breeders. 

Mr. Leopold in discussing his contro- 
versy overlooks the fact that there are 
thousands of game breeders who are 
sportsmen and who deal with the game 
farmers when they need stock birds to 
start some good shooting. It may inter- 
est him to know that probably there are 
oiver an hundred (thousand; sportsmen 
who have excellent shooting every sea- 
son. The country is so big that we can 
readily see how he overlooked them. 

We fail to see why he should suggest 
that game farmers are "cranks." They 
.go about their business in an indus- 
trious manner and he may be interested 
to know that a number of them will 
take an order for 50,000 game eggs if 
any one wants as many at one time. 
We know of a large number whose out- 
put will be over 25,000 next spring. 
There is nothing cranky about any of 
these people or about many thousands of 
others in the game breeding industry in 
a smaller way. The shooting game 
breeders who deal with the game far- 
mers are a solendid lot of sportsmen of 
all grades of wealth (some only pay $15 
a year for their shooting) . There is not 
a crank in the lot ; but of course he did 
not refer to these since he only men- 
tioned the game farmers. We represent 
all of these people and know them and 
their splendid industry well. 

His review of a controversy is a re- 
view of something which we are sure 
does not exist. It takes two to make a 
controversy and the game farmers are 
not opposed to people who wish to hunt 
only with a camera and "to preserve," 
as he says, "at least a sample of all wild 
life." The game farmers are actively 
engaged in saving a very big sample of 



all species of game. They have to their 
credit: (1) The saving of the bison or 
buffalo. They have sold a lot of these 
animals to zoological gardens. They 
have sold a big herd of bison to Canada 
because the U. S. market seemed to be 
oversupplied. They will take an order 
for a carload lot of bison or more at 
any time if he will find a place to estab- 
lish some "free shooting" at these ani- 
mals. 

(2) The game breeders have saved 
the antelope which rapidly were vanish- 
ing and the State game officer of Mr. 
Leopold's State says in the last last an- 
nual report that a game breeder or game 
farmer owns the largest herd of antelope 
in existence (under a liberal game breed- 
ers' law). Any one who wishes "a sam- 
ple of wild life" can procure it by apply-, 
ing to the proper game breeder. See ad- 
vertisements in The Game Breeder. 

(3) In States which have liberal game 
breeders' laws the game breeders have 
saved the quail and keep these birds so 
abundant that it is safe to shoot large 
numbers every year. The owners of the 
quail are generous and will sell or even 
give away quail where the laws permit 
them to do so. The Game Conservation 
Society has given away quail of several 
species to people who wrote common 
sense articles describing how they saved 
the game. 

(4) The game breeders have saved 
large numbers of prairie grouse, sharp- 
tailed grouse and ruffed grouse. They 
will sell some of -their birds and give 
some away as soon as the shipping facili- 
ties are free and it becomes legal to make 
these birds plentiful as it now is to make 
pheasants plentiful. 

(5) The game breeders already have 
made the United States the biggest 
pheasant producing country in the world. 
There are more pheasants in the United 
States than there are in China where the 
breeding stock for pheasants was pro- 
cured, both for England and the United 
States. A little reading notice in The 
Game Breeder stating that the game 
warden of Pennsylvania wanted pheas- 
ant eggs brought him several thousand 
eggs late in the season after many hun- 
dreds of thousands had been sold. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



103 



.(6) The game breeders have made the 
mallard ducks abundant in many places. 
Hundreds of thousands of these birds 
and their eggs will be offered for sale 
and many have been sold (see advertise- 
ments in The Game Breeder). The game 
breeders purchased many wood duck in 
Belgium, prior to the war, and they now 
own thousands of these birds. The Bel- 
gians had no wood ducks until they pro- 
cured their breeding stock in America. 
The reason mallards are more abund- 
ant than other wild fowl is that in some 
States it is criminal to profitably pro- 
duce teal and other fowl. The mallard 
is, also, a little easier to handle. But for 
this reason the laws should encourage 
and not prevent the production of the 
more difficult species. 

(7) The game breeders have saved 
the wild turkey and have introduced it 
in States where it had ceased to exist. 
There are many quail "shoots" where 
wild turkeys commonly are shot by the 
quail shooters. The sportsmen as a rule 
do not own the farms where the shoot- 
ing is done. They simply pay a few 
icents per acre annually for the right to 
go behind the signs prohibiting trespass 
and to literally shoot the wild life into 
great abundance, paradoxical as the 
statement may seem. The shooting is 
the inducement to keep the game abund- 
ant. The quail of course eat more po- 
tato bugs, boll weavels, and others when 
quail are abundant than they do when 
quail are scarce. The quail and turkeys 
are bred wild in the fields and woods and 
there is a generous "sample of wild 
life" preserved where any one can get 
permission to hunt with a camera. The 
writer had no trouble in getting permis- 
sion to see the abundant game including 
wild turkeys nesting in fields when the 
farmers were plowing. Wild quail and 
wild turkeys (more abundant than we 
had ever seen them before) were "grati- 
fying to the eye and the soul" — to say 
nothing about eating. 

Game Farms and Game Breeders. 

Mr. MacVicar properly explained to 
Mr. Leopold the difference between the 
game farm and the game preserve. The 



game farmer usually owns his farm 
where he produces large numbers of 
game birds and game quadrupeds. He 
sells game and game eggs in big num- 
bers to the owners of country places, 
to shooting clubs and to the State game 
officers. 

Hundreds of thousands of birds and 
eggs have been sold by the American 
game farmers who advertise in The 
Game Breeder to the customers named. 
The industry is young in America but 
growing with great rapidity. 

Free Shooting. 

Mr. MacVicar makes another good 
statement : "Free shooting is very beau- 
tiful in theory, but where there is free 
shooting it usually means no shooting 
at all." How true this is of the farms 
posted by the farmers ! How true it is 
where they have secured laws putting 
the quail on the song bird list in order 
to see that those who have disregarded 
trespass signs have no excuse for so 
doing. 

Natural Enemies. 

Mr. Leopold says the game farmer is 
right in his ideas about vermin. Here 
again he sees that the "more game and 
fewer game laws" movement started 
something quite worth while. The word 
vermin was not used in our literature un-; 
til the game breeders began to discuss 
the damage to their game crops. State 
reports now contain statistics about the 
vermin killed on game farms. (See one 
in this issue.) 

Here it appears that the game farmers 
are by no means cranks. Their magazine 
is fully aware that vermin should not be 
indiscriminately destroyed. It agrees 
with the Audubon Association, the Bio- 
logical Survey and the naturalists that 
some game enemies are beneficial and 
that these only should be destroyed when 
they acquire perverted appetites and are 
harmful to the game. The question is 
one to be studied and the people who 
have game in abundance should be edu- 
cated to control only the harmful spe- 
cies, and that no great harm will follow 
the toleration of some of these. 



104 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Game Markets. 

As to game markets, the game owned 
and produced by industry should be sold 
of course under proper regulations. The 
Game Breeder often has said that game 
farmers and breeders will fare better if 
the sale of the game from public lands 
and waters be prohibited than they will 
if it be permitted. 

Mr. Leopold jumps at the conclusion 
that game farmers wish to have compe- 
tition. His erroneous ideas are based 
on the statement that in free countries 
the market gunners own the game they 
legally shoot and trap and they sell it 
as a matter of course. Here is a pro- 
vision for the impecunious sportsmen, 
Mr. Leopold, which enables them to pur- 
chase ammunition and have a good time. 
We have mentioned the matter simply 
to illustrate the mistaken ideas of those 
who try to arouse the people to go in 
strongly for more laws by assuring them 
that only dukes and lords shoot in Eng- 
land. There are many shooting syndi- 
cates formed to share the expense of 
keeping up some sport. We agree that 
it is wise to confine the sale of game in 
America to game produced by industry, 
because the sale of public game would 
undoubtedly result in too much being 
shot, at least until game becomes very 
abundant. There is no controversy here. 
Mr. Leopold simply misunderstands why 
we mentioned the freedom of the poor 
in the free countries. We can see why 
they should give way in America until 
game is more abundant just as we see 
why the quail should go on the song 
bird list. We never have been able to 
see any moral turpitude in a poor man's 
living out on the beach and supporting 
his family by taking fish from the waters 
and fowl from the air. We have put 
in some time shooting with these indus- 
trious people and it has always seemed 
to us when we observed their healthy, 
happy children, that they were better off 
than they would be in a crowded' tene- 
ment in the city. In countries where 
game is properly looked after they can 
sell the food they secure to the people 
at absurdly low prices. Sportsmen who 
own country homes and sportsmen who 



rent shooting on the posted farms see 
no more objection to market gunners 
than they see to market fishermen. 

Much as we sympathize with and ap- 
prove of the conduct of the good old 
gunners who formerly sent game to the 
markets we can see that this was as 
much overdone as the quail shooting was 
and that excepting in places where game 
is produced both the sporting- vocation 
of the wild fowler and the shooting of 
quail for fun will not be permitted. 

M. G. or F. G. That's the Question! 

We have tried the sport of getting 
more game laws and in fact worked hard 
at it some years ago. We find the in- 
dustry of producing more game far more 
interesting and there can be no doubt 
that we have increased our opportunity 
for good bags of quail and other game. 
Since the food procured goes a long way 
towards offsetting the cost of production 
we have ascertained that anyone can 
have excellent shooting during a long 
open season if he wants to. We know . ' 
some people who frankly say there is 
more money in the game law industry 
and who point with pride to their lead- 
ers who take in a surprising amount of 
coin. All we ask is if we do not inter- 
fere with this money-making game that 
the money-makers be not permitted to 
prevent the breeding of game on game 
farms and shooting grounds where our 
game shooters have a big lot of sport 
every season and where game farmers 
produce game birds and eggs profitably. 
We like the shooting and we are glad it 
is coming back everywhere in the free 
states. 

Game Wanted 

If you want any game or game eggs 
by all means put in a small advertisement 
stating just what you want. If our ad- 
vertisers can not furnish it you, no doubt, 
will hear from those who can. 

Those who have not tried an adver- 
aisement in The Game Breeder should 
do so. They will get in touch with the 
best customers in the countrv. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



106 



MENTAL RECREATION IN GAME BREEDING. 



By G. H. Corsan. 



Game breeding is such a fascinating 
hobby that in a very few years the few 
thousands now engaged in it will grow 
to many thousands. It is an expensive 
hobby if one wishes to go into it sud- 
denly, but entered by degrees it can 
readily be made a wonderfully good pay- 
ing business. It pays a person if they 
get pleasure out of it even if they don't 
make money out of it. I am sure that 
the Great Geometrician of the universe 
must endorse the plan of the game breed- 
ers to restock this continent with beau- 
tiful utility birds. 

But skunks come around and the great 
horned owl and the mink and weasel 
have to be fought. Very well, they are 
far from discouraging to me. I love to 
fight and I love to kill injurious crea- 
tures ; and I trap and I shoot and I 
poison and I use my brains to destroy 
the enemies of the game farm. 

The great horned owl has killed pigs 
twice to my knowledge and a full grown 
mute swan once and I have set my hand 
against it, and I trap it on posts by 
erecting the head and neck of a guinea 
fowl with wire, then nailing the wings 
on each side of the post and the tail 
behind, on the top of the post and in the 
center lies the jump trap; then good-by 
Mr. Great Horned Owl. 

But should the varmint kill, then the 
traps lie around the kill to the number 
of eight and he may snap seven but the 
eighth has him fast. And stake the 
traps down well for he has tremendous 
strength, as any bird must have that can 
kill a full grown house cat or skunk. 
The first night the owl pulls off the 
head and neck of the toughest kind of 
a bird and swallows it whole. Then he 
pulls out the entrails from the breast 
and devours them. The next night he 
visits the kill to have a second feast. So 
tie the kill to the ground tightly, unless 
you want to eat the kill yourself, then 
leave legs, wings, feathers and tail in 
the very same spot. Cover feathers 



lightly over the traps. He is a stupid 
bird and will be there in the morning 
spitting and looking like a real hun. 

You may also go out to the nearby 
pine and hemlock woods and find him 
at roost by day but on the lookout and 
quite well able to see. And he also 
hunts by day and can kill a bird that 
is not tough in an extraordinary short 
time. 

This bird in the photograph killed my 
blue, snow and black brant geese leaving 
me the ganders. But the Canada gan- 
ders will fight him and he leaves them 
alone. As watch dogs and alarm clocks 
they take the place of the guinea fowl at 
night time. 

Snow geese are being bred now and 
I feel that it is up to me to breed blue 
geese and whistler swans. But first get 
.the birds. Secondly have a suitable 
place. Third use judgment and don't 
overfeed the birds as they are fed at the 
zoos, nor crowd them up too much. 

Tennis and golf, etc., may have their 
valuable side for drawing a man's mind 
off business and family worries, but they 
are not to be at all compared to the 
power that lies in game breeding. The 
fresh air, the exercise and the mental 
satisfaction of accomplishing something 
not only difficult but rare. 

One day a few years ago I was motor- 
ing in Northern Indiana and Southern 
Michigan when I saw a very beautiful, 
tall young woman as straight as an 
Indian. I stopped the machine and I 
watched her — for I knew that she was 
someone unusual. I did not have long 
to stop before I heard a wonderful clear 
voice call out, "Birdie!" "Birdie!" 
"B-irdie!" Then what should appear 
free, and from all kinds of cover? 
Scores of most beautiful pheasants of 
some dozen varieties as well as pea- 
fowl. 

We — for we were a machine full — 
jumped out and walked over and had a 
long talk with Miss Helen Bartlett. 



106 



THE GAME BREEDER 



That was indeed a day of joy to us 
all. I am writing from Baltimore and 
this June Sunday I intend to take a run 
over and see how that pair of trumpeter 
swans are doing in the National Park 
Zoo. 

The dog "Togo" in the picture, I send 
is a white Boston bullterrier and as 
good natured an animal as lives. But 
he infernally hates skunks and keeps his 
master's poultry farm absolutely free 
from them, as he never fails to make a 
kill when the overconfident skunk comes 



around to Mr. Eugene Sites' poultry 
farm at Elyria, Ohio. He has "Togo" 
to deal with. "Togo" always digs him- 
self into the damp ground under the barn 
after each encounter and stays there 
without eating for two or three days. 
May his kind increase, is my wish, and 
I guess that the reader will say amen! 
The National Park Zoo has lost their 
female trumpeter swan and now they 
are looking for another bird as the male 
wants to mate. 



MORE ABOUT GAME ENEMIES. 

From the Report of the Massachusetts Commissioners on Fish and Game. 



Each year furnishes, despite the ut- 
most watchfulness on the part of the 
superintendents, new evidence of the 
depredations of hawks, owls and other 
enemies on the stock under their care. 
In the quail breeding work, even though 
the birds are kept in wire covered en- 
closures, they are not safe from the at- 
tacks of hawks and owls, for when 
frightened the birds have a natural in- 
stinct to fly upwards to escape, and in 
doing so thrust their heads through the 
openings at the top of the enclosure, only 
to have them bitten off. 

At the Sandwich Bird Farm a sys- 
tematic trapping of destructive birds was 
carried on as usual, and also of the rats 
which concentrate about the feeding 
places in the duck yards. Foxes occa- 
sionally give trouble, though not to the 
extent that the birds do. At this station 
the score was 368 for the year ending 
Nov. 30, 1918, as follows: 

One long-eared owl, 5 great horned 
owls, 1 short-eared owl, 2 red-tailed hen 
hawks, 3 red-shouldered hawks, 6 
goshawks, 15 Cooper's hawks, 2 screech 
owls, 5 sharp-skinned hawks, 2 pigeon 
hawks, 4 sparrow hawks, 8 marsh hawks, 
1 rough-legged hawk, 260 rats, 16 
weasels, 3 foxes, 6 skunks, 10 black- 
snakes, 18 snapping turtles. 



The record at the Wilbraham Game 
Farm was not kept as accurately as in 
other years, but among the vermin de- 
stroyed were : 

Sixteen skunks, 30 rats, 5 snakes, 9 
hawks, 3 owls, 4 cats. In addition to 
those taken by hawks, 131 young birds 
are known to have been taken here by 
other enemies. This year crows have 
been more of a nuisance at this station 
than hawks, and it was almost impossible 
to get within gunshot of them. The 
boxes containing young birds were closed 
each night against cats and skunks, but 
on one occasion skunks gained an en- 
trance by digging under the boxes and 
killed forty pheasants in one night. 

At the Marshfield Bird Farm the 
snapping turtles, are found to be one of 
the worst pests. As they bury deep in 
the mud about the only remedy is to 
board the entire edge of the pond around 
and to probe all over to kill them. 

Numbers of great horned owls were 
about this season. One gained entrance 
to the brood house one night by break- 
ing through a pane of glass, and by. 
morning he had killed fifteen ducks. 
After that pole traps were put out and 
several owls taken by this means. Crows 
added to the losses by taking both eggs- 
and ducklings. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



107 



A Hawk Takes a Trout. 

Not only the game farms but the fish 
hatcheries as well suffer from the activ- 
ities of predatory birds which are re- 
sponsible for the loss of substantial num- 
bers of fish every year. At the Sand- 
wich Fish Hatchery last February one 
of the workmen noticed a red-shouldered 
hawk on the bank of the brook. He 
succeeded in killing it, and found it held 
in its talons a live, perfectly healthy fe- 
male brook trout 13 inches long, weigh- 
ing 13 ounces. As the legs and the 
underpart of the hawk were wet, un- 
questionably the bird had gone into the 



water after the fish. In the superin- 
tendent's fourteen years' experience this 
is the first instance that has come to his 
attention of any species of hawk going 
into the water after fish, excepting the 
fish hawk. The bird measured 3 feet 6 
inches from tip to tip, and 19 inches 
from beak to tip of the tail. It had been 
seen around the hatchery for several 
weeks, and up to that time had evaded 
capture. 

In another instance a black crown 
night heron which had been shot at this 
station was found to contain ninety-two 
2-inch and 3-inch brook trout fingerlings. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Trapping Quail. 

A plan for trapping quail for breeding 
purposes is described in the report of 
the 'Massachusetts Commissioners. The 
superintendent of the Marshfield Bird 
Farm was detailed to do the trapping. 
He began work January 11, at which 
time the weather was extremely cold and 
the ground covered with ice. The first 
steps in the work were to locate the 
quail; to select the desirable places to 
set the traps ; and, finally, to bring the 
quail to the place. The latter end was 
accomplished by placing grain at the 
trapping places selected, so as to accus- 
tom the birds to come to the spot. 

Six traps designed for this work were 
put out. They were shaped like a scal- 
lop shell, covered with linen thread net 
and set on figure four spindles. When 
set on the ground they resembled an 
umbrella with the handle cut off. The 
traps were visited twice daily, morning 
and night, the last visit about dusk. Thus 
no birds remained in the traps any length 
of time, and (with the exception of one 
taken by a cat) none died in the traps. 
When a snowstorm threatened the traps 
were taken up so that none might be 
caught and perish. 

The heavy snows, the winds that blew 
down the traps, and more especially the 



small birds and animals which would 
get in and spring the traps necessitated 
many fruitless sets and trips before the 
quota (50 quail) was secured. Many 
and many a time traps were inspected 
only to find that they had been sprung 
by the small swamp birds, and sometimes 
the quail were seen running around the 
outside of the trap ready to go in had it 
not already been sprung. In some locali- 
ties these small birds were so trouble- 
some that it was necessary to abandon 
operations on that spot. Rabbits and 
squirrels added to the difficulties by dam- 
aging the nets gnawing their way out, 
making it necessary to mend the holes 
on the spot with the temperature at zero. 

A trap 8 feet by 18 inches by 18 inches 
covered with wire netting, working on 
the same principle as a rat trap that 
would catch as many as would go in, 
was also used and found convenient for 
picking up the odd birds in flocks after 
the larger portion had been caught. 
Each lot of birds caught was immediately 
placed in a stall in the brood house fur- 
nished with cedar trees, large box of 
dusting sand, straw covered floor, char- 
coal, oyster shells, water and feed. 
Forty-four birds were trapped and kept 
at the game farm from the middle of 
January to August 10. They submitted 



108 



THE GAME BREEDER 



to confinement readily and lost their first 
wildness in a short time, though they 
retained their instinct to hide. It was 
a pretty sight to see the birds running 
about in the straw, under the dry ce- 
dars, and dusting in the sand in the sun- 
light on a cold day when snow was 
heaped high outside the brood house. 

Quail Breeding at Marshfield. 

The quail trapped by the Massachu- 
setts Commission were placed in breed- 
ing pens at the Marshfield Bird Farm. 
The following description of the breed- 
ing experiment is from the excellent re- 
port of the Fish and Game Commission. 
The breeding pens were located in a 5- 
acre piece of natural quail cover. The 
brook separated it from the game farm, 
and a locked gate kept visitors out, as 
the birds must be undisturbed during 
the breeding season. The pens were 8 
feet square made of one inch mesh wire 
netting, frame painted. Tarred paper 
on north and east sides kept out the 
winds, and a bundle of straw arranged 
in this corner formed a natural hiding 
place and shelter from the rains and 
cold. The tops were covered to keep out 
vermin. The pens were located on 
grassy spots, and each contained a bunch 
of growing bayberry bushes for cover 
and feed. An old stump was provided 
also, as the cock quail likes to stand on 
this and whistle. The hen bird likes 
to build her nest in the old grass, leav- 
ing so small an entrance to the nest as to 
make it difficult to discover even on 
close inspection. This is as natural a 
sort of cover as can be gotten for quail. 
Each pen contained finely ground oyster 
shells, charcoal and sand, and was sup- 
plied with fresh feed and drinking water 
every day by the superintendent. No 
one was allowed near the pens. When 
the quarters were ready the birds were 
paired. A cock'bird caught on the land 
of A would be mated with a hen bird 
from the land of B, 10 miles away. (The 
birds were marked with different colored 
celluloid rings indicating the land where 
taken.) There were twenty pens with 
a pair of birds in each. The pens were 



numbered, and as the eggs were taken 
out they were marked with the pen num- 
ber. This was done to keep track of the 
fertility. 

With the quail in the yards the war 
with vermin began. A close watch was 
maintained at all times and traps set, 
and as a result of constant care no birds 
were lost from this cause. 

As fast as enough eggs for a setting 
were secured they were placed under 
bantams for incubation. The total laid 
was 384 of which 131 were infertile. 

Laying proceeded from May 15 to 
August 10, when 42 of the 44 trapped 
birds were liberated. At the time all 
were laying and the chances are that 
most of them made nests in the open, as 
several flocks of young birds have been 
seen in the localities where they were 
freed. Four lots of six adult quail each 
were distributed to owners of land from 
which quail had been taken ; the re- 
mainder of the trapped birds were turned 
loose in the Marshfield Reservation. 

Of the 384 eggs collected 253 hatched. 
Thirty-four of the young birds escaped, 
112 were lost in the course of rearing, 
and 107 reached the age for liberation. 
Some of these were liberated on land 
where birds had been trapped in the 
spring, and where the cover was partic- 
ularly suitable, and others were sent out 
as part of our general distribution. In 
three cases the hen built two nests and 
laid in each, which fact was not known 
until the superintendent discovered the 
young from the stolen nests, which had 
been incubated by the cocks. The broods 
consisted of 13, 9 and 4. respectively. 
In one case the chicks were not discov- 
ered until they were so far advanced 
that the tail feathers had started. Each 
pair of quail and the chicks were imme- 
diately liberated, and the station has 
taken no credit for the rearing of these 
birds, counting them as though hatched 
in the wild. 



Wood Pigeons. 

The wood pigeons are so abundant in 
England that they are said to be a nuis- 
ance. Now that the shipping facilities 



THE GAME BREEDER 



109 



are again good for foreign game birds 
it might be a good plan to import a few 
thousand pigeons and give them a trial. 
We suggest to the importers that the 
numerous game breeding associations 
and game shooting clubs affiliated with 
the Game Conservation Society are in a 
mood to buy any targets wearing feath- 
ers, provided, of course, they be edible, 
and the wood pigeon is said to be very 
good to eat. 

There is no law against shooting and 
eating wood pigeons and it would be 
interesting to see if these birds rapidly 
would become abundant on the club 
grounds and would fly all over the coun- 
try to be shot by an admiring populace. 

We doubt if a few birds liberated in 
one place would escape our numerous 
hawks, cats, et al., but some of a good 
lot of birds might pull through and 
become established. Any club which 
acquires these birds will, of course, not 
shoot them all the first season, and it 
seems likely if they thrive at all they 
will thrive abundantly. 

If some of our enterprising importers 
will bring over a lot of wood pigeons we 
will boom the product with some reading 
notices and we know it is easy for us to 
make game birds fashionable. 

All the blue quail offered for sale 
last season were sold although no one 
yet knows if they can be introduced in 
the North successfully. 

Send in a reading notice if you import 
any wood pigeons and we will put it in 
free. We think more about making 
America a big game producing country 
than we do about making money. 

If our readers who would like to try 
wood pigeons will write to our larger 
advertisers who import birds they, no 
doubt, will get the pigeons. 



More Gray Partridges. 

We can announce on good authority 
that good big importations of gray part- 
ridges (often called Hungarians in 
America although they are abundant in 
England and also in other continental 
countries besides Hungary) soon will be 
coming this way. Readers who want the 



so-called Hungarians can get their check 
books ready. They soon can send money 
to the importers with the assurance that 
they will get the birds. As usual we 
can forecast coming events in the game 
bird industry. 

Advice to State Game Officers. 

State ganie officers who wish to pur- 
chase job lots of Hungarians would do 
well to write to the Game Conservation 
Society and get some good advice about 
how to turn these birds down success- 
fully so they will become established. 
Heretofore thousands of dollars have 
been expended to feed vermin with the 
innocent imported birds. We can plan 
the introduction so that it will probably 
be successful and there are vast tracts 
of land in America where public shoot- 
ing is perfectly proper and where it 
should not be necessary to rely on the 
prohibition of field sports for terms of 
years to insure some good partridge 
shooting. — ,, _„,>** 

In Connecticut where an attempt was 
made to introduce some thousands of 
dollars worth of Hungarians by turning- 
down a few pair of birds here and there,, 
a game warden reported that a hawk 
took one of a pair of birds he liberated, 
before he left the field. There is a way 
of turning down partridges which we 
feel sure will be successful. Game offi- 
cers who are subscribers can get some 
good advice if they will let us know 
when they get the partridges. 

Our Best Game Bird. 

English gamekeepers who have made 
our American quail, the bobwhite, 
abundant and who keep it so in places 
where big bags of quail are shot every 
season, say that bobwhite is the best 
game bird in the world. Often they 
have referred to the way our quail per- 
forms before dogs. It will be an easy 
matter for some inexpensive quail clubs, 
or syndicates as they say in England, 
to restore quail shooting in Ohio and 
other prohibition states on many of the 
posted farms. All that is necessary is to 



110 



THE GAME BREEDER 



. ,1 



rent the shooting for a few cents per 
acre and to look after the birds properly 
— which means to employ a beat keeper 
to control the hawks, crows and other 
vermin, and to see that the quail have 
some covers and suitable nesting places 
and an abundance of food. The Game 
Conservation Society often is consulted 
about the formation of new clubs, the 
cost, etc. There should be no possible 
objection to sportsmen combining in 
order to have excellent shooting on the 
posted farms in the prohibition States. 
The farmers quickly will join them and 
aid in having the law amended so that 
quail can be bred in good numbers and 
shot during a long open season. When 
it is desired to keep the annual dues 
down, so that anyone can shoot, some 
of the abundant quail should be sold to 
help pay the shooting rent and the wages 
of the keeper. It is absolutely necessary 
to control the hawks, crows, cats, snakes 
and many other enemies of the game in 
order to keep it abundant to see that it 
does not again go on the song bird list 
when the shooting is lively. When the 
natural enemies of the game eat birds 
and eggs in large numbers it is not safe 
to do any shooting because the birds 
shot are always the stock birds left by 
vermin for breeders. 
*" It is highly desirable to shoot quail 
in October when the weather is fine and 
it is a pleasure to be out of doors. Sen- 
sible game breeders' laws permit those 
who look after their game to shoot dur- 
ing long open seasons and they, of 
course, fix their own bag limits, always 
large, so as to leave some breeding stock 
on the ground. 

Don't be afraid of anyone calling you 
a duke or lord if you provide some good 
quail shooting at say $25 per year. 

More About Wood Pigeons. 

Owen Jones says wood pigeons are the 
wild fowl of waterless districts. I have 
had my share of sport with wood pigeons 
if I never have any more; also I have 
missed my share of pigeons. The man 
who can hit wood pigeons can hit any- 
thing that flies. Not every man who 



has killed a brace from a covey of driven 
partridges so that both birds have fallen 
to the ground in front of him — to ac- 
complish the feat at the expense of wood 
pigeons coming straight is not so simple 
as it seems. I never did it with part- 
ridges but managed it with wood pigeons 
once and once only. I came within an 
ace of doing it a second time during 
the last days in my keeper's berth but 
the second bird fell, as it were, "on the 
line." However, to serve a double at 
wood pigeons, brings in my experience 
of shooting as much satisfaction as any- 
thing, no matter how or where the birds 
fall. There is nothing like wood pigeon 
shooting for teaching a man how to take 
birds coming to him, and the habit of 
aiming well forward, which is the key- 
note of good work. * * * I have 
lost several chances to d© great things 
through shortage of cartridges. The 
best of pigeon shooting is that it lasts 
almost the year round, and that without 
bringing about even a desirable decrease 
in the number of birds. — Ten Years of 
Gamekeeping. 

Partridges and Foxes. 

Owen Jones says, "Partridge shoot- 
ing, if only because it is cheap, is bound 
to remain the most popular form of 
shooting; and since less can.be done to 
prevent, or to make good, the damage 
by foxes to partridges than to other 
game, foxes must give way to par- 
tridges." 

Our American quail or partridge un- 
doubtedly can be handled as cheaply as 
the gray partridges are and quail shoot- 
ing (even in the prohibition States where 
the bird is on the song bird list for a 
term of years or forever) undoubtedly 
will become the most popular form of 
sport not only because it will be cheap 
but because the quail is our best game 
bird. 

Mexican Bobwhites. 

Experiments were made last year with 
Mexican quail by the Massachusetts 
Commission and the Sandwich and 
Marshfield Bird Farms. The following 



THE GAME BREEDER 



111 



reports of the work are from the fifty- 
third annual report of the commis- 
sioners : 

The Sandwich Bird Farm. — In order 
to make a practical test of the feasibility 
of buying quail in the market for stock- 
ing the covers rather than to rear our 
own stock, a trial order was placed for 
120 Mexican bobwhites to be sent from 
Eagle Pass, Texas, price to be $2 each, 
only live birds to be paid for. They 
were shipped by express April 16 and 
arrived at East Sandwich late in the 
afternoon of the 23d, having been on the 
road the greater part oif eight days. 
Thirty-eight were dead on arrival, the 
remaining 82 very weak. They were im- 
mediately put into roomy quarters in a 
favorable location, lightly fed and wa- 
tered, but in a few days 43 more had 
died. The shipping crates seemed large 
enough for the dozen birds that were in 
each, and there was plenty of air, grit 
and feed and a chance for water ; but 
the kind of feed seemed entirely wrong, 
being mostly ordinary cracked corn with 
very little kaffir corn. The remaining 
birds were held until May 22. when two 
lots of 8 each were sent for liberation in 
Reading and Gloucester, 8 to the bird 
farm at Marsh.fi eld, and the remaining 
15 placed in breeding quarters. 

The first egg was laid on June 5 at 
which time 12 breeding birds remained. 
One hen laid 7 eggs and died, leaving 
11 birds, one of which died the latter 
part of July. The last eggs were picked 
up August 26, at which time but 7 of 
the birds remained alive. On October 
1 the last six remaining were released 
on the grounds, hoping thereby to save 
them for experiments next season. Total 
eggs, laid was 107, which, "as nearly as 
can be reckoned, considering the deaths 
during the laying season, compared 
favorably with the record of the native 
quail. Of the 107 eggs laid 45 were 
distributed to applicants. The remaining 
62 were set under bantams and .43 
hatched, their being 11 infertile ones 
and five which contained dead germs. 
This gave a fertility of about 82 per 
cent, and a hatching per cent of 69. 



Fourteen young were raised, but one 
nice brood of 18 was lost by accident 
when a few days old, but for which un- 
doubtedly as good a percentage would 
have been attained as with the native 
quail. Both old and young birds had 
practically the same conditions and feed 
as the native birds. The young were 
retained at the hatchery, none being 
distributed. The old birds took well to 
confinement, though they appeared to be 
more nervous when anyone was about 
the coops, jumping about instead of hid- 
ing as the native birds are inclined to do. 
They have the same calls and the bob- 
white whistle, are slightly smaller in size, 
not so much of a whir to their wings 
when starting, and have a distinct gray- 
ish cast to their whole plumage instead 
of jthei more brownlish of the native 
birds. This effect is readily noticed as 
a flock starts in the open. 

The Marshfield Bird Farm. — On May 
28 eight Mexican bobwhite quail were 
received from the Sandwich Bird Farm. 
In a few days two of them had died. 
The remainder after being kept for a 
while, began to lay a few eggs and they 
were hatched out with the others. The 
young which hatched did not seem to 
have the vitality of the native stock and 
only a few reached maturity and were 
released with the rest of the young from 
here. They received the same care as 
was given the native stock but did not 
seem to thrive well in this climate. The 
six adult birds were released with the 
rest of the native brood stock. 



Swinehoes. 

Game Breeder: 

Dear Sirs — Can you tell me what 
young Swinehoe pheasants should be 
fed on? I have been very successful in 
raising young Golden and Amherst 
pheasants (sometimes I have raised 
every one hatched out of a setting) but 
I have failed entirely on the Swinehoe. 
Some of the young Swinehoe lived two 
weeks, and would eat a meal worm oc- 
casionally, also some bread soaked in 
milk, but I could see I did not have the 



112 



THE GAME BREEDER 



right food' for them. Please tell me 
what food is required for them. 
Yours truly, 
Delaware. Walter J. Willis. 

[We have had no experience with Swine- 
hoes. We suggest that you write to our 
advertisers and ask if any special food is 
required. Wc cannot think so. The birds 
are pheasants and it seems to us that they 
should be fed as other aviary species are. 
When we don't know anything we simply say 
so and tell readers where to get the best 
advice. Our advertisers certainlv are success- 
ful—Editor.] 

More Eggs. 

One of our readers says, "I have not 
had time to write as I should. I have 
just sold 1,500 ringneck eggs by tele- 
gram. I sold another order of 1,500 and 
numerous small orders for 800 eggs ; and 
I have set 2,500' myself. Next year I 
shall have about three times as many." 
Who says the Hercules Powder Com- 
pany has not promoted the sale of cart- 
ridges ? 

We are always glad to hear from 
readers. We seem to have mislaid a 
note from one who says he will have 
50,000 eggs. We are a little curious to 
know which one of our readers produced 
the most eggs. We have several records 
of 25,000 and more and the best part 
of it is all of them sold all they wished 
to sell, being 'determined to have much 
larger breeding stocks next year than 
they had this season. Who says our 
dream about making America a big game 
producing country is not coming true ? 

More Crows. 

A New England reader writes : "I 
found two nests with 11 and 12 eggs re- 
spectively completely, cleaned out this 
a. m. by the crows. There is a big 
colony of them right off my enclosure 
and in an untenanted corner of a neigh- 
boring farm. Surely they are hard to 
deal with for although the "22" is work- 
ing overtime to a very good purpose and 
I have a few carcasses hung- up for all 
to see as well as some poisoned eggs 
left out in the swamp, they are so bold 
they will rob the nests in spite of all." 



Remedial. 

Try a Sauter decoy owl (see adver- 
tisement) and a Remington automatic 
scatter gun (see advertisement). We 
think it likely some of your neighbors 
will join and enjoy the "free shooting" 
at crows. You can help make them good 
soldiers for future wars although we 
hope there will be no more wars. 

Pheasants and Pigs. 

A reader says : "The second night 
after the keeper had placed the pheasant 
coops in the held with the 167 pheasants 
in them, some pigs which I keep broke 
down the fence which separated them 
from the pheasant field and killed 147 
of the young birds. 

"Only 75 duck 'were hatched from 
200 eggs and a proportion of 37y 2 per 
cent of fertile eggs is rather less than 
it should be." 

Among the discouraging records 
which come from new places this is the 
first pig record. The pig is a dangerous 
animal. A little girl who wandered from 
the yard into a field where there were 
pigs was killed and partly devoured by 
the animals. A setter, which belonged 
to a friend of ours, who shot on the 
farm, made frantic efforts to induce the 
mother of the child to come out of the 
house, but when she followed him to the 
field it was too late. A bulldog probably 
would have handled the matter differ- 
ently. 

More Silkies. 

Many game breeders use silkies and 
all say they make excellent foster 
mothers. There seems to be a big' de- 
mand for these birds. One of our read- 
ers who uses silkies writes : "Can you 
put me on trail of some more silkies?' 
In my estimation and in opposition to 
the opinion of Mr. Lee S. Crandall, who 
is quoted as saying, T am afraid the 
silky fowl is not very practicable as a 
foster mother because it is too small,' 
the silkies are better foster mothers than 
bantams, since they are very gentle, light 
and they can cover as many eggs as an 



THE GAME BREEDER 



113 



ordinary hen. I had 19 silkie eggs under 
one of these birds and she hatched 14 
eggs and reared the 14 chicks." 

More About Democracy. 

A Connecticut reader say "no doubt 
the remarks about a wide open market, 
etc., and the undemocratic, unsocial and 
therefore dangerous management of 
game met your eye." We read it all, and 
it amused us so much it occurred to us 
our readers should have it as they have 
in this issue. We are glad, especially 
glad to get all the hostile opinions we 
can. The sunlight of common sense 
shines so strongly now that there is no 
fear that trespass laws will be repealed. 
Since most of the farms are posted we 
can see no possible objection to indus- 
trious sportsmen opening them up for 
shooting, with their owners' consent. 
They will shoot where now there is no 
shooting ; they will leave the only free 
shooting there is at present for the ex- 
clusive use of the people who object to 
industry. If the sale of game be abso- 
lutely prohibited only people who can 
spend a lot of money can have the shoot- 
ing on the farms. If the sale of game 
be permitted the club dues can be small 
since the game will pay all or a good 
part of the exDenses of the sportsmen 
who have intelligence enough to know 
why shooting has been prohibited by law 
and by posting and how to put an end 
to the necessary prohibition of field 
sports. 

If it is democratic to arrest men, 
women and children because they pro- 
duce food on the farms we are repub- 
licans If it is republican to arrest peo- 
ple for selling food produced by industry 
we are democrats. We are quite sure 
the majority of intelligent Americans 
have about the same political views. 

Putting in the Pep. 

Mr. C. A. Benson writes : "You fel- 
lows are the ones who are putting pep 
into the business and it's up to us fel- 
lows to help you along some. The Eu- 
ropean fracas all but demolished our 
game producing business from lack of 



help and feed. Should' any of you get 
away from home as far. as Oregon there 
is a little game farm there welcoming 
you. Let us know and we will chain 
the airedale." 

Aviary Species at Shooting Clubs. 

We are glad to observe that many of 
the game shooting clubs and preserve 
owners are taking our advice to rear a 
few aviary species as a side line. The 
Long Island Association decided to try 
the Reeves pheasants. We shall not be 
surprised to hear that a few of the long- 
tails have been shot for a thanksgiving 
dinner. If there should be enough of 
them we would favor teaching the peo- 
ple to eat them at the annual game din- 
ner of the society which is given to in- 
terest the people in the rare sport of 
game eating, warranted to be more in- 
teresting than a Pennsylvania campaign 
for six "dozen new game laws. 

We prefer most of all the preserve 
which looks least like a preserve. The 
place where the game introduced is per- 
mitted to breed wild in the fields and 
woods and where the shooting is done 
under the most natural conditions. 



It is not an easy matter to turn down 
game birds with the hope that they will 
become established and will breed and 
become abundant. 



State game officers as well as individ- 
uals know that the losses are large of- 
ten, because vermin of many species is 
abundant. 



We are by no means opposed to inten- 
sive artificial breeding both on the game 
farms and ranches and on the club shoots. 
On the last named a large number of 
guns can have good shooting on a com- 
paratively small area since the abundant 
game going out from the rearing fields 
and pens will be plentiful in the fields. 



Where many sportsmen (as many as 
the land can accommodate) arrange to 



114 



THE GAME BREEDER 



shoot on some of the farms now closed 
to sport, it must be evident that they 
leave the free shooting for those who 
are not industrious. 



Experience has proved over and over 
again that where the shooting is lively 
many birds go out and restock entire 
neighborhoods. The shoots or noisy 
refuges are far more beneficial than any 
quiet refuges are since far more game 
is produced on areas which are properly 
looked after than is produced on refuges 
where vermin checks the increase of the 
game. We have records of thousands of 
game birds being shot in a season in the 
vicinity of places where game was pro- 
duced abundantly. 

A Famous Booklet. 

Mr. Aldo Leopold says : 

"What are the Game Farmers?" Since the 
Hercules Powder Company started to adver- 
tise them two years ago, the country has had 
little opportunity to forget them. In general, 
the Game Farmers propose to supplement wild 
game with, or substitute for it, a supply pro- 
duced under artificially regulated conditions. 
Radical Game Farmers tend to regard restric- 
tive game laws as eventually hopeless and 
ineffective. 

The Hercules Powder Company, ob- 
serving that field sports rapidly were 
coming to an end, issued a little booklet 
suggesting methods for producing "more 
game." Modesty prevents us from pass- 
ing on the merits of the now famous 
booklet, excepting to say that it contains 
a common sense view of the subject. 

The booklet was read by the sports- 
men of America and was universally ap- 
proved. 

Hercules Powder Company Advertis- 
ing. 

An advertising department is intended 
to back up the selling department. The 
salesmen, no> doubt, reported no sales of 
cartridges possible for quail and grouse 
shooting in entire States. A manufac- 
turer of cartridges naturally would like 
to see something more than sentimental 
ramblers with the camera, and the Her- 
cules Powder Company, fully aware that 
there is plenty of room on the North 



American Continent for both field sports 
and sentimental ramblers, did a great 
public service in calling attention to the 
"more game and fewer game laws" idea. 

Already millions of game eggs and 
game birds of many species are pro- 
duced and the ratio of increase evidently 
is geometrical. If North America 
quickly becomes the greatest game coun- 
try in the world, as it surely will, the 
advertising campaign will be regarded as 
one of the biggest and most valuable ever 
undertaken. Game farmers only regard 
the game laws as hopeless and ineffec- 
tive when they interfere with and pre- 
vent or prohibit game breeding. All that 
they have ever asked was that they be 
not applied to their industry. 

In State laws which formerly said, 
"the State owns the game," we now 
often read, "excepting game privately 
owned and legally acquired," or words 
to that effect. See the New York 
statute for illustration. 

Before the game breeders consented to 
the enactment of the migratory bird law, 
which was highly preventive in its terms, 
the bill was amended so as to read that 
"nothing in the act shall be construed to 
prevent the breeding of game on game 
farms and preserves and the sale of the 
game so bred in order to increase our 
food supply." 

All of the people were represented in 
the Congress and it is fair to say that 
the people favored the more game idea 
advanced by The Game Breeder. There 
was some opposition. , A statement ap- 
pears in the Congressional Record "that 
we don't want any game preserves or the 
sale of game in America," but The Game 
Breeder was cited to illustrate the big 
industry now conducted in the country; 
the Audubon Society (which undoubt- 
edly is as much in favor of camera 
hunters and sentimental ramblers as we 
are) favored the amendment and it be- 
came the national law. Congressmen 
and Senators, we are told, expressed sur- 
prise that there should be any opposition 
to a food producing industry. Surprise 
also was expressed at the size of the 
industry and a request was made that 
the evidence displayed by advertisements 



THE GAME BREEDER 



115 



in The Game Breeder be made a part 
of the Congressional Record. 

The game breeders are heartily in 
favor of restrictive laws intended to save 
the game said to be owned by the State 
or Nation, but they are not in favor of 
applying the restrictions to game pro- 
duced by industry and owned by the pro- 
ducers. They are very friendly to the 
State game departments and all intelli- 
gent State officers are glad to see a big 
lot of game produced on the posted 
farms where no one could shoot. It is 
such areas that the game breeders seek 
to occupy. They are the most suitable 
for shooting. 

Grouse and Quail in Oregon. 

One of our Oregon readers writes, "I 
will not be able to get you any sharp- 
tailed grouse or eggs either. Grouse are 
becoming alarmingly scarce here, but a 
few years ago they were very plentiful. 
The country has been settled up pretty 
fast lately and much of the natural low- 
lands where the grouse once bred in large 
numbers has been cleared up for agri- 
cultural uses and the birds, driven from 
their natural haunts and relentlessly pun- 
ished by tin-horn sports and other nat- 
ural enemies, have, in consequence, di- 
minished almost to the vanishing point. 
Our blue quail too, one of our beloved 
acquaintances, has followed the path of 
the grouse. 

"Bob whites alone are on the in- 
crease." 

[It is evident in Oregon, as elsewhere that 
the upland game birds can not stand the 
sports and the other "natural enemies" pro- 
vided any shooting be permitted and no one 
is permitted to look after the natural foods 
and covers on some of the lands which are, 
"cleared up for agriculture." We are glad to 
learn that bob white can survive as a song- 
bird in Oregon. We have never doubted that 
it is right and proper to put this bird on the 
song-bird list in places where is it a crime to 
profitably produce it for sport or for food. 
All we ask is that it be not regarded as a 
singer in places where those who prefer sport 
to game laws, keep it abundant, and shoot 
it properly every season. The game shooting 
clubs (many with very small dues) have 
plenty of quail every season in all of the 
free states where quail production is not a 
criminal performance. — Editor.] 



Quail Breeders. 

The people who produce quail and 
grouse, on lands which they own, from 
stock birds legally procured undoubted- 
ly own the birds produced by their indus- 
try. We are glad to observe that these 
people are selling their quail and eggs 
(without interference) to other breeders 
who wish to produce quail. Laws in- 
tended to protect wild game, said to be 
owned by the state, evidently do not ap- 
ply to birds produced by industry and 
owned by game breeders. Some breed- 
ers soon will be prepared to sell quail to 
the state game officers who have been 
obliged to send their money to Mexico 
for quail. We doubt if a state depart- 
ment would survive if it made a prac- 
tice of arresting game breeders. It might 
as well raid hen roosts. 



Popular Game Preserving. 

The Game Conservation Society be- 
lieves that if one-half or even one-fourth 
of the farms which are now closed to all 
shooting can be utilized for sport all of 
the sportsmen in America will enjoy far 
better shooting than they now have. 

It is evident that the farmers who 
have posted their lands have no inten- 
tion of ever again opening them to the 
gunners. In entire states the farmers 
have favored the prohibition of quail 
shooting since they have observed that 
trespassers do not heed the notices and 
persist in shooting without permission. 
Having been told that the quail are bene- 
ficial to agriculture they object to the 
kind of shooting which must result in the 
extermination of the quail. No upland 
game can stand the shooting of very 
small bags by a large number of guns 
without decreasing in numbers since it 
is a scientific fact well known that if we 
add to the checks to the increase of any 
species it rapidly will vanish and soon 
will become extinct. 

Our advice to the sportsmen who wish 
to preserve upland shooting is to form 
inexpensive game shooting clubs and to 
rent the shooting on some of the posted 
farms. We believe if the sportsmen 
will organize to secure more game in 



116 



THE GAME BREEDER 



this way they will find they can have 
good shooting under very natural condi- 
tions. 



More Law. 



A California senator writes to one of 
our readers : 

"In reply to yours of recent date rela- 
tive to the passage of a bill affecting the 
present game law, I beg to advise that 
there was a. bill in the senate last week 
which passed at first, but we discovered 
that it would affect the domestic raising 
of pheasants, and we thereupon moved 
for a re-consideration of the bill and 
had it re-considered and sent back to the 
committee from which it came, so as the 
matter stands at present there has been 
no change in the game- law, and we will 
see that the present law is not amended." 



American Game. 

Mr. Leopold's idea that game farmers 
prefer pheasants is erroneous. He says : 
"If Chinese pheasant is cheaper and 
easier to raise than the American heath 
hen, then let the heath hen go hang." 

Commercial game farmers, would be 
glad to sell heath hens, quail prairie 
grouse and other birds and their eggs. 
Sporting game breeders will pay even 
better prices for these than for the 
pheasant which does not lie well to the 
dog. The pheasant is considered the 
more expensive bird to rear. Quail can 
be produced much more cheaply than 
pheasants and we have no doubt the same 
is true of grouse, including the heath 
hen. Audubon says prairie grouse easily 
were produced. They were produced 
cheaply The reason why pheasants are 
being substituted for American game 
birds is that until recently it was illegal 
everywhere to trap American game birds 
for breeding purposes, to transport them 
and to sell the birds and eggs for breed- 
ing purposes. 

It is evident if one product can be 
handled legally and another ..cannot be 
that one will become abundant before 
the other. This has happened. 

Here again Mr. Leopold will observe 
that the "more game and fewer game 



laws" movement started something quite 
worth while. Quail and quail eggs are 
now sold for breeding purposes and the 
grouse and grouse eggs soon will be. 

The large importations of quail from 
Mexico do not indicate that the game 
farmers or the sporting game breeders 
prefer pheasants. We know some who 
will not have pheasants at any price. 
There are some owners of American 
game birds who think the pheasants in- 
terfere with them. 

Freedom would seem to suggest that 
game farmers and sporting game breed- 
ers should be permitted to make the 
American game birds abundant. There 
can be no doubt that American game 
farmers and sportsmen are not opposed 
to breeding and selling quail and we 
never heard of one who wished to 
'.'hang" the heath hen. The heath hen 
and the grouse will bring splendid 
prices and it is quite certain that the 
breeders must have some birds to lay 
eggs for them before they can make 
these birds as abundant as the pheasants 
are. 

Mr. Leopold's idea that the game 
farmers are prejudiced against heath 
hens, quail and grouse is erroneous. 

Mr. Leopold's idea that there is a 
controversy surely is erroneous. We 
probably may have caused him to think 
there was when we made some playful 
remarks about ''our enemies are publish- 
ing a monthly magazine," but our read- 
ers called for more practical articles 
about game breeding and soon ceased to 
be amused at what Mr. Leopold thinks 
was a controversy. The matter was for- 
gotten long ago. We are for camera 
hunting and everything sentimental. We 
are for free shooting, refuges, quiet and 
noisy, and for all attempts to produce 
"more game" and to reduce the appalling 
output of "more game laws." We never 
should be called enemies of common 
sense since that is what we advocate. 



CORRESPONDENCE 
A New Member. 
Game Breeders' Gazette : 

Dear Sirs — I hear that there is a game 



THE GAME BREEDER 



117 



breeders' gazette What is the annual 
subscription rate for Canada ? Have you 
any back samples containing articles on 
water fowl such as teal, widgeon, duck, 
geese and swan breeding? 

I have the best collection of water 
fowl in Canada. I will call on you when 
next in New York. I have had a lot of 
experience in vermin destruction At 
present I have quite a puzzle to solve as 
two of my white swans have died within 
a week and one of my blacks has mys- 
teriously disappeared. I am a member 
of the Waterfowl Club of Canada, also 
a member of the Northern Nut Growers 
Association. My present hobby is to 
try and breed whistler swans, and later 
•on a cross between whooper and whist- 
lers, should I succeed in the first in- 
stance. It may take years and lots of 
waiting, but I can watch a hickory grow. 
I have 17 acres of a most beautiful 
valley in a lonely place close to Toronto. 
A clear continuous running creek -flows 
through the center of the valley and 
woods crest the hillsides. It is pro- 
tected from the north and northwest 
winds and exposed to the winter sun. 

G. H. Corsan. 

Editor, Game Breeder. 

I will be glad to pay the express 
charge on any shipment you may send 
me of game bird eggs that are not suit- 
able for hatching. I should be able to 
recognize the Gambels when I see them, 
but may not know the other species un- 
less some memorandum is also enclosed 
to let me know what they are. A 1 
might be marked on a few eggs, and on 
a memorandum opposite 1 name the bird 
it represents, a 2 on a few others, etc. 

Pennsylvania. C. B. K. 

Thousands More. 

Editor, Game Breeder. 

I have sold all of my surplus stock of 
pheasants for this season. There was an 
immense demand for live pheasants and 
I could have sold thousands more of 
them if I only had them. There's cer- 
tainly a great future for pheasants in 
our country. 

C. W. Sieger. 



The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 

I received The Game Breeder today 
and immediately got very much interest- 
ed in it. It sure is the best magazine 
published on the subject I like to think 
of most: breeding animals, pheasants and 
ducks. Keep up the good work and the 
fight for better game laws in New York. 



Yours for more game, 
New York. 



R. V. P. 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 
No Hitch. 

From the Hot Springs Thomas Cat. 

Bert Hall, who came in from Peavine 
Ridge Saturday, reports that the Ander- 
son wedding went off without a hitch 
Thursday night. Groom didn't show up. 

Kentifcky Hospitality. 

A Kentucky farmer is reported in the 
Angler & Huntsman to have posted his 
farm with the following notice to tres- 
passers : 

Hunters take Notice: Hunt all you 
durn please and when you hear the horn 
blow, come to the house for dinner. If 
you accidentally kill a cow, skin her and 
hang the hide in the barn. If the quail 
are scarce, kill a chicken or two, and if 
you can't get any squirrels kill a hog. 

The Better Way. 

From the Baltimore American. 

One way to get the old job back is to 
marry the girl that has it. 

[After you do so, fire the old job. Get 
some land from Uncle Sam and start a game 
farm. — Editor.] 

Narrow Confines. 

Hibbs — Rover never runs to the door 
to meet me any more, wagging his tail. 

Mrs. Hibbs — I know he'd like to, dear, 
but in this flat there isn't room for him 
to wag it. 

[Tell the dog to wag his tail up and down 
instead of sideways. All the dogs in the 
Harlem flats have learned to do this. — 
Editor.] 



118 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, JULY, 1919. 

TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C Huntington, Secretary. 

E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



DEATH OF A BENEFICIAL. 

When a "beneficial" red-shouldered 
hawk takes "a perfectly healthy female 
brook trout 13 inches long," as reported 
in the Massachusetts annual report, it 
would seem that he had acquired a per- 
verted appetite and that the death pen- 
alty was properly imposed. In the case 
reported, however, it seems that the 
trout was discovered after the penalty 
was inflicted and that the culprit was 
shot on suspicion, as it were. However, 
we all learned something from the event 
and even if the red-shoulder is a pro- 
tected species — "the king can do no 
wrong," and the killing was a state af- 
fair, and besides it seems sort of mean 
in the hawk to take a female brook trout. 



WE'RE ALL DOING IT. 

"There is a nationwide determination 
that something must be done," says Mr. 
Leopold. 

Game breeders everywhere are doing 
it on a large scale. State game officers 
also are doing it. They are purchasing 
thousands of game birds and game eggs 
from game breeders. 

They are controlling a lot of vermin 
on the farms where they produce "more 



one night by the "beneficial skunks" at 
a Massachusetts game farm lends em- 
phasis to the idea that "something must 
be done." Something, no doubt, was 
done to the skunks. 

A record of 147 pheasants eaten by 
pigs at a meal also suggests a new ac- 
tivity. There are many interesting 
things which must be done. 

One reason why game breeding is so 
interesting to thousands of people is the 
numerous unusual things which must be 
done. 

Owen Jones, an Oxford graduate, who 
says he was destined for the church but 
decided to become a game keeper, says 
he found many interesting things to be 
done ; he found the control of vermin 
good sport. 

"We're all doing it," and none of us 
are rueing it. 



game. 



The record of forty pheasants taken in 



RULES OF THE TRADE. 

As the game breeding industry has 
become a big one trade rules and cus- 
toms are beginning to be considered and 
discussed. Numerous interesting prop- 
ositions are put to The Game Breeder. 

It is a well established rule with most 
game farmers that the cash must accom- 
pany the order for game birds and quad- 
rupeds and eggs. The shipping usually 
is at the risk of the purchaser. Often 
an extra charge is made for the guar- 
antee of live arrival. 

Many of the controversies relate to 
the fertility of eggs and breakage due 
to bad packing. A vefy large number of 
cases have been handled by the game 
guild this year. When the eggs are re- 
ceived by a capable gamekeeper or an 
expert game farmer the fertility is easily 
ascertained, and in many cases satisfac- 
tory settlements have been made. In 
one case the eggs were very bad and 
blew up when placed in an incubator. 
The shipper made a settlement. 

The dealings of game farmers with 
each other has been discussed in our 
mail and our opinion has been asked 
about the proper prices in such cases. 

In most industries where one dealer 
buys from another in order to re-sell a 



THE GAME BREEDER 



110 



discount is made from the market price 
to enable the purchaser to sell at a profit. 
When one publisher, for example, pur- 
chases books from another he gets the 
trade discount always ; and so it is, we 
believe, in most business transactions of 
this character. Some game farmers we 
know make a special price to dealers and 
this amicable rule always should prevail. 
It is more important that the dealers in 
the game breeding industry should help 
each other and be on the most friendly 
terms than it is in any other industry. 
The trade is much hampered by restric- 
tive laws, some of which are reasonable, 
but there have been entirely too many 
cases where ignorant game wardens have 
acted as if they were sure the state 
owned all the game and that they were 
the state. Some of the more outrageous 
performances have been reported and 
discussed in The Game Breeder. The 
society has defended some cases and has 
brought others to an end by correspond- 
ence, or by giving publicity to the out- 
rage. 

Our advice to the game farmers and 
sporting breeders is to stick well together 
and to act on the most friendly terms, 
giving trade discounts always when deal- 
ing with other dealers. The industry 
will grow so rapidly that all will be bene- 
fitted. Competition is the life of trade 
and friendly dealing is its twin brother. 



PECULIAR IDEAS OF DEMO- 
CRACY. 

Mr. Leopold says the European sys- 
tem of game management is undemocra- 
tic, unsocial and therefore dangerous. 
He admits that it is a fact that in Amer- 
ica "the posting of farm lands, theories 
of democracy to the contrary notwith- 
standing, is in some places fast render- 
ing free hunting a thing of the past." 
This is a fact and not a theory and we 
must face it as such, he says. 

We have long known the reason 
why upland field shooting rapidly was 
coming to an end. The farms are the 
best places for quail, grouse and pheas- 
ants, and (some of them) for ducks, 



woodcock and snipe, all of which re- 
spond to proper care. 

Mr. Leopold sees that the posting of 
the lands by farmers makes it impossi- 
sible for state game departments to carry 
out his idea ol free shooting. It is pe- 
culiar to say that democracy vanishes 
when a farmer refuses to allow all tres- 
passers to shoot up his place. It is 
peculiar to say that a farmer should not 
have the right profitably to produce any 
plant or animal on his farm. 

There are more people in America 
who may be heard to say that no r one 
should shoot for the pleasure of shoot- 
ing than there are who will say that the 
farms must be thrown open to trespass- 
ers and that the farmer must be arrested 
if he produces and sells food. 

Mr. Leopold jumps at the conclusion 
that the game farmers are opposed to 
restrictive game laws which certainly 
limit the freedom of shooters. We are 
quite sure there is no opposition to re- 
strictions and we deplore the fact that 
they must be increased to supplement the 
posting of the farms by their owners. 
All that we have ever asked is that the 
restrictions be not applied to producers; 
that the people be not arrested for food 
production. Our sympathies are with 
the poorer classes (this is where we re- 
side) who should have game and 3hoot- 
ing if they wish to do so and who should 
sell some game to help pay their ex- 
penses if necessary. 

Our ideas of democracy are different 
from those of Mr. Leopold. We do not 
think that true democracy demands that 
the people must be arrested if they have 
game birds or eggs in their possession 
for food — or even for sport-producing 
purposes. We do not believe that true 
democracy demands that the farms be 
thrown open to trespassers with the hope 
that they will only destroy the game and 
will not shoot farm animals or steal 
melons. 

As to "sociability," referred to by Mr. 
Leopold, we have had some very socia- 
ble times when shooting with market 
gunners ; we have had some very socia- 
ble times when shooting with people who 
have organized game shooting clubs and 



120 



THE GAME BREEDER 



who look after the wild breeding game 
sufficiently to keep it abundant every sea- 
son. We fail to see anything undemo- 
cratic in their paying the farmers a few 
cents per acre or the amount of their 
taxes for the privilege of turning down 
game on farms where there was none 
and where they enjoy good shooting. 
The restoration of free shooting would 
again close the farms to all gunners and 
result in laws putting the quail on the 
song bird list. If these remedies be not 
applied the game would again become ex- 
tinct. 

The most important matters over- 
looked by Mr. Leopold are : ( 1) That 
free shooting without some production 
means extermination; (2) that there are 
vast areas in America which are game- 
less and a small portion of the posted 
farms alone can be made to provide 
shooting for all who are industrious ; (3) 
the sale of some of the game produced 
will make it possible for sportsmen of 
small means to have good shooting where 
there is none today; (4) the area of the 
United States is larger than the area of 
more populous countries where all 
classes, including market gunners, shoot; 
(5) our laws of entailment and primo- 
geniture prevent the entailment and per- 
petuation of estates in families; (6) it is 
legal to drain vast areas and put an end 
to duck shooting. It is legal to estab- 
lish large cattle and sheep ranches and 
dairies which exterminate game. It is 
legal to create bonanza wheat farms and 
by plowing a vast area at a time to ex- 
terminate the prairie grouse and quail. 
It should be legal for sportsmen who 
wish to do so to combine and share the 
expense of saving some of the areas re- 
ferred to for sport. 

It seems peculiar to insist that democ- 
racy requires that the industrious should 
be put out of business by small sporting 
politicians who are unwilling to proper^ 
lv look after game on the places now 
closed to shooting. 

Intelligent sportsmen concede the de- 
sirability o<f trespass laws and rapidly 
many of them are making terms with the 
farmers under which they have inexpen- 
sive shooting. 



We join Mr. Leopold in urging the 
states to provide big parks for indigent 
gunners. New York has very big ones. 
There is plenty of land. 



Grouse Wanted. 

The Game Breeder : 

In the February number of The Game 
Breeder you state in an article on "What 
Grouse Owners Should Do" that you 
are willing to assist anyone in getting a 
start with grouse. Can you refer me to 
someone of whom I can buy eggs or 
stock of ruffed prairie or sharp-tailed or 
any variety of grouse? If you can I 
will appreciate it very much. Trusting 
to hear from you, and hoping to see 
you keep your good little paper on deck, 

I am, yours truly, 

J. Miles Robinson, 
U. S. Dep. Game Warden. 

Nebraska. 

[We were told by the U. S. Biological 
Survey that the State Game Commission of 
Nebraska possibly would issue permits to take 
grouse and eggs for breeding purposes. We 
suggest that you apply to George G. Koster, 
Chief Deputy, Lincoln, Nebraska, stating just 
what you want and what you propose to do. 
You might try, also, E. C. Hinchaw, State 
Fish and Game Warden for Iowa, whose ad- 
dress is Spirit Lake, Iowa. We hope you will 
report the results promptly to The Game 
Breeder. 

We are expecting daily to receive a few 
grouse from another state and later some 
eggs, but we have long ceased to count this 
class of chickens until they are hatched 
when we will give publicity to the result and 
proper credit to those who perform a great 
public service. We are glad to learn that you 
evidently agree with us that is is thne to save 
the grouse from extinction and to restore 
grouse shooting by practical gair.'e breeding 
methods. Write to the U. S. Biological Sur- 
vey, Washington, D. C, for additional advice 
about procuring grouse. Dr. Fisher, of the 
Survey, read a paper on "A Plea for the 
Breeding of American Grouse" at a Protective 
Society meeting and of course should know 
where to get birds and eggs for the purpose. 
We will tell you how to breed grouse when 
you get stock birds. — Editor.] 



The country is so big there is plenty 
of room for all kinds of shooting. All 
that is needed is "more game," and the 
permission of the farmers for orderly 



shooting. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



121 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
i»» and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE TOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 



R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We Furnish Eggs in Season 



^W^^ i iW^lliWili g 



J6-- 




F.B.DUSETTE& SONS' GAME RANCH 



BAD AXE, MICH. 



BREEDERS OF: 



Pure Wild Mallards, Black Ducks, 
Wild Turkeys and Bob White Quail 

Our game is grown on our 240- Acre Ranch, with natural feed on 
our Several Lakes, which makes our stock very attractive for 
Breeders, Shooting Clubs and Preserve Owners at a minimum 
price. Our birds comply with the Federal regulations which 
permit shooting and sale. 

Contracts Now Open for August and September 
No Eggs for Sale This Season 

F. B. DUSETTE & SONS, BAD AXE, MICH. 



122 



THE GAME BREEDER 




FENCES 

POR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 



J. H. 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE 



DOWNS 

Suite A JERSEY CITY, IN. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



THE HONEYSWEET 

BLACK RASPBERRY 

Best for Home and Market 

The bushes make good cover for game. 

Strawberry and Asparagus Plants. 

Price Lists Free. 

A. B. KATKAMIER MACEDON. N. Y. 



£*^. 


BOOK OJV 


^^1 


DOG DISEASES 


'Iwjjp* 


And How to Feed 


'v N ">1$P 


Mailed free to any address by 


America's 


, the Author 


Pioneer 


H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 


Dog Medicines 


118 West 31st Street, New York 



FREE FOUNDATION STOCK 

furnished to raise Rabbits, Cavies or 
Pigeons. Send dime for particulars and 
paper. 

Young"s Tanning Compound, easily applied to any 
skin, large can $1.00, trial can 50c. Tattoo Ear 
Marker $1.50. Ear Tags 30c per dozen. Gibson's 
wonderful Rabbit Book $1.00. Cavy Book 50c. 
Squab Culture, a recognized authority on raising 
pigeons for profit, $1.00. 

NATIONAL FANCIER & BREEDER 

335 South East Avenue, Oak Park, III. 



The Breeders' and Fanciers' News 

SCRANTON, PA. 

devoted to the breeding and marketing of ducks 
geese, turkeys (including the wild varieties), rab- 
bits, cavies, pigeons, etc. Organ of the American 
Buttercup Club, and Waterfowl Club of America. 
Interesting and instructive articles by able writers. 

SOc a Year, 3 Years for $1.00 
Canada 75c a Year, 3 Years $1.75 

Special Trial Offer in U. S-, 8 Months for 25c 

AD. RATES: 75c an inch, or for 3 months or more 
at rate of 65c an inch. Classified, 2c a word. 

Address 
BREEDERS' AND FANCIERS' NEWS 

1558 Dickson Ave., Scranton, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.*' 



THE GAME BREEDER 123 



Galvanized 
STEEL WIRE NETTING 

for Game Farms and Preserves 

We are prepared to quote lowest prices for all widths 
up to 72 inches from ^ to 2 inch mesh and No. 
14 to 20 gauge. We can guarantee prompt deliv- 
ery to any point. 

If you are going to start a game ranch, farm or 
preserve this year or contemplate enlarging your 
old one, get our prices before placing your order 
elsewhere. 

Price list on application. 

HAVERSTICK & COMPANY, Inc. Trenton, New Jersey. 



T P 



THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS 

of BERRY, KENTUCKY 

offer for sale, Setters and Pointers, Fox and Cat Hounds, Wolf 
and Deer Hounds, Coon and Opossum Hounds, Varmint and 
Rabbit Hounds, Bear and Lion Hounds, also Airedale terriers. 
All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser alone to judge the quality, 
satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. Sixty-eight page, 
highly illustrated, instructive, and interesting catalogue for 
ten cents in stamps or coin. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



124 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE 



It Is Now Legal to Trap Wild 
Fowl for Breeding Purposes 

Write to The Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, for information about Trapping Permits 

The book, OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS, written by the 
Editor of The Game Breeder, contains full information about the 
trapping of wild fowl and how to rear the birds for profit and 
for sport. There are chapters on How to Form Shooting Clubs ; 
How to Control the Enemies of Wild Fowl, etc. Fully illustrated 
with pictures of ducks on preserves, etc. 

PRICE, #2.00 POSTPAID 

THE GAME BREEDER, 1 50 Nassau St., NEW YORK 




Decoy Owls for Crow 
and Hawk Shooting 



PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

1 5 Whitehall Street, New York 



Established 1860 
Telephone 4569 Spring 



Fred Sauter 



Leading Taxidermist of America 



42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 



Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 



Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



fn writing to advertisers i>lea<- mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



125 



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Wc Arc Now 

Booking 

Orders for 

Eggs 

for Spring Delivery from the following vari- 
eties of pheasants : Silver, Golden. Ringneck, 
Lady Amherst, Formosan, White, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Swinhoe, Versicolor. Impeyan, Soem- 
mering, Manchurian Eared, Melanotus, Black- 
throated Golden, Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, Long- 
tails, and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff Orping- 
ton and R. I. Red fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane. Swan and Fancy Ducks, 
Doves of several varieties. Deer. Jack 
Rabbits 

Send $1. 00 in stamps for Colortppe Catalogue 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 

CHINESE PHEASANT EGGS, $3.00 A DOZEN. CAM 
use tame squirrel and Hungarian Partridge Eggs. 
P W. SCHWEHM, 4219 4th Ave., N. E., Seattle, Wash- 
ington^ 2t 

PHEASANTS WANTED 
I will buy ringnecked pheasants regardless of sex at 
long as they are strong, healthy birds, large and no 
over two years old. Will purchase small or large n u m- 
bers for cash. Reference by permission to the Game 
Breeder. ROBT. BOWMAN, care Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

BANTAMS — GOOD GENTLE BIRDS SUITABLE 
for quail and pheasant breeding JOHN E. DARBY, 
Prop., Maplehurst Poultry Farm, Croswell, Michigan. 

BANTAMS — WIL BERT'S FAMOUS BANTAMS. 
Forty varieties. Shipped on approval. Catalog 3(5. 
F. C. WILBERT, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



WANTED 

Twenty=Five Sportsmen 

to join me in an exclusive hunting 
and fishing club. Property in Orange 
and Sullivan Counties, N. Y., adjoin- 
ing the Hartwood Club, the Merrie- 
wold Club and the famous Chester 
W. Chapin game preserve. For par- 
ticulars, apply to 

J. S. HOLDEN, PORT JERVIS, N.Y. 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dods Trained for Shooting. 

Youn^ Do^s Suitable for Training. 
WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN K E N IN E L S 



Grand Island 



Erie Co., New York 



Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



EGGS 



HOUNDS-ALL KINDS. BIG50PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky.. 

ofter for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
!l a year. 



TWO THOUSAND PHEASA.NT EGGS FOR SALE. 
Pure Chinese, $3.50 per dozen. Ringnecks, Golden, 
Silver and Mallard Duck, «3.00 per dozen. $20.00 per 
hundred. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL FARM, 
Manzanita, Oregon. 4t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. 825.00 

per 100. Golden Pheasant Eggs, 60c. each. Day old 

Pheasants, 60c. each. Booking orders now. Mrs. EDGAR 

TIlTON.Suffern, N.Y. 51 

STOCK AND EGGS OF RINGNECKS, LADY 
Amherst, Golden and Silver Pheasants. Wild strain 
Mallards. Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams. 
" Ringlet " Barred Plymouth Rock Chickens Peafowl. 
MRS. IVER CHR1STENSON, Jamestown, Kansas. 
No. 1. • 6t 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



126 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Breeders' Cards 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 

Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 




PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringneoks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 

REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 
TROUT & HARES. 
Rugged pups, bred on highest 
ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 
Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 
Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 
Goats. Belgium and FlemishHares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 
FOX RANCH 
Onawa - Maine 
ber of the Game Guild. 




Mem 




PHEASANT EGGS AND PHEASANTS 

Pheasant eggs for sale up to 
May 15, $25.00 per hundred. 
110 eggs sent for cash with 
order after May 15, $20 per 
110 eggs. Pheasants for Sep- 
tember and October delivery. 
Write for prices. GEORGE 
BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
R No. 1, Englishtown, New 
Jersey. 



LIVE GAME/ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 








GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 



Mallard-Pintail 



DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 

These ducks are reared on free range 
especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.50 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 
8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhers{s, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 

We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 
ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 

Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 

45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, "Our Wild Fowl and Waders, ' ' 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 






writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yourg for More Gam* 



THE GAME BREEDER 



127 





GAME BIRDS 

All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

' 'Our Feathered Game, ' ' written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggs in season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WANTED— PAIR OF RED-FOX PUPS, MALE AND 
female. Z. TED DeKALMAR, R. F. D. 30, Stam- 
ford, Conn. 



A MILLION FOOD RABBITS WANTED—WE CAN 
sell a million food Rabbits every month right here in 
Chicago and pay you 170 a pound live weight.and all who 
have wearied of gambling in Rabbits a d raising them 
merely for pets when the whole world is clamoring for 
food should turn in and help raise the Rabbits (or us 
Send for full particulars in the July. August and Septem- 
ber issues of the RABBIT MAGAZINE, OAK PARK, 
ILLINOIS. Only 25£ for the three months (none free) 
Do not miss this wonderful opportunity. 



OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS 

Is a practical book on the breeding of Wild Ducks and 
the proper management of Waders. 

PRICE $2.00 POSTPAID. 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5. cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING-PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 lor 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, North Carolina. 8t 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 

FOX AND MINK WANTED 

Wanted — Hair red fox pups ; also breeders ; pair mink 
and marten R. H. BARKER, 2034 East Fourth St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. It 

LIVE GAME 

AMHERST, REEVES, SILVER AND MONGOLIAN 
Pheasant eggs $5.00 a dozen, two dozen, $9.00. Chinese 
Ringnecks, 83-50 a dozen, $2500 a hundred. Mongolians, 
#35. 00 a hundred "Pheasant Farming," illustrated, 50c. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 2 t 

WANTED TO BUY PHEASANTS.. I WANT 

Silvers. Lady Amherst. Golden and Reeves. 
Quote Prices, Ages, and Quantity. 

Morgan's. Phsntry, 244 E. 61st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

' WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 

in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 

County. Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, Melanotus. Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3t 

GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS FOR HATCHING. 

fifty cents a piece. FOXHOLLOW FARM, Rhine- 

beck, New York. It 

PHEASANTS AND EGGS FOR SALE. GOLDENS 

Lady Amhersis, Versicolors, Manchurian Eared. Gold, 

en Eggs $5.00, and Lady Amherst $7.00 per dozen- 

ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, Canada. 2t 



RAISE SILVER FOXES. NEW SYNDICATE JUST 
started. New plan. Not much money needed. Your 
location will not interfere. Particulars free. C. T. DRYZ, 
5244 South Maplewood Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. G1FFORD 
GRAY, 2i Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals, bee display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

BELGIAN HARES-GET YOUR BREEDERS FROM 
me, pedigreed and utility matured and young stock for 
sale, best grade stock. State wants fully no catalog 
ROSEDALE RABBITRY, " Reliable Rabbit Raiser," 
730 College Ave., Rosedale, Kansas. 

FOR SALE—PHEASANTS, PEA FOWL, PIGEONS, 
Poultry, Bantams and Pit Games Eggs from the 
above stock for sale. Rabbits, Cavies, Squirrels, fur 
bearing animals, etc. I buv, sell and exchange. L L 
KIRKPATRICK, Box 273, Bristol, Tenn. 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants. Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



Pheasants Wanted 

WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAIN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. qi 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



128 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FIVE VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. WILD DUCKS. 

Wild Geese, Brants. Wild Turkeys and other Game, 

List for stamp. G. H HARRIS, Taylorville, Illinois. 4 t 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— FOR FANCY DUCKS 
geese or pheasants 15 pair of 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds Ducks S8.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton. Ohio. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS FOR SALE. LARGE, HARDY 

specimens. Satisfaction guaranteed. LEWIS 

COMPTON, Dias Creek, New Jersey. 2t 

HAVE SIX MALE CANVASBACKS FOR SALE, 
$10.00 each or will exchange for wood duck pairs. 
These are band raised from pure wild stock. Have a few 
canvasback eggs for sale, $12. 00 per dozen. A. WOLFE, 
9848 76th Ave., Edmonton, S., Alberta, Canada It 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HAR E, THE GREATEST 

rabbit for flesh and fur in the world. Send tor full 

information and price list. SIBERIAN FUR FARM, 

Hamilton, Canada. (it 



EGGS 

PHEASANT EGGS — RINGNECK, S2.50 PER 13. 

Wild Mallard Eggs. $1.50 per 11. JOHN SAMMONS, 

Yankton, South Dakota. 2t 

GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS, $5.00 per dozen. Cash 
with order. F. W. DANE, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 3t 

PURE BRED WILD DUCK EGGS FOR SALE— 
From my New, Jersey farm, pure bred, light gray wild 
mallard duck eggs. Stock strong on wing. $3.50 per 13 ; 
S25.00 per 100. H. W. VAN ALEN, 215 Montague St,, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 2t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery. Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



IF YOU WOULD BE SUCCESSFUL IN RAISING 
a high per cent of your baby birds — quail, pheasants, 
wild turkeys, etc., feed them MEAL WORMS, a choice, 
clean, insect food. 500, $(.00; 1,000, $1.50; 5-000, $5.00. 
Express prepaid. See last year s advertisements in Anril, 
June and August numbers. C. R. KERN, Mount Jov, 
Pennsylvania. 2 f . 



GAMEKEEPERS 

GAMEKEEPER AT LIBERTY. RELIABLE, WANTS 
position on club preserve or game farm. Expeiienced 
on game and ornamental birds or animals, gun dogs and 
extermination of vermin. MILTON, in care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 



WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION. THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country, M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, r5o Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
■ iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. THOR- 

oughly experienced in rearing Pheasants. Wild Turkeys 

and Wild Ducks. Good references. GAMEKEEPER, 

463 East 57th St., N. Y. C. it 

WANTED—SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER WITH 
a game shooting club or preserve owner. Experienced 
in breeding all species of game, dog breaking and the 
control of vermin. Good reterences. WM. I. STRANG, 
care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

YOUNG MAN, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN 
service. General knowledge of game breeding and 
farming. Exceptional dairy experience. Thoroughly 
experienced in handling pedigreed horses, cattle and 
sheep. Best reference. Availabl e right away. J. A 
TYLER, care of THOMAS MacINTYRE, 9129 121st 
Street, Richmond Hill, Long Island, N. Y. 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady AmHersts, Reeves, Swinhoes. 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared, 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c. postoaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Excellent 
references. Age 36. married. W. E. B.. care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house of six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



(n writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Your* for More Game." 




Quail, Bob whites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
gfame birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 &1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
md Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
he large State orders for botfe Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Are from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other specie** 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and aM 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America ot ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Koyal Swans of England I nave line lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I hare SO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 
I have for years rilled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay yon to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia 




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WM. J. MACKENSEN 



Department V. 



YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 




Game Farm or Preserve 



A large tract of land suitable for a game farm or 
preserve is offered for sale at an attractive price. 

The land is near New York on a good Automobile 
Road and contains a large pond and stream. There 
are some trout and the waters can be made to yield 
large numbers of these fish. The land is suitable for 
deer, upland game and wild ducks. I shall be pleased 
to show this property to anyone wishing to start a 
game farm or preserve. 

The place is within fifty miles of the City and can be 
reached by Automobile in an hour and a half. 

For particulars address, 

======================= OWNER ======================== 



Care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York 



S'ij.,Ucj 




■Single Copies 10 <P 




TH Er 



GAN E DBEEDffi 



VOL. XV 



AUGUST, 1919 



No. 5 




The- Object op this magazine is 
to Make- North America the- 5iogest 
Gahe Producing Country in the World 



CO NTEN TS 

The Farmer and the Law— Death of a Game Farm— Various 
Opinions— Wild Ducks— Too Much Publicity— Private Breeders 
Succeed— The Wrong Remedy— Many Breeders in California- 
Safe Arrival of Canvas Backs— Free Shooting— Shooting Hotels 
—Another Excellent Plan— An Important Matter— Good Advice 
— Expensive Game. 

Game Farms and Preserves - Theodore "Rouault, Jr. 

Land For Returning Soldiers - F. W. Wilson 

The 10th Cat and Three Broods of Quail - By the Editor 
Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - By Our Readers 
King Birds— A Call for Notes— Market Prices— New Cus- 
tomers—Buckwheat—Long Island Quail — Deer Shooting- 
Quail Eggs Profitable— The Breeding Season— Casualties- 
Wild Ducks — Quail — Pheasants — Wild Breeding Quail — 
Cheap^ Shooting — New Places — Good Purchasers — Chicks 
Hatched by Steam — Trying It Out — A Contract— Sports- 
men Buy Adirondack Preserve — Quail and Pheasants — 
Bounty Figures— Migratory Bird Law Constitutional- Sage 
Cock — The Dove— Correspondence— Prizes. 
Outings and Innings, Trade Notes. 

Editorials— Rapid Growth of the Industry — More About Cider 
—Chances About Even— The State and Game Farmers' Game- 
Prize Letters Wanted. 



Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July 6, 1915, at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE- GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A 




iJkl 



: ■*, 



...jU 




A Dog Food That 
Is All Food 

Made of the finest quality 
and most nourishing in- 
gredients only— including 
Meat Fibrine-SPRATT'S 
Dog Cakes and Puppy 
Biscuits are to-day, as during the last 50 years, recog- 
nized by dog lovers as the standard food that maintains 
dogs in perfect health and strength. 

Spratt's Biscuits do not contain added sugar 
or chemicals, which are frequently introduced 
to make inferior foods attractive. 



"Spratt's Dog Culture" 

illustrates and describes 
the food for YOUR dog. 



Write for a copy (stating breed). 




mim% 





SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED, 



Newark, N. J. 



Cleveland, Ohio. 



San Francisco, Calif. St. Louis, Mo. 

FACAORY ALSO IN LONDON, ENGLAND. 

Look for the Trade Mark "X" on every Biscuit. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



129 



HIGH GUN 
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Bunch Your Hits! 

Give your gun a chance to show what it can do! 
Don't be satisfied with an average score at the traps 
— or a hit-or-miss day in the field. Bunch your 
hits and keep 'em bunched by shooting shells loaded 
with Infallible or " E. C." 

You can shoot these powders in your favorite shell, 
for any one of the 14 standard brands listed at the 
left can be bought loaded with 

HERCULES 

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POWDERS 



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These powders never vary. They will always burn free and 
clean, give high velocity with light recoil and uniformly even 
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The next time you buy loaded shells insist that they be loaded 
with a Hercules Smokeless Shotgun Powder. Look on the 
end of the box or on the top wad of the shell for the name 
Infallible or "E. C." 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

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130 



THE GAME BREEDER 



y V : ,: , W "T^ TT ^~^~ r ~~^^" 



Let your trap gun purchase be a PARKER. 
Be one of the thousands of satisfied PARKER 
Gun users. 




PARKER Guns are made by gun experts. The 
purchaser of a PARKER Gun receives in good sub- 
stantial gun value, the benefits of experience in gun 
manufacturing of over 50 years. 

Once you have used the PARKER, you will never 
be satisfied with anything but the BEST. 

Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not 
now? 

Send for catalogue and free booklet about 20 bore guns. 



PARKER BROS. 

Master Gun Makers MERIDEN, CONN.. U. S. A 

New York Salesrooms, 25 Murray Street 



JVI^illo^cl^ Teal, 


Quail 


and 




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Pure-bred Birds Raised Under Semi-Natural Conditions 


Z. TED DeKALMAR, R. P. D, No. 30, 


Stamford, Conn. 


STATE GAME LICENSE No 123. FEDERAL I 


'ERMIT No. 1. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY 

BREEDERS OF 

Pheasants, Peafowl, Waterfowl, Quail, 

Ornamental Birds, Utility Flemish Giant 

and New Zealand Red Rabbits, etc. 



If States, Preserves and Hunting Clubs will place their orders for 
next season before shipping time this year we will supply early 
hatched birds and early eggs in any quantity desired. As we were 
compelled to refuse orders for thousands of both birds and eggs 
this year, we advise placing your order as soon as possible. We can 
ship safely any place in the United States. Correspondence solicited. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY, 



MARMOT, OREGON 



Jn writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game."' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



131 



OH 



iin..'iii 







¥0? t$ffi%W* 



Sport That Thrills 

The scurry of quail in the thicket is music to the sportsman's 
ear. A shot at a mallard is worth hours of waiting. But right 
here at home there's a sport with a thousand thrills— all yours for 
the seeking. Go out to your local club today and try 

TRAPSHOOTING 

Hundreds of gamey clay " birds " await your call. Each one a 
tantalizer — hurling away through the summer's air at express- train speed 
1 1 — dipping, dodging in ever- changing, mystifying angles. 

A few seconds to judge — a snap decision. Bang ! goes your gun ! 
Man, there are your thrills — and as fast as you care to take them. There 
is only one thing faster and that is 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

— good, old reliable time-proved powders. The choice of the Nation's crack shots. Look 
for the brand names, Dupont, Ballistite or Schultze on the shell box when you purchase. 

Write today for our free book "The Sport Alluring" and the name of your 
nearest gun club. 

Sporting Powder Division 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware. 



R 



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132 



THE GAME BREEDER 



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T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XV 



AUGUST, W9 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 5 



The Farmer and the Law. 

Farmers' organizations that attempt a 
co-operative business face uncertainty as 
to where they will stand under national 
and state anti-trust acts. In several 
states one bureau is urging the organiza- 
tion of co-operative associations while 
another department is threatening to out- 
law these combinations as being a re- 
straint to trade. In . New York, for in- 
stance, the Bureau of Markets encour- 
ages farmers to co-operate while at the 
same time the dairymen's league is 
threatened with prosecution. In nearly 
every particular the rapidly changing 
conditions resulting from the develop- 
ment of collective bargaining and co-op- 
erative marketing are complex and puz- 
zling and there has been no central clear- 
ing house to which farmers and legisla- 
tors could turn for the facts. 

The American Association for Agricul- 
tural Legislation has tackled this job of 
getting some sort of order out of the 
chaotic mass of laws and court decisions 
on the subject. This organization is 
made up of agricultural leaders, farmers 
and educators, and is modeled somewhat 
after the American Association for Labor 
Legislation, which has accomplished much 
good work. Under Dr. Liberty H. Bai- 
ley, of Cornell, as president and Rich- 
ard T. Ely, of Madison, Wisconsin, as 
secretary the association is rapidly organ- 
izing its work to cover questions of food 
production, land settlement, rural educa- 
tion, taxation, credits, roads and mar- 
kets Anyone interested may become a 
member. 

It might be supposed that some Fed- 
eral department should be charged with 



this duty of digesting and systematizing 
our medley of conflicting laws, but it is 
palpable that if anything is to be done, it 
must -be by a nonpartisan organization 
of agricultural leaders, such as are in- 
cluded in the membership of the Amer- 
ican Association for Agricultural Legisla- 
tion. This organization deserves sup- 
port.— The Country Gentleman. 

We shall support this association. 
Some years ago, when the "more game 
and fewer game laws" idea was proposed 
Dr. Bailey wrote to the editor of The 
Game Breeder a letter which was given 
wide publicity and which did much to ad- 
vance the "more game" cause. He said 
that our fundamental idea that the farm- 
ers' interests must be considered in our 
game law making was sound. Later he 
requested the editor to write the article 
on the game laws for his excellent en- 
cyclopedia of agriculture. 

There can be no doubt that laws con- 
cerning shooting on the farms should be 
made by the farmers who own the farms, 
and not by the sportsmen who can not 
enter them without permission The ab- 
surdity of sportsmen making the profit- 
able production of food on the farms a 
criminal offence long has been evident 
and soon the nonsense will be ended as it 
has been in some states. 

Death of a Game Farm. 

Edward T. Martin, in Hunter-Trader- 
Trapper, describes the "Mistakes in 
Game Farming," and the death of a 
state institution. 

The Game Farm of the State of California 
is dead and sleeping a dreamless sleep in the 
grave of oblivion. No child was ever born 
under prospects so fair as this same Game 



134 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Farm. The wealthy State of California its 
sire, an army of conservationists the land 
over, its sponsors, but also it was damned by 
every fish enthusiast in the state and this 
proved its undoing, helped as the fisher peo- 
ple were by many false economists who 
grudged a few thousand dollars taken from 
the money received for gunning licenses and 
used for the Farm's support. Money which 
otherwise would have been available for the 
planting of salmon and trout fry in places 
where the gulls, the crows, the irrigation 
ditches and the drought of a long dry season 
would make way with them by wholesale, all 
of which last mattered little to the politicians 
who were pulling trje wires because while their 
constituents saw the fish fry planted, few 
kept track as to whether they lived or died 
and the votes came when and where they were 
needed. 

Various Opinions. 

Discussing the varied opinions as to 
what should be done, Mr. Martin says: 

One thought it bad policy to raise wild 
turkeys. Perhaps it was, the kind of "wild" 
turkeys the experiment was being tried with. 
Into the discard they went, but not until a few 
lean coyotes had grown fat on the square 
meals those foolish birds supplied them, and 
in places the ranchers were able bodied allies 
of the coyotes. 

"Hungarian partridges?" said an employee 
of the Commission. "This isn't Hungary if 
these birds are," and they followed the 
turkeys. 

Wild Ducks. 

Then came the ducks. This looked like 
getting down to business. Some were grabbed 
from the wild, mostly netted around Lake 
Merritt in Oakland or from the banks of the 
shallow lakes down Fresno way. These last 
nearly all cinnamon teal. Then nests were 
robbed of their eggs in the nearby Alvarado 
marsh and the supply of ducks was run up 
from a single pair to at one time about 600. 

So far, so good, but they would not lay. 
Early in the game the mallards and a few 
teal started nobly and then backslid. Wood 
ducks, prolific layers and good breeders in 
the_ East, one and all became confirmed old 
maids. The other varieties acted like they 
had never seen an egg and didn't know what 
the word nest meant. Yet a local rancher but 
a few miles from the state farm "borrowed" 
a few mallard eggs from a nest in the wild; 
hired an old red hen to incubate them and 
started business this year with two ducks and 
a drake. 

While the State Farm with a flock number- 
ing several hundred was doing nothing — I do 
not believe that one of the scattering few that 
were hatched lived to reach maturity— this 
old man raised a flock of a dozen and sold 



them at a fair profit. Yet the only pond he 
had was a tin pan replenished night and morn- 
ing with pure water, which the ducks shared 
with the barnyard fowl. 



Too Much Publicity. 

Mr. Martin thinks that carting the 
game birds all over the state for exhi- 
bition purposes was bad and that the 
location of the duck pond also was bad. 
A public highway ran just outside of the 
duck pond fence. There was a constant 
tooting of horns and the head lights 
shone on the pond. "While the ducks 
didn't say so, it is certain they didn't 
like the auto parade a little bit. This 
fire business is something no wild bird 
or animal ever gets used to." 

Private Breeders Succeed. 

These and like things did much to keep the 
waterfowl from increasing, multiplying and 
replenishing the land. 

Macomber of Picones has a game farm in 
his own right and on his own land. He per- 
mits none of the annoyances the state birds 
were subject to nor does he stint on expenses. 
He keeps in all several thousand ducks, geese, 
pheasants, quail, partridges and I believe tur- 
keys, just to see them around. 

With private breeders all game has done 
well. Pheasants in particular have proved 
very profitable. It is hardly complimentary to 
the fish and game commission that they have 
made a failure while every other raiser of 
game, the rancher with his three ducks and 
dishpan pond, Macomber with his thousands 
of birds, the schoolboy wiith his pair of quail, 
have succeeded. Such alas is the case, and 
now our only hope is in a close season cover- 
ing a term of years. 

The Wrong Remedy. 

Mr. Martin well says : 

Those same people, though, are sincere in 
their desire to believe that game is on the 
increase, but fail to realize that thinking a 
thing is so does not make it so. "None so 
blind as those who won't see," and those who 
say that any sort of feathered game in Cali- 
fornia is even holding its own are fit for a 
post-graduate course at any institution for 
people who have lost their vision. 

We are quite sure that the fashionable 
remedy — a closed season — is not the 
right one, unless the law excepts indus- 
trious private breeders who are far more 
numerous in California than most people 
think they are. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



136 



Many Breeders in California. 

Nothwithstanding the statement in the 
California State report that the Commis- 
sion has failed to interest the people in 
game breeding and that "they seem to 
prefer poultry," it is a fact that many 
readers of The Game Breeder are suc- 
cessfully breeding pheasants, ducks, quail 
and other game birds in California. 

We have had no reports recently of 
anyone being arrested for any of the 
food-producing crimes (?) such a.s hav- 
ing birds or eggs in possession for breed- 
ing purposes, and although the shipping 
facilities may not be as good as they are 
in some of the free states, we are quite 
sure the California breeders will continue 
in business and that in time the game 
laws will catch up with their industry. 



Safe Arrival of Canvas Backs. 

One of our readers in Northern Can- 
ada recently shipped some Canvasbacks 
to another reader in California ; the birds 
arrived safely and, no doubt, will be 
properly looked after. 

In a short time game breeding will be- 
come such a common industry in Cali- 
fornia that no one will think of raiding 
game breeders, stealing their game in 
the name of the law, and fining or jail- 
ing the criminals who produce food. 

The California sportsmen, when they 
read the good stories about the abundant 
game and good shooting which we shall 
publish, will no doubt decide to patronize 
the game farmers and to become sport- 
ing breeders. 

It will not be long before the courts 
decide that game purchased or otherwise 
legally obtained by breeders does not be- 
long to the game politicians and that 
they must not interfere with a highly 
profitable and proper food producing in- 
dustry. 

The State does not own all the game. 
In many places in America there is far 
more game owned by game breeders than 
is owned by the State. The ratio of in- 
crease of the first named is geometrical 
and the State game is vanishing, as Mr. 
Martin and all other competent observers 
well know. 



Free Shooting. 

Mr. Barlow, advertising manager, in 
the Remington Live News notes, says : 

Free shooting and fishing must not be 
allowed to disappear, for directly thereon rest 
not only the health and happiness of thou- 
sands of our citizens, but in a large measure 
our national security. No one doubts that 
as a nation we must always depend upon the 
virility of our young manhood. 

The incentive to go afield being provided, 
some place to go must be furnished. The 
federal government, the States, associations, 
or philanthropic individuals should set aside 
at once as many public hunting preserves as 
possible. This duty is the duty of the State, 
but the State is an abstract term. It is up to 
the citizens to start the ball rolling. Marshes 
are being drained and thickets cleared to pro- 
vide more grain and incidentally more dollars 
to some individual. Now is the time to buy, 
while much territory can still be purchased at 
a small figure. Again, the question is not 
who shall provide, but the fact that some ter- 
ritory for public shooting and fishing must 
be provided. All interested should put their 
shoulders to the wheel and help. This does 
not mean simply sportsmen, but all Americans 
who wish to see our nation composed of 
strong, healthy men, who may be better able 
to withstand the duties of our "strenuous" 
life. 

This is good advice. There is plenty 
of room in the United States for big 
public shooting grounds, for game farms, 
state and commercial, and for all the 
game shooting clubs which the sportsmen 
may decide to organize. Many thou- 
sands of sportsmen now belong to one 
or more game shooting clubs, or syndi- 
cates, as they say in England, and all 
have excellent shooting every season for 
the very good reason that the game is 
properly looked after and is not eaten 
by vermin. 

Shooting Hotels. 

The Game Breeder also advocates an- 
other kind of free shooting, which is 
provided for sportsmen in the older 
countries. Country hotels should pro- 
vide shooting for their guests at reason- 
able rates on game preserves owned or 
leased by the hotels. It is an easy mat- 
ter to keep grouse, quail, pheasants, 
duck and other game abundant on pro- 
tected areas. At some of the hotels the 
guests are permitted to shoot a good lot 
of game. They can take a little of it 



136 



THE GAME BREEDER 



home or they can take a larger amount 
if they wish to pay for it. 

Another Excellent Plan. 

In some .of the continental countries 
of Europe the sportsmen of a village 
combine to rent the shooting and they 
all shoot a good lot of game. After the 
shoot abundant game is sold to pay the 
expenses, which consist of the small 
shooting rental and wages of the game 
keepers. The cheapest shooting, of 
course, is partridge, rabbit and hare 
shooting, since the game breeds abun- 
dantly in a wild state when protected 
from vermin. Game always is so plenti- 
ful that it sells for very little and the 
shooters pay for the game they take 
home. They all have excellent shooting 
and since the game they purchase at the 
end of the shoot is cheaper than poultry 
or meat the shooting really costs little 
or nothing. In other words, they stop 
a butcher's bill larger than the cost of 
their sport. 

An Important Matter. 

The important matter is that they 
shoot without exterminating the game. 
They, of course, shoot with the farmer's 
permission and the farmers are paid a 
little for the right to shoot, just as thou- 
sands of American farmers are paid by 
American sportsmen who conduct game 
shooting clubs. 

Any trap shooting club or game pro- 
tection society easily can form a game 
shooting club and have excellent and in- 
expensive shooting if the game is re- 
stored and properly looked after. Some 
of our game shooting clubs meet at a 
country hotel where they have a special 
rate for board and lodging, and where 
quail is the game shot the dues are very 
small since the quail breed abundantly 
in a wild state. 

Good Advice. 

The Game Conservation Society and 
The Game Breeder always are ready to 
advise sportsmen of generous behavior 
how to organize game shooting clubs 
and to deal fairly with the farmers. 
The advertisers in The Game Breeder 



supply stock birds and eggs, and when 
a little food is planted for the game and 
the cats and other vermin are not per- 
mitted to eat it, the shooting, of course, 
is excellent every season. We are al- 
ways glad to have sportsmen visit game 
shooting clubs, and the free shooting of- 
ten is excellent in the vicinity of a club 
where there is any wild or unoccupied 
land. 

Expensive Game. 

There can be no doubt that the pheas- 
ant is the most expensive game to pro- 
duce in America as it is in other coun- 
tries. Owen Jones was right in saying 
that partridge shooting will remain the 
most popular form of sport because it is 
cheap. 

Grouse and quail bred wild in pro- 
tected fields and woods can be produced 
abundantly far cheaper than hand-reared 
pheasants or even wild ducks are pro- 
duced. 

All capable state game officers admit 
that it is not possible to keep quail and 
grouse shooting open if no one looks 
after the birds and gives them proper 
protection. The state reports are filled 
with recommendations for closed seasons 
for a term of years, and usually it is 
deemed necessary to extend the term 
when it expires. The close tillage of 
the farms, no covers or foods being left 
for the game, is as fatal to upland game 
as the draining of marshes is to duck 
shooting. 

How state game officers can be ex- 
pected to provide even a half dozen 
pheasants for a gunner who pays one 
dollar is beyond our comprehension. No 
club with careful business management 
ever has been able to provide one pheas- 
ant for a dollar. It should be remem- 
bered always that club pheasants are 
not to a large extent eaten by vermin 
as state pheasants always are when lib- 
erated. 

(From the Buffalo Enquirer) 
Come to think of it, the majority of 
the League of Nations are "wet"' nations. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



137 



GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Theodore Rouau.lt, Jr. 



Mr. Rouault, of New Mexico, was one of 
advised closed seasons for terms of years for 
extermination, but he also favored game farmin 
of game preserves. The following articles on 
annual report before he retired from office, 
published by any State Department, he refers t 
seems to overlook the fact that the bird is al 
in many others besides Ohio. — 'Editor. 



the best State game officers in the country. He 
most species of game in order to prevent its 
g by the State and individuals and the creation 
Game Farms and Preserves are from his last 
In his excellent State report, one of the best 
o the bobwhite as "the Ohio song bird," but he 
so on the song bird list in his own State and 



Game farms are now being most suc- 
cessfully operated by game and fish de- 
partments of practically every state in 
the union, as well as by many individuals. 
The purpose of a state game farm being 
to raise, what might be termed, seed 
stock for distribution in those areas 
where there now exists a shortage of 
game birds or game animals. Such a 
farm could be operated by the game and 
fish department of this state under the 
direction of the state game warden and 
supervised by a superintendent. 

There is at present in New Mexico 
tracts of land owned by the state which 
beyond any doubt would make ideal 
game farm sites. At the present rate of 
depletion, it must be realized that it will 
soon be absolutely necessary for this 
state to own and operate such a farm 
in order to meet the wastage problem. 

Game farms have gone beyond the ex- 
perimental stage. They have proven 
their utility in practically all of the old- 
er states of the union. The federal gov- 
ernment has indicated its belief in this 
by setting aside large areas of valuable 
timbered land for the conservation of 
wild game. These national game ref- 
uges, such as Yellowstone Park, are 
nothing more than game farms on an 
immense scale. This only proves the 
statement that game farms are beyond 
the point of experimentation. 

The value of the game farm is that 
larsre numbers of game birds or game 
animals mav be produced annually and 
raised in captivity for liberation at the 
proner season of the year throughout 



those sections where there may exist a 
shortage, and which sections should be 
producing a fair portion of the meat 
supply. A game farm can be operated 
to greater advantage in the propagation 
of game birds than game animals, the 
former not requiring such large areas. 
For instance, turkey, pheasants, quail, 
grouse, prairie chicken, ducks, geese, etc., 
may be produced on a comparatively 
small acreage of well selected land. 

Wallace Evans this past year, I am 
informed, produced some 15,000 pheas- 
ants and several thousand waterfowl on 
a comparatively small acreage of land. 
The same may be said of W. J. Macken- 
sen of Yardley, Pennsylvania, and hun- 
dreds of other breeders throughout the 
United States. In fact there are today 
large numbers of game farms being 
started throughout this country. If 
these farms can be operated at a finan- 
cial success by the private individual, 
why should not the state also be able to 
do likewise with experienced assistants 
to carry on the work. Steps should be 
immediately taken for the selection and 
setting aside of a suitable tract of state 
land for a state game farm, regardless 
of whether it is placed in use this year 
or five years hence. The question is 
to make the start. With the number 
of game animals which this Department 
is in a position to confiscate annually 
from illegal keepers, it would only be a 
short period until a state game farm 
would be well supplied with a variety 
of game. 

Adequate laws should be passed by 



138 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the forthcoming legislature to license 
private game farms in this state, and 
they should be so construed as to en- 
courage the industry. A license fee of 
$10.00 per annum should be charged 
for each game farm permit, which 
permit would allow the purchase, impor- 
tation, propagation and sale of game ani- 
mals and game birds. It should also al- 
low him immunity from the state game 
and fish laws in every respect, except 
that he should abide by such rules and^ 
regulations as may be formulated from 
time to time by the state game and fish 
warden. 

Game Preserves. 

Game preserves are distinguished 
from game farms in that the former are 
usually immense tracts of wild timbered 
country, in this state usually mountain- 
ous, where wild game and birds are per- 
mitted to propagate unmolested and un- 
der natural conditions, and by close pro- 
tection against predatory animals, and 
constant policing against poachers, they 
increase rapidly in these preserves as 
compared to adjoining areas where this 
class of close protection is not given. 

The game preserve laws of this state 
are most liberal and a great number of 
the larger land holders have taken ad- 
vantage of the state's liberal policy by 
taking out game preserve licenses. These 
owners of game preserves are to be con- 
gratulated as they not only have assisted 
to protect and increase the game supply 
throughout their own large enclosed 
holdings, but also throughout the imme- 
diate surrounding country, as an exam- 
ple the finest and best deer and turkey 
shooting in this state is to be found in 
Colfax county, where there now exists 
and have existed for many years past 
large private game preserves, the over- 
flow of game from these preserves has 
naturally drifted out into the surround- 
ing country, and now affords splendid 
hunting to the average individual from 
town who can afford a week's trip into 
the hills for big game. This statement 
is admitted by all as being true, but the 
average citizen also believes that the 



preserve owners should be forced to ob- 
serve the same seasons and bag limits 
as he. There has been some feeling 
aroused over this situation in some lo- 
calities. In my opinion, this should not 
be. I know of my own personal knowl- 
edge that the owners of these preserves 
are observing the open season, but possi- 
bly not the bag limit. On the latter 
point, I am not advised. It must also 
be admitted that inasmuch as the men 
who control these large areas are pay- 
ing heavy taxes, not only on the lands, 
but also on extensive improvements and 
that they have further paid the neces- 
sary license fee and are also paying their 
own game warden for policing the prop- 
erty out of their own purse, and most 
.certainly helping to a great extent to re- 
stock the surrounding country by the 
overflow from their protected properties. 
For these reasons, if none other, they 
should be granted certain special priv- 
ileges as now provided by our laws if 
they are not detrimental to the game and 
they remain within their rights as grant- 
ed them by their game preserve licenses. 
Personally I am heartily in favor of 
game preserves, and the more the bet- 
ter, not only on account of the increase 
of game but also that it may give the 
ordinary once-a-year hunter an oppor- 
tunity to bag his deer or turkey from 
the overflow which is constantly leaving 
these preserves. I am more than will- 
ing to give the game preserves full credit 
for the abundance of game which occurs 
in those counties where a large number 
of such preserves are now located. I 
mention particularly Colfax, Taos, 
Union and Rio Arriba counties. 

The following game preserve owners 
are directly responsible for the protec- 
tion which, has been given to the big game 
supply of their respective sections, and 
throughout which sections will be found 
a most satisfactory increase : 

The Bartlett Ranch of Vermejo, which 
covers portions of Colfax and Taos 
counties, and is composed of several hun- 
dred thousand acres, is one of the larg- 
est and best protected preserves in the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



139 



state. The last figures which were re- 
ceived from there and which were com- 
piled after a great deal of investigation, 
as well as painstaking observations, in- 
dicate that there are now ranging on this 
tract of land one hundred and fifty elk, 
twenty-five hundred deer, a great many 
bear and several thousand turkey. This 
ranch is posted against all trespassers, as 
well as being under the observation of 
two or three paid game wardens em- 
ployed by the Bartlett Ranch. 

Another very extensive tract is the 
Springer Ranch, which is the refuge for 
a large number of deer, bear, turkey, etc. 
This concern also employs a paid man 
to protect their game interests. 

The George Webster Ranch also con- 
taining a very large acreage is well 
stocked with elk, deer, bear and turkey. 

The Stern Land and Cattle Company's 
holdings are also large and very well 
stocked. 

Likewise the same may be said of the 
William H. Smith Ranch near Brilliant, 
New Mexico. 

These five large cattle ranches adjoin 
one another and probably cover 750,000 
acres or more, therefore it can be seen 
that it is nothing less than an immense 
game preserve, composed of high, rough 
and heavily timbered mountains, low 
rolling foot hills, and hundreds of small 
well watered valleys. The topographical 
arrangement is indeed excellent, and the 
climatic conditions certainly cannot be 
surpassed, therefore it can only be said 
that it is an ideal game preserve. 

The Bell Ranch of San Miguel Coun- 
ty is also another large and well pro- 
tected game preserve. On their range 
may be found today what is probably 
the largest single herd of antelope in 
this country, numbering between five an<?. 
six hundred head. Their game reports 
also indicate that approximately 3,500 
deer are ranging within their fence. 

George A. Fowler of Union County 
also controls a game preserve of 60,000 
acres, on which a great number of deer, 
some antelope, and other small game now 



ranges, and of which he is taking ex- 
ceedingly good care. 

Messrs. McNary and Lee, as well as 
Cadwallador and Harvey, owners of 
large tracts of cattle range under fence 
on the crest of the Sacramento moun- 
tains, have also been recently granted 
game preserve licenses and have taken 
active steps to increase the game supply 
of that section by the proper policing 
of their large holdings from poachers. A 
further and chief reason why these large 
land holders and cattle owners have ta- 
ken advantage of the game preserve law 
is the fact that in this manner they have 
been able to protect their cattle from be- 
ing shot by careless hunters and. inexpe- 
rienced guides. It has also placed them in 
a position whereby they could protect 
their pastures and timber from destruc- 
tion by fire generally caused by reckless 
campers. I believe that all fair minded 
people will agree that these "game pro- 
tectionists'' are entitled to this protec- 
tion. 



A Wise Remark. 



Air. MacVicar made a wise remark 
when he said, "Where there is free shoot- 
ing it usually means no shooting at all." 
It is true, however, that where game 
farms and game shooting clubs are nu- 
merous often there is some very good 
free shooting in the neighborhood. Mr. 
Rouault pointed this out in his report as 
state game officer. We became convert- 
ed to the "more game and fewer game 
laws" plan when we found some free 
shooting quite near New York. 



We know many places where the 
sportsmen can shoot many more than one 
quail for a dollar and they often take a 
few ruffed grouse and rabbits for good 
measure. This can be done in the song 
bird states if those who wish to have 
inexpensive quail shooting be permitted 
to do so. It is unfortunate that state 
officers are obliged to advise closed sea- 
sons as they do in their annual reports. 



140 



THE GAME BREEDER 



LAND FOR RETURNING SOLDIERS. 



F. W. Wilson 



There should be a large volume of ex- 
plosives trade in prospect for Du Pont 
dealers arising out of the ''Land for Re- 
turning Soldiers" movement, which has 
been set on foot by the United States De- 
partment of the Interior. 

Secretary Lane of the department 
started the movement by his letter to 
President Wilson, dated May 31, 1918. 
In it he stated that he thought the time 
had come when the country should give 
careful consideration to the preparation 
of plans for providing employment for- 
our soldiers returning from the war. 

In May their return was merely a 
somewhat dim prospect. Now it is a 
present and pressing reality. Thousands 
of soldiers in training in the United 
States are, at the time of writing, being 
demobilized and sent to their homes. It 
is just as important to provide these men 
with employment as those coming back 
from Europe. 

It would seem as though the vast in- 
dustrial army who were engaged in vari- 
ous branches of munition or war sup- 
plies manufacture should be considered 
as well as the soldiers in uniform. They, 
too, will be as badly in need of employ- 
ment and as deserving of government aid 
as the men who wore the khaki. 

It was Secretary Lane's idea as ex- 
pressed to the President that soldiers de- 
siring to take up farming as an occupa- 
tion should be provided with the means 
whereby they could become the owners 
of raw land that could in the course of 
time be converted into fertile farms. 

The secretary pointed out that there 
were millions of acres of unappropriated 
land in the United States suitable for the 
purpose under consideration. An artic 1 e 
in the Scientific American of November 
9, 1918, contains tables showing the num- 
ber of acres of stump land and the num- 
ber of acres of swamp land respectively 



in the various states of the United- States 
as follows, 

Acres ^ Acres 

State Stump Land Swamp Land 

Acres Acres 

State Stump Land Swamp Land 

Alabama' 14,785,000 1,479,200 

Arkansas 13,893,000 5,912,300 

California 3,031,000 3,420,000 

Connecticut 30,000 

Delaware 127,200 

Florida 10,109,000 19,800,000 

Georgia 20,141,000 2,700,000 

llinois 925,000 

Idaho 676,000 

Indiana 625,000 

Iowa 930,000 

Kansas 359,380 

Kentucky 3,222,000 444,600 

Louisiana 11,877,000 10,196,605 

Maine 6,135,000 156,520 

Maryland 1,848,000 192,000 

Massachusetts 59,500 

Michigan 11,686,000 2,947,439 

Minnesota 14,022,000 5,832,308 

Mississippi 13,203,000 5,760,200 

Miissouri 8,900,000 2,439,600 

Montana 674,000 

Nebraska .'. 512,100 

New Hampshire .... 2,608,000 12,700 

New Jersey 1,151,000 326,400 

New York 5,997,000 529,100 

North Carolina ■ 12,745,00 2,748,160 

North Dakota 200,000 

Ohio 155,047 

Oklahoma 31,500 

Oregon 3,537,000 254,000 

Pennsylvania 5,297,000 50,000 

Rhode Island ' 8,046 

South Carolina 8,994,000 3,122,120 

South Dakota ..A 611,480 

Tennessee 7,833,000 639,600 

Texas 12,936,000 2,240,000 

Vermont 2,070,000 23,000 

Virginia 9,929,000 800,000 

Washington 3,330,000 20,500 

West Virginia 4,634,000 23,900 

Wisconsin 13,246,000 2,360,000 

Total 228,509,000 79,005,023 

In the opinion of Secretary Lane, 
about half of the uncleared stump land 

and undrained swamp land could be 

cleared and drained and made cultivable. 
He also made reference to the arid 
lands in the west, many thousands of 

acres of which could be taken in hand bv 



THE GAME BREEDER 



141 



the reclamation service, and by irrigation 
made available for this purpose. 

Every dealer in Du Pont explosives 
should get behind this movement and 
push. It is a splendid thing for the coun- 
try, because its consummation will ward 
off the spread of discontent and possibly 
something worse in labor circles. It is a 
good thing for the various states, because 
it will develop their resources, increase 
their trade, their bank reserves, and add 
to their general prosperity. It is a good 
thing for the soldiers, because it will 
make property owners of them with a 
definite interest in a business of their 



own, and every political economist rec- 
ognizes this to be a very desirable condi- 
tion. It reduces the volume of floating, 
unattached labor, and it makes the coun- 
try less liable to upheaval in time of in- 
dustrial depression. 

There is good profit in the sale of 
dynamite and blasting supplies, as many 
of the dealers in the cut-over land re- 
gions of Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michi- 
gan, Oregon, Washington, Idaho and 
other localities can testify. 

[All of the swamp lands should be used for 
breeding wild fowl. Wild ducks are the best 
game birds for beginners. — Editor.] 



THE 10TH CAT AND THREE BROODS OF QUAIL. 

By the Editor. 



Nine cats of various sizes and colors 
had fallen to the game keeper's gun as 
they came to the rearing fields of the 
Long Island Game Breeders Association. 
The little 20-gauge Parker gun had 
spoken nine times effectively and the cats 
went to the happy hunting ground be- 
fore they had a chance to eat any of 
the young quail and pheasants. 

Some of the cats were big wild cats 
from the woods, which evidently had no 
owner; others were cats of more refine- 
ment which, no doubt, lived part of the 
time, at least, in houses. There were 
yellow cats, gray cats, black cats and 
parti-colored cats of high and low de- 
gree. 

The heads and tails of the wilder 
specimens were tacked on the end of 
the food house, used as a vermin rack ; 
the milder mannered cats were buried 
out of sight for reasons well known to 
game keepers who wish to avoid con- 
troversies. 

Three big broods of quail, one each 
of Gambels, Scaled and Bobwhite quail 
(between 40 and 50 birds) were in the 
quail nursery with their bantam foster 



mothers. The little birds ran about in* 
side the wire fenders before the coops. 
They were a week or ten days old and 
all of them were healthy and active. I 
had planned to move these three broods 
to the kitchen garden near the house in 
order to ascertain what garden insects 
and weed seeds the little quail preferred. 
A few of the birds were to have been 
killed in order to have examinations 
made of their stomach contents. 

Our neighbor was known to have a 
cat. He had it last year when it was 
quite young. But since over a hundred 
quail had been successfully reared in 
the garden last season, we decided to 
take a chance on the tenth cat. There 
was good reason for sparing its life. 
About a hundred of our young mallards 
recently had raided our neighbor's onion 
patch and he had called to comp!ain 
about them in a friendly way, and it 
seemed to be hardly fair to slaughter his 
little black cat on suspicion. 

The quail were moved to the garden. 
But in an evil moment when the keeper 
was engaged in the rearing field with his 
pheasants the little black cat got busy. 



142 



THE GAME BREEDER 



How many quail were actually killed we 
■do not know ; some, no doubt, escaped to 
the asparagus beds and the tall weeds in 
the garden, but the St. Swithin's rain 
immediately was ushered in with a heavy 
shower; it rained for five days with lit- 
tle intermission and the little birds which 
escaped probably perished since none re- 
turned to the bantams. 

The game keeper when he observed 

the cat quickly went after it with the 

< gun, but our neigbbor appeared on the 

scene and it was deemed wise not to 



inflict the death penalty. A promise 
was made that the cat would be locked 
up for the rest of the season. We had 
run a wire about our young ducks. For- 
tunately we had many more young quail 
and many eggs set under bantams. A 
new line of coops has been placed in the 
garden and last Sunday I enjoyed ob- 
serving the young quail darting about in 
the weeds in pursuit of insects, and run- 
ning in and out of the coops to have a 
little chat with their foster mothers. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



King Birds. 

A number of King birds nested in the 
orchard which adjoins the rearing fields 
of the Long Island Association. Across 
the road to the north there are numer- 
ous crows which often make excursions 
to the preserve but the little King birds 
go aloft as soon as the black enemies 
come in sight and it is interesting to see 
how quickly they drive the crows away. 

Upon several occasions I have ob- . 
served' the encounters. As the little birds 
struck their enemies the crows croaked 
at each blow and made haste to return 
to their wood the King birds following 
and striking them until they were out of 
sight. Never, so far as we know, has a 
crow been permitted to visit the rearing 
fields or do any damage to the young 
quail, pheasants and ducks. The crow as 
all game preservers know, is an early 
hunter. He sets out at daybreak and 
hunts silently. But the King bird also is 
awake and on guard at the first signs of 
dawn and the martins are soon in the air 
ready to drive away their enemies. 

The fields are guarded on two sides by 
numerous dogs which live in kennels 
strategetically placed. The dogs are held 
by long chains which rattle when they 
rush out of their kennels and the numer- 
ous foxes and other ground enemies 
have had no chance to dine on game. 



Very little vermin of any kind, except- 
ing cats and snakes, has been killed and 
there have been very few losses due to 
vermin. The hawks secured only one 
pheasant and, like the crows, seldom they 
are seen near the game. 



A Call for Notes. 

We wish many of our readers would 
write a few lines telling us about their 
good and bad luck during the breeding 
season. The reports which are beginning 
to come in indicate that this will be by 
far the biggest and most successful sea- 
son since the "more game and fewer 
game laws" idea was promulgated. 

We know how busy all game breeders 
are at this season but it only takes a few 
.minutes in the evening to record some of 
the astonishing things which happen and 
we are quite sure the notes of actual 
occurrences are more interesting than 
anything else which appears in the mag- 
azine, not even excepting the advertise- 
ments. 



Market Prices. 

All indications are that the prices for 
quail, pheasants, clucks and other game 
birds will be higher this year than ever 
before. We are aware that there are 
many more thousands of birds than there 



THE GAME BREEDER 



143 



were last season but we also are aware 
that many new game-shooting clubs have 
been formed; many owners of country 
places have decided that it is a good 
plan to have some game for sport and 
for food, and hundreds of new breeders, 
who breed and sell game for propagation 
purposes, are going into the new indus- 
try. Although some purchase only a few 
dozen birds, intending to start in a small 
way, there are others who have had suf- 
ficient experience to know that game 
farming is profitable and who have de- 
cided they can make more money if they 
have more stock birds. We advise all 
purchasers that they can buy more 
cheaply in September and October than 
they can later. Many breeders will sell 
some of their birds (in order to raise 
a little money) at a lower price than they 
will expect to get later. As the breeding 
season again approaches the prices will 
be twice what they will be in September 
and we predict the September market 
will open with the prices well up. 

Those who have their advertisements 
in early or who keep them standing by 
the year will surely sell all their birds. 
A few unwise breeders who did not ad- 
vertise last season wrote asking if we 
knew anyone who wanted birds. Our 
advice in such cases usually is that the 
improvident sell at a cut price to our 
advertisers who are equipped to place all 
the game offered and who should be paid 
for doing so. 

It would not seem fair and it certainly 
is not businesslike for the publication to 
put its time, stationery and postage try- 
ing to sell birds for people who forget to 
send early notices that they have birds 
to sell. 

New Customers. 

The Game Breeder goes to scores of 
new people each month who write to say 
they are interested in game breeding 
either for sport or for profit. 

During the war many people either 
were abroad or too busy at home to think 
about creating game farms or preserves. 
As we expected, there has been a great 
interest in the new industry since the 



war ended. Returning soldiers have 
called at the office to subscribe for The 
Game Breeder and to say that they pro- 
posed to have some game. There are 
repeated inquiries from the owners of 
country places who seem to be aware of 
the desirability of having "more game 
and fewer game laws" on the farm. We 
are especially interested in the projects 
of sportsmen who drop in to ask advice 
about the formation of game shooting 
clubs. ■ All of these must have game to 
introduce since on many of the farms 
there is absolutely nothing to shoot. 

Buckwheat. 

It is well known that quail are fond of 
buckwheat but buckwheat makes a very 
poor cover and on this account I believe 
our bobwhite is even more partial to 
wheat stubbles which often are full of 
rag-weed and are excellent cover. The 
seeds of the rag-weed are eaten even 
more abundantly than the fallen wheat 
probably because the seeds are more 
plentiful than the grain. The gray part- 
ridges of Europe (often called Hun- 
garian partridges since many of our im- 
ported birds come from that country) 
also are fond of buckwheat and since 
this grain will grow in almost any soil 
it often is planted for the gray partridges 
in England. 

Captain Maxwell in his book on the 
partridges says it is not a bad plan to 
sow a few strips of Hungarian millet in 
the same field ; this makes good cover 
which buckwheat does not. Where spe- 
cial plantings are made in order to hold 
the quail evenly distributed it is an ex- 
cellent plan to plant the strips of buck- 
wheat and millet adjacent to briar 
patches where these occur and a very 
attractive and safe feding ground can be 
made by planting borders of wild roses 
and blackberries at the sides of the strips 
of buckwheat. 

Long Island Quail. 

The quail shooting promises to be ex- 
cellent on Long Island, New York, not 
only on the club grounds but every- 



144 



THE GAME BREEDER 



where. There are, also, many ruffed 
grouse and rabbits and some of the clubs 
have deer. 

Deer Shooting. 

It seemed a pity to put an end to the 
free shooting of deer on Long Island, 
but it was quite necessary to do so. The 
death rate of the free shooters and by- 
standers was growing and promised to 
exceed that of the quarry so that there 
was no alternative. Populous farming 
regions are not proper places for deer. 

Quail Eggs Profitable. 

Experiments made by the Massachu- 
setts ^commissioners, by the Audubon 
Association, the Long Island Game 
Breeders Association and other game 
shooting clubs and game farmers all 
prove that penned quail lay numerous 
eggs. As many as one hundred eggs 
have been laid by a hen quail in cap- 
tivity but the average at the Sandwich 
bird farm, according to the last report, 
was 22+. A better average than this 
has been obtained by other breeders. 

Quail eggs sell readily for four or 
five dollars per dozen and better prices 
have been obtained for small lots. The 
price for adult quail is now from $18 
to $24 per dozen. Gambels quail and 
Scaled quail sell readily for $15 per 
dozen. 

It is evident that if a $2 bird will pro- 
duce a dozen eggs worth four or five dol- 
lars and some additional eggs, which can 
be hatched by bantams or by quail, that 
the breeding of quail is a highly profit- 
able industry. 

The birds are smaller eaters than 
pheasants, duck and other game birds, 
and they thrive in much smaller en- 
closures than those required for pheas- 
ants. Many quail can be reared in a 
garden. 

There is a bigger demand for quail 
and quail eggs than for any other game 
birds or eggs ; a breeder will always 
have more orders than he can fill. 

The California valley and mountain 
quail are as profitable as the others, and 



the Mearns or Massena quail will be 
even more so as soon as stock birds can 
be procured. This will not be very long. 
We expect soon to be able to inform 
readers of The Game Breeder where 
they can purchase the interesting spotted 
quail which we are sure will become pop- 
ular both as aviary and sporting birds, 
provided the experiments with these 
birds indicate that they can be acclima- 
tized in the northern states. We feel 
sure they will do well in the south and,, 
of course, they will thrive in Texas, 
New Mexico and Arizona, where they 
formerly occurred in good numbers. 
Some of our southwestern members have 
a rare opportunity to make a big lot of 
money breeding quail. 

The Breeding Season. 

All game breeders take much interest 
in the weather reports during the breed- 
ing season. Wild ducks, the easiest 
game birds to raise, do not mind the 
rain after they are a few weeks old and 
hand-reared birds can be shut up during 
cold rain and hail storms which are 
most disastrous to all young birds. 

Pheasants can be confined in their 
coops part of the time at least during 
cold rainy weather and they can be lib- 
erated between showers. They will 
thrive better if the weather be fine with 
only occasional summer showers which 
keep the young grass green and which- 
seem to bring out more insects. 

Wild nesting partridges in the older 
countries and our quail and grouse in 
America are affected more by the weath- 
er than the oheasants and ducks. Long 
cold rains just at the time the young 
ouail and grouse are hatched decimate 
the broods and exterminate many of 
them. This accounts for many broods of 
very small- birds at the opening of the 
shootinsr since the quail often nest a sec- 
ond time when the first brood is de- 
stroyed. 

Quail were nesting abundantly and' 
were just hatching their young broods 
on the preserve of the Long Island As- 
sociation when a rain storm came which- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



J 45 



lasted a good part of five days. Many 
of the quail nested in places where food 
is plentiful and it was not necessary for 
them to move about much. Fortunately 
the rain was a warm one without heavy 
winds. It will be easy to determine a 
little later what effect the storm had 
on the game. It is probable that there 
were some losses but that many birds 
survived. Had the long rain been a cold 
one, accompanied with high winds and 
hail, there would have been a big loss 
of young quail. 

Possibly some shelters erected in briar 
patches and provided with food, grit and 
dusting places would save a lot of young 
birds. 

Casualties 
At the Long Island Game Breeders 
Association. 

Nine cats, some of heroic size, fell 
dead on the field (for pheasants and 
quail) and several were seriously 
wounded. 

The cow broke loose and stepped on 
a young mallard, killing it instantly. This 
was practically the only wild duck fa- 
tality. 

Grasshoppers, needed as a food supply 
for the beneficial hawks, are so scarce 
that a pigeon hawk was obliged to take 
a young pheasant from the rearing field. 
He dropped it when the keeper tossed his 
hat at him. The young pheasant was 
alive when picked up and carried to the 
field hospital, but the wounds made by 
the hawk's talons proved fatal. This 
was the only loss due to hawks and 
crows. 

All the rats on the place are dead. 
There were many hundreds of them but 
not a single one survived the war of 
1919. Mice ditto. 

Several snakes have gone to the happy 
hunting ground, if snakes go there. Their 
earthly remains are in evidence, tacked 
up with a lot of cat's heads and hawk 
wings as ornaments for one end of the 
food house. 

Wild Ducks. 

Nine wild ducks after contributing 



many eggs which were set under hens 
stole away and nested in the grass by a 
fence festooned with grapes. All 
brought off fine broods of young ducks, 
excepting two black ducks whose eggs 
were not fertile. There were no losses 
due to foxes, weasels, rats, hawks, 
crows or other vermin, the only casualty 
being the one duck lost to the cow, 
and one pheasant. 

This speaks well for the quiet of the 
place. The truth of the matter is vermin 
has become scarce and wild. The re- 
sult is large numbers of wild breeding 
and hand-reared quail, hundreds of 
pheasants and wild ducks. 

Quail. 

A number of bob-whites, scaled quail 
and Gambel's quail died in the aviaries 
where they laid numerous eggs. The 
birds arrived in a blizzard, before the 
keeper was on the ground, and some 
were too weak to survive the long jour- 
ney from Mexico and the want of proper 
care upon their arrival. 

Pheasants. 

A few young pheasants died natural 
deaths in the rearing field when quite 
young, but the percentage was very 
small, too small in fact to be noticed. A 
healthy brood can be seen at every coop, 
many without the loss of a single bird. 
Considering the fact that many of the 
birds were hatched from eggs which 
came from other states the losses were 
surprisingly small. 

A very few of the young hand-reared 
quail have died ; but many of the birds 
have not passed the danger point. The 
appearance of the young Gambels, 
scaled quail and bobwhites, however, 
suggests that the losses will be very 
small. The loss of old birds in the 
aviaries exceeds that of the young which 
is unusual. 

Wild Breeding Quail. 

There was only a little game left after 
the shooting at the Long Island Game 
Breeders' Association last season, com- 



146 



THE GAME BREEDER 



paratively little game was reared last 
year due to a late start. But the wild 
nesting quail seem to be plentiful. The 
cock birds were heard last week whist- 
ling on every fence and many birds were 
seen flying about. Some came to feed 
in the rearing field for pheasants. Hun- 
dreds of pheasants and wild ducks are 
being reared this season. 

Cheap Shooting. 

Since the expense of producing a good 
lot of game was increased it was decided 
to add a few members to the list of the 
Long Island Game Breeders' Associa- 
tion. Sportsmen recommended by a 
member are eligible and can be sure of 
some good shooting next fall at three 
species of quail and pheasants and wild 
ducks. Dues are $1.00 per week. 

New Places. 

The many new game farms and game 
shooting clubs which are being started 
will undoubtedly purchase a big lot of 
game. We are often consulted by farm- 
ers and owners of country places who 
contemplate getting into the new indus- 
try either for sport or for profit. Al- 
though several times as much game un- 
doubtedly has been produced this sea- 
son as was produced last year we predict 
all of it will be sold before the next 
breeding season opens. 

Good Purchasers. 

The State game departments were big 
purchasers last year and they will pur- 
chase more extensively this year since 
they realize it is quite important to have 
some game on the lands which are open 
to the public. To supply hundreds of 
thousands of sportsmen with two or 
three birds each requires a vast amount 
of game and the State game when liber- 
ated is subject to more serious losses to 
vermin than the game is on club grounds 
where the keeper's gun and traps reduce 
the number of game enemies. The 
amount of game produced at the State 
game farms will only provide one or two 
birds for each hundred guns if there be 



no losses to vermin, so that it is fortu- 
nate that the commercial breeders can 
supply the departments with many thou- 
sands of pheasants. 

Some very big commercial farms soon 
will be started in the Central States in 
places where the natural foods and 
covers are excellent. 

We are beginning to take a great in- 
terest in the new game shooting clubs 
and the game farms. It is highly import- 
ant that the last named have plenty of 
shooting customers in order to keep the 
business good. 

Chicks Hatched by Steam. 

Believing they could hatch chickens 
without the use of a hen or incubator, 
pump-men in a Shamokin, Pa., colliery 
placed 18 eggs in a cotton filled box be- 
. neath the even-tempered steam pipes. 
Twelve chickens was the result. 

Some of our older readers will remem- 
ber that the late Mr. Blanton, one of the 
pioneers in breeding and selling wild tur- 
keys, hatched a brood of these birds in 
his hotel room, using the electric light 
for an incubator. 

Trying It Out. 

"Taking a glass of water, Colonel?" 
"Just experimenting a trifle," said the 
Colonel genially. "I may have to drink 
it as a beverage later on." — From the 
Louisville Courier- Journal. 

A Contrast. 

After spending a few days at the 
farms of the Long Island Game Breed- 
ers' Association, we were more con- 
vinced than ever before that it is far 
more interesting to produce "more game" 
than, it is to go> after more game laws. 
It is fully as easy to get the first named 
as it is to secure the other commodity. 
We wish some of the protective sports- 
men who have the greatest appetite for 
legislation could see the shooting and the 
eating of quail, pheasants and ducks 
which surely will take place next, fall. 
We honestly believe they would quit the 
pursuit of more laws, purchase some set- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



147 



ters and pointers and go in for more 
game. 

We hope to be able to invite some 
sportsmen from other regions to try the 
good shooting on Long Island in order 
that they may learn how easily the thing 
is done and that they may return home 
and form new shooting clubs. They will 
become customers of the game farmers 
whose products always are advertised in 
The Game Breeder. They will purchase 
guns, ammunition and dogs. Game is 
becoming abundant so rapidly that it 
soon will be necessary for the game 
farmers to have more shooting custom- 
ers. Those who advertise report excel- 
lent results. It is the aim of The Game 
Breeder to keep up the supply of good 
customers as the industry assumes large 
proportions. 

» 

Sportsmen Buy Preserve in Adiron- 
dacks. 

The famous Low estate in the Adiron- 
dacks, known as the Lake Marian pre- 
serve, has just been sold to a club to be 
used as a hunting and fishing park. The 
club, to be known as the Lake Marian 
Association, Inc., has a very small mem- 
bership, but includes such well known 
people as Winant Vanderpool and P. H. 
B. Freylinghuysen of Morristown, N. J., 
Paul Moore and George Plumer Smith 
of Convent, N. J., Bradford Brinton of 
Dickson, 111., and A. A. Low of New 
York City. 

The tract which the club has purchased 
is 11,600 acres in extent and includes sev- 
eral mountains, vast stretches of forest 
abounding in deer, and nine lakes among 
which some of the best known are Lake 
Marian, Colvin and Panther. 

Lake Marian, known to old timers as 
Silver Lake, is probably the most famous 
lake in this section of the country, both 
for its exceptional beauty and for its re- 
markable fishing. One of the most ex- 
traordinary things about the lake is that, 
although it has never been stocked, the 
fishing is as good today as it was thirty 
years ago, and then as now is was ex- 
cellent. 



It is not in the least unusual to catch a 
good number of brook trout in an hour 
on the fly in its waters. Colvin pond was 
discovered in 1873 by Verplank Colvin 
on his first exploration and survey of the 
Adirondacks. It is high up on the top of 
a mountain and is a very beautiful pond. 
Years ago it was stocked with Ouan- 
aniche (land-locked salmon) which in 
this lake attain a size of seven pounds. 

The Lake Marian Club is connected 
with Horse Shoe, which is on the Ad- 
irondack division of the New York Cen- 
tral, by a private road over the Low es- 
tate, and may also be reached by motor 
from outside points via Long Lake west 
over another private road. — Sportsman's 
Review. 



Quail and Pheasants. 

The Game Breeder. 

In the May number of The Game 
Breeder you ask the readers who have 
pheasants and quail what they think 
about them running together. I will say 
that I have ring neck pheasants and bob 
white quail in the same pen and they 
never fight. They lay in the same nest. 
I have a ring neck pheasant setting now 
on six pheasant eggs and eight quail eggs. 
However when the eggs hatch they will 
have to be separated. 

I would like for you to give the ad- 
dress of some one who has ruffed grouse 
for sale. 

Jack Holland. 

Texas. 

The only Ruffed Grouse dealer was arrested 
so often that we understand he quit. The 
New York markets probably will be supplied 
with imported black cock and the cats only 
will be permitted to have American grouse. 
Rapidly these birds are going on the song bird 
list. Connecticut is the latest State to approve 
this notion. We believe the game shooting 
clubs and preserve owners will continue to 
shoot the grouse they own, but the shipping 
facilities are so bad that none of them cares 
to ship any grouse. 

P. S. — -Since writing the above we have 
heard of a ruffed grouse game farm which is 
starting. It surely will make a lot of money. 
It will be announced in The Game Breeder 
later. — Editor. 



148 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Bounty Figures Are Shown. 

Joseph Kalbfus, secretary of the Penn- 
sylvania game commission, writes : 

"It will be of interest to you to know 
the result of our bounty work during the 
last fiscal year, June 1, 1918, to May 31, 
1919, inclusive, which has just been tab- 
ulated, and as a matter of comparison, 
give you below data on this work for the 
four years we have been operating the 
bounty division. 

"The year 1915, as below listed, in- 
cludes the animals killed and presented 
from April 15, 1915, up to May 31, 1916, 
inclusive, and the remaining years given 
are the fiscal years from June to June. 
This data complete being as follows : 

"Animals presented : 

1915 1916 1917 1918 

Wild Cats 792 432 297 459 

Gray Foxes ... 4,748 3,758 3,287 4,446 

Red Foxes 4,911 3,360 2,790 4,351 

Minks 4,014 6,022 4,248 5,549 

Weasels 28,225 44,631 30,397 31,944 

Bounty $56,309 $67,481 $48,581 $57,841 

"Under the new bounty act which be- 
came effective June 1st, as you have al- 
ready been advised, all skins no matter 
before what official presented, must come 
to this office without mutilation. The 
bounty on the wild cat has been increased 
two dollars and on the weasel one dollar 
so that this next year the amount of 
money required for this purpose will no 
doubt be approximately $35,000 more 
than during the present year, because of 
the increase in the county and the addi- 
tional interest that will be created in the 
killing of these animals. 

"It occurred to us that this data would 
be of considerable interest to your sports- 
men readers. — In the Open. 



killing and possessing one robin in vio- 
lation of the act. 

Judge Trieber in 1914 in the case of 
the United States against Harvey C. 
Shauver, decided that the migratory-bird 
law approved March 4, 1913, was un- 
constitutional. The present law repealed 
the act of 1913. 



Federal Migratory Bird Law Held 
Constitutional. 

The constitutionality of the federal 
migratory-bird treaty act approved July 
3, 1918, is upheld in an opinion rendered 
by Federal Judge Jacob Trieber of the 
eastern district of Arkansas in the case 
of United States against E. D. Thomp- 
son, of Memphis, Tenn., charged with 



Sage Cock. 

Young birds of the year that have fed 
largely on grasshoppers and other insects 
are regarded as being a choice food, and 
are esteemed as highly as the ruffed 
grouse or bobwhite. 

That the young are quite as good as 
any game bird in the land was proven to 
me by the delicious repast set before me 
by some of the good people of this arid 
country — T. Gilbert Pearson, in Bird 
Lore. 

You are quite right, Professor. We have 
shot and eaten hundreds of these birds. Why 
not suggest some good big sage cock ranches 
where the birds can be produced inexpensively 
and sold reasonably to a delighted people 
after they have afforded the excellent sport 
you no doubt are familiar with? — Editor. 



The Dove. 

Our dove is an excellent game bird. 
It is bred abundantly in the northern 
states to be shot when it goes south 
where the people know a good thing 
when they see it. 

Audubon says : "The flesh of these 
birds is remarkably fine, when they are 
obtained young and in the proper season. 
Such birds become extremely fat, are 
tender and juicy and in flavor equal in 
the estimation of some of my friends, as 
well as in my own, to that of the snipe or 
even the woodcock; but as taste in such 
matters depends much on circumstances, 
and perhaps on the whim of individuals, 
I would adivse you, reader, to try for 
yourself. These birds require good 
shooting to bring them down, when on 
wing, for they fly with great swiftness, 
and not always in a direct manner. It is 
seldom that more than one can be killed 
at a shot when they are flying, and rarely 



THE GAME BREEDER 



149 



more than two or three when on the 
ground on account of their natural pro- 
pensity to keep apart. 

"When raised from the nest, they are 
easily tamed. I have even known some 
instances of their breeding in confine- 
ment. When caught in traps and cooped 
they feed freely, and soon become fat, 
when they are excellent for the table." 



Our Correspondence. 

We have found it impossible to handle 
our correspondence politely. The numer- 
ous requests for information about 
starting new game shooting clubs ; the 
many letters about game law amend- 
ments ; the appeals for assistance in re- 
forming the laws in many States and the 
thousands of questions about breeding 
problems have made it impossible for 
us to answer many of the letters 

The necessity for additional help in 
the office becomes more and more evi- 
dent. Our readers must realize, when 
they think about the matter, that we can- 
not furnish a magazine for a dollar and 
spend a lot of money in active work 
which is necessary to secure legal amend- 
ments favorable to game breeders. The 
correspondence is necessarily heavy in 
every case since it is necessary to not 
only write letters to State officers and 
members of the legislative assemblies but 
also to many people who must be re- 
quested to write to their member. 

We are not lobbyists. The successful 
work which hat, been accomplished has 
been done largely by correspondence. 

It has been decided that the work of 
the society and the work of the publica- 
tion should be conducted separately and 
each should have a competent clerical 
force. The reorganization will take a 
little time, but with double the revenue 
now received twice as much effective 
work can be accomplished and members 
of the society and readers of the pub- 
lication will receive much better service 
than we have been able to render. 



prizes — a number will be given this year. 
There will be several live quail prizes 
and probably one or two prizes of grouse 
and grouse eggs. These prizes are given 
to those who write the best practical let- 
ters giving their experience in game 
breeding. 

We were unable to procure the birds 
for two of the prize winners this spring. 
The birds were ordered early but the 
checks came back because the birds could 
not be delivered. Those entitled to the 
prizes will get their birds- later and we 
expect to send them in ample time for 
the next breeding season. We have in- 
creased opportunities for procuring quail 
(better birds than we could expect last 
season) and we hope and expect to 
award good big Northern quail instead 
of the smaller Mexican birds. The 
grouse and grouse eggs can be secured 
this year we are quite sure. 



OUTINGS AND INNINGS. 
A Reason for It. 

"A scientist declares that meat-eaters are 
more active than vegetarians." 

"They've got to be, to get the meat to eat." 

The most active of all American citi- 
zens are the members of the Game Con- 
servation Society who own the quail they 
produce and whose meat-eating includes 
quail on toast. 

The Transcript will appreciate the 
claim of the game breeders in the game 
prohibition states who manage to eat 
quail on toast that they are the most 
active of all the meat eaters. They have 
to shoot their meat before they eat it. 
«. 



Prizes. 

In reply to an inquiry about live game 



A Woman's Way. 

(From the Edinburgh Scotsman) 
Mollie — Can you keep a secret, Pollie ? 

Pollie Oh, yes ! I can. But I am 

frightfully unlucky in telling them to oth- 
er girls who can't. 

♦ 

War Time Natural History. 

Seven whales washed ashore along the 
Atlantic coast had been riddled by shells 
fired at supposed German submarines. If 
a whale insists on looking like a U boat 
he must take the consequences. • 



150 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T**. e Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Ebited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, AUGUST, 1919. 
TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountriesand Canada,,$i.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 

E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

RAPID GROWTH OF THE IN- 
DUSTRY. 

The game breeding industry is grow- 
ing so rapidly that the laws will soon 
be made to conform with it. As a mat- 
ter of fact it is now generally conceded 
that game farmers own the stock birds 
they have legally acquired and the eggs 
and birds produced by industry. Quail 
and quail eggs, pheasants and ducks of 
all species are freely sold and transported 
for breeding purposes in most of the 
States, and the only reason more game 
is not seen in the markets is there is a 
big demand for the birds from game 
shooting clubs and country places, from 
new commercial breeders, big and small, 
and also from enterprising State game 
officers who wish to see their constituents 
shoot a few pheasants in the open season. 

The New York market was fairly well 
supplied with pheasants, mallards and 
black ducks last season. There will be 
more game sold next fall. 



MORE ABOUT CIDER. 

In an editorial, "Back to the Land," 
we remarked among other things : "Our 
specialty is books and bulletins on game 
breeding, including the magazine for 
game breeders, warranted to send people 
to live in the country on places where 



there is enough freedom to permit the 
restoration of quail on toast and, pos- 
sibly a little near cider as a side line." 

We have numerous readers in the 
House and Senate and to-day we read a 
headline over a Washington dispatch to 
a daily paper: "Cider Scares Drys — 
Decline to List it as a Barred Drink!" 

The Congress acted promptly when we 
pointed out that the Migatory Bird Bill, 
as it was introduced, prevented and pro- 
hibited the production of game birds for 
sport and for profit and even for food. 
The bill was amended so as to prevent 
anyone from interfering with the pro- 
duction of the desirable food. 

It is appropriate, therefore, for the 
Congress to permit rural . residents, 
many of whom now go in for "more 
game" (in fact for an abundance of the 
desirable food) to have some cider to 
go with the birds. The traditional cold 
bottle having gone out upon the incom- 
ing of the restored hot bird, it seems to 
be a fair legislative compromise to per- 
mit all rural residents, who find it pays 
to have game on their farms, to have 
some cider to drink with it. 

There is a nice lot of grapes on one of 
the farms where we shoot and possibly a 
little of the amber or ruddy juice of the 
grapes also may be permitted, provided 
the percentage of "kick" be not greater 
than that contained in cider. This seems 
to be perfectly fair and reasonable. 

Lecky, the author of the History of 
Morals, tells us that "field sports tend to 
keep people in the country and form a 
sufficient counterpoise to the pleasures 
of the town." Now that the sports of 
the field are coming back under liberal 
laws permitting game breeding and it no 
longer is a criminal offence to profitably 
produce game on the farms, we have pre- 
dicted that many people will live in the 
country. If the Congress shall decide to 
let them have a little wine and cider to 
drink with the game the counterpoise, 
referred to by the historian, will be em- 
phasized ; the possibilities of a back to 
the land movement seem to be tremen- 
dous. It may even become a veritable 



THE GAME BREEDER 



151 



stampede and deplete the population of 
the cities and the towns. The problem 
of the abandoned farms will be solved to 
a moral certainty. 



CHANCES ABOUT EVEN. 

The most enthusiastic game politician 
will hardly claim that the State will some 
day introduce buffaloes on the farms and 
restore the chase as we knew it in the 
good old days when dodging hostile 
Sioux was part of the fun. It does not 
seem likely that State game departments 
ever will make elk or deer shooting or 
the coursing of antelope with flee% 
hounds as good as the sport we once en- 
joyed was before the advent of agricul- 
tural operations. Deer in fruit orchards 
and truck gardens are not favored by 
the farmers and even the State rabbit is 
liable to be shot, trapped or poisoned when 
he is found injurious to the crops. Since 
it was evident that the farmers did not 
seem to be aware ( that there were laws 
requiring them not to destroy animals 
which were observed to be harmful many 
of the States decided that it was not 
good politics to arrest farmers for de- 
fending their property and promptly 
amended the laws so as to permit them 
to do so. 

The close tillage of many farms and 
the draining of vast areas have put an 
end to quail and duck shooting in many 
localities where we once shot big bags 
of quail and ducks. Even the advice to 
the farmers that quail are beneficial to 
agriculture has not induced many agri- 
culturists to set aside covers and food 
areas for the birds. The advice has re- 
sulted in the posting of practically all of 
the farms against shooters and it is 
found to be easy to put the quail on the 
song bird list for terms of years or for- 
ever. 

There is about as much chance for 
State game officers to introduce mad 
dogs on the farms or a good lot of cats 
in the bird stores as objects of sport as 
there is to provide for free buffalo, deer 
or quail shooting on the farms. 

The most intelligent State officers now 



agree with us that the best they can do 
is to try and keep up some shooting on 
the public lands and waters and that it 
is wise to distribute birds and eggs to 
those who will look after them properly 
letting the sportsmen arrange with their 
owners for shooting on the farms under 
liberal game breeders' enactments. 



THE STATE AND THE GAME 
FARMER'S GAME. 

Mr. Martin's statement that carting 
the birds from the California state game 
farm all over the state for exhibition 
purposes was bad reminds us of an amus- 
ing display in another state- some years 
ago when an accommodating game breed- 
er loaned a big lot of pheasants, ducks, 
etc., which were labeled "from the state 
game farm" and paraded about for a 
time and then returned to their owner. 

Game breeders, both the game farm- 
ers and the sporting breeders, are an ac- 
commodating lot of people. Always they 
stand ready to sell vast quantities of 
game and game eggs (many thousands in 
fact) to the state commissioners, and all 
sensible game department officers now 
realize that it is quite desirable to be 
able to procure plenty of game and eggs 
at attractive prices. It is quite neces- 
sary to admit that the game and eggs do 
not belong to the state until the bargains 
are concluded. 

The game farmers soon will be able 
to supply all the grouse, quail, deer, 
pheasants, wild ducks and other game 
that the departments can find a place 
for. There are plenty of buffaloes. 

Many farmers will not permit the 
state officers to turn down pheasants or 
other game birds on their farms since 
they are aware that the birds bring unde- 
sirable trespassers. Many states fortu- 
nately contain much wild land, and be- 
fore long many of the states will have 
public shooting and fishing parks for 
those who are not sufficiently industrious 
to properly look after their game and to 
shoot it with the farmer's approval, he 
being properly compensated for the 
shooting and for the land planted with 
covers and foods for the game. 



162 



THE GAME BREEDER 



PRIZE LETTERS WANTED. 

There was no game on the farms 
rented by the Long Island Game Breed- 
ers' Association a year ago last spring. 
Next fall hundreds of pheasants, wild 
ducks and three species of quail will be 
harvested (not otherwise than by shoot- 
ing) by as clever a lot of sportsmen as 
ever formed a shooting syndicate to re- 
store the game and shoot it. 

Dues $1.00 per week and a small war 
tax— $5.20— to help out Uncle Sam. The 
editors will be pleased to publish letters 
from more game law enthusiasts explain- 
ing in detail the objections to producing 
good shooting in a place where there was 
none. They will pay a good price for 
them. 

The old farm house is rented from a 
widow. The association pays a little 
more rent than the preceding tenant 
agreed to pay, but we beleive he found 
it difficult to do so. 

There is another old house on another 
place which has not been occupied for 
years and from which the windows and 
banisters were stolen before the syndi- 
cate rented the shooting. 

Employment is given to the widow of 
a game keeper who has two young chil- 
dren and who acts as housekeeper. Em- 
ployment is provided also for a capable 
keeper who sees that the cats et al do not 
eat up everything in the game line. 

Enough cats have been killed to ex- 
plain why the place was gameless. We 
shall be glad to publish letters from 
sportsmen of generous game law be- 
haviour stating why thev think a closer! 
season or a small bag should be applied 
so as to vacate the premises, stop the 
rent, turn young children out of doors 
or send them to the city and end the 
activities of a skilled cat and other ver- 
min destroyer, who enjoys living and 
working in the country. We will pav a 
good price for a few short articles dis- 
cussing why in the interest of game poli- 
tics and protection the place should be 
closed bv one more game law. 

For the information of Mr. Aldo Leo- 
pold, caoab^e writer and game warden, 
who fears that dukes and lords may only 



let the common people look over the 
fence, we would add that no patents of 
nobility have been issued to any of the 
members of the shooting syndicate and 
we extend an invitation to the alarmist 
to visit the place, shoot for a few days 
and see if he thinks any great public 
wrong is being done. 

Possibly it may be necessary to sell a 
little food to keep the dues down. If so 
some game will be sold if the members 
so desire, but at this inexpensive place 
we think they can eat it all, or at least 
give some to friends. Please let us hear 
from you promptly if you desire this 
place closed, Mr. Leopold. Quail on 
toast has come back to stay, we think. 
Our birds are now singing more abund- 
antly than they are in Ohio. 



He Shot Low. 

A party of gentlemen at a hotel were 
telling stories one night recently of fa- 
mous shots and how many quail, par- 
tridges, ducks and other birds had been 
killed at a single discharge. After lis- 
tening to what seemed a willful exag- 
geration by .different narrators, a stranger 
who was present volunteered his expe- 
rience of his only use of the fatal double 
barreled gun as follows : 

"I went into the field one day to try 
gunning. The only game discovered was 
an immense flock of crows. I should say 
there were 10,000 in the flock. Slowly I 
crawled up to them,' and when not more 
than four rods away the crows rose in a 
solid mass. I fired both barrels, and how 
many do you think I killed?" 

Different guesses were made by the 
party, ranging from 20 to 100. 

"Not one," said the stranger, "but I 
went out with my brother to look for the 
results and picked up four bushels of 
legs. I had shot a little under." — Du 
Pont Magazine. 



He Stood the Raise. 

"Papa, give me a nickel." 

"Why, son, you're too old to be beg- 



ging for nickels." 



"I guess you're right, papa ; make it 
a dime." — Browning's Magazine. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



153 



t^-3 



Wild Mallard Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE TOR PRICES 



-M 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAIN! 

Member of the Game Guild 

Wc Furnish Eggs in Season 



Vj&mnMmwMSim. 



■>; 



F. B. DUSETTE & SONS' GAME RANCH 

BAD AXE, MICH. 



BREEDERS OF: 



Pure Wild Mallards, Black Ducks, 
Wild Turkeys and Bob White Quail 



Our game is grown on our 240- Acre Ranch, with natural feed on 
our Several Lakes, which makes our stock very attractive for 
Breeders, Shooting Clubs and Preserve Owners at a minimum 
price. Our birds comply with the Federal regulations which 
permit shooting and sale. 

Contracts Now Open for August and September 
No Eggs for Sale This Season 

F. B. DUSETTE & SONS, BAD AXE, MICH. 






154 



THE GAME BREEDER 




PEINCES 

FOR GAME PRESERVES 

The accompanying photograph shows one of our Non-Climbable 
" RIOT " fences, erected by us, with our indestructible steel fence post 
8 feet high, surrounding the Yale Bowl Field, New Haven, Conn. 

This fence held in check 80,000 people who attended the Harvard- 
Yale Game, November 25th, 1916, and 60,000 people who attended the 
Princeton-Yale Game, November 13th, 1915. 

We have this fence and many other excellent designs. It will be 
to your advantage to secure our Catalogue, that shows many of the 
best erected fences in this country; also tells about our posts in 
detail ; how to erect a fence ; how to paint the fence wire to keep it 
from rusting. 

Become acquainted with our fence building system. It will save 
you many dollars and a great deal of worry. 

Fences for every purpose, with either straight or non-climbable post, 
tennis court back stops, etc., erected by our trained men anywhere. 

J. M. DOWNS 

38 ROOSEVELT AVENUE Suite A JERSEY CITY, N. J. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 
k on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



THE HONEYSWEET 

BLACK RASPBERRY 

Best for Ho7ne and Market 

The bushes make good cover for game. 

Strawberry and Asparagus Plants. 

Price Lists Free. 

A. B. KATKAMIER MACEDON, N. Y. 



J|L 


BOOK ON 


ffflB^ 


DOG DISEASES 


\w^* 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 


Mailed free t© any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY. GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



Elkhorn Park, consisting of 40 Acres under nine foot fence. 

Eight Buffaloes, seven Elk, Four black and three white English Fallow Deer, 
ten Japanese Sika Deer and a number of fawns and calves belonging to the 
Deer and Elk. 

Cy. DeVry said of my Game: "You have the finest band of Elk I ever saw, and your Buffaloes are equally fine." 

Price for Land and Game $14,000. 



Reason for selling, I have been given ei<4ht months yet to live, 
not appear again. WARREN R. LEACH, Rushville, Ills. 



This "ad" is for immediate sale and will 



(Our readers will regret to learn of the illness of Mr. Leach, who has written some excellent 
articles for the Game Breeder and has sold many deer to readers of the magazine. — Editor) 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More G»me." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



155 



Blue-Winged Teal 

I AM prepared to furnish Blue- 
Winged Teal to Game Breeders 
at the following prices in lots of ten 
or more pairs at $2.75 per pair. 
Single pairs at $4.00 per pair. 

Also a few other varieties such 
as Mallards, Pintails, Green-Winged 
Teal, Spoonbills, Coots, at very at- 
tractive prices. 

The Game Breeder has done more 
for the propagation of birds than 
any other magazine. I believe every 
Game Breeder should support the 
paper for this cause. 

Geo. J. Klein 

Breeder and Dealer in all kinds of Birds 

Ellinwood, Kansas 



Galvanized Steel 
Wire Netting" 

For Fox Farms, Game 
Farms and Preserves. 

We are prepared to quote lowest prices 
for all widths up to 72 inches from H to 2 
inch mesh, and No 14 to 20 gauge. We can 
guarantee prompt deliveries to any point. 

If you are going to start a game ranch, 
farm or preserve this year, or contemplate 
enlarging your old one, get our prices be- 
fore placing your order elsewhere. 

Price list on application, estimate, freight 
paid if you will send specifications of what 
you require. 

Fenimore Haverslick & Co., Inc. 
1 09 Chancery St., Trenlon, N. J. 

JrieeUist on 
a'cal ion. 






THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS 

of BERRY, KENTUCKY 

offer for sale, Setters and Pointers, Fox and Cat Hounds, Wolf 
and Deer Hounds, Coon and Opossum Hounds, Varmint and 
Rabbit Hounds, Bear and Lion Hounds, also Airedale terriers. 
All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser alone to judge the quality, 
satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. Sixty-eight page, 
highly illustrated, instructive, and interesting catalogue for 
ten cents in stamps or coin. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed, Widgeon Grass, Red- Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERULY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More G»me." 



156 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE 



It Is Now Legal to Trap Wild 
Fowl for Breeding Purposes 

Write to The Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, for information about Trapping Permits 

The book, OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS, written by the 
Editor of The Game Breeder, contains full information about the 
trapping of wild fowl and how to rear the birds for profit and 
for sport. There are chapters on How to Form Shooting Clubs ; 
How to Control the Enemies of Wild Fowl, etc. Fully illustrated 
with pictures of ducks on preserves, tic. 

1PR1CE, #2.00 POSTPAID 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., NEW YORK 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 



Decoy Owls for Crow 
and Hawk Shooting 



Established 1860 
Telephone 4569 Spring 



Fred Sauter 



Leading Taxidermist of America. 



42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 



Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 



Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.™' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



167 




We Arc Now 

Booking 

Orders for 

Eggs 

for Spring Delivery from the following vari- 
eties of pheasants : Silver, Golden. Ringneck, 
Lady Amherst, Formosan, White, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Swinhoe, Versicolor. Impeyan, Soem- 
merring, Manchurian Eared, Melanotus, Black- 
throated Golden, Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, Long- 
tails, and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff Orping- 
ton and R. I, Red fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan and Fancy Ducks, 
Doves of several varieties. Deer. Jack 
Rabbits 

Send $1.00 in stamps for Colortype Catalogue 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 

CHINESE PHEASANT EGGS, $3.00 A DOZEN. CAM 
use tame squirrel and Hungarian Partridge Eggs. 
P. W. SCHWEHM, 4219 4th Ave., N. E., Seattle, Wash- 
ington^ 2t 

PHEASANTS WANTED 

I will buy ringnecked pheasants regardless of sex at 
long as they are strong, healthy birds, large and no 
over two years old. Will purchase small or large n u m- 
bers for cash. Reference by permission to the Game 
Breeder. ROBT. BOWMAN, care Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

BANTAMS — GOOD GENTLE BIRDS SUITABLE 
for quail and pheasant breeding JOHN E. DARBY, 
Prop., Maplehurst Poultry Farm, Croswell, Michigan. 

BANTAMS — WILBERT'S FAMOUS BANTAMS. 
Forty varieties. Shipped on approval. Catalog Z&. 
F. C. WILBERT, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



WANTED 

Twenty =Five Sportsmen 

to join me in an exclusive hunting 
and fishing club. Property in Orange 
and Sullivan Counties, N. Y., adjoin- 
ing the Hartwood Club, the Merrie- 
wold Club and the famous Chester 
W. Chapin game preserve. For par- 
ticulars, apply to 

J.S. HOLDEN, PORT JERVIS, N.Y. 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 
Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENINELS 

Grand Island ■ Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



DOGS 



EGGS 



HOUNDS-ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
$1 a year. 



TWO THOUSAND PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. 
Pure Chinese, $3.50 per dozen. Ringnecks, Golden, 
Silver and Mallard Duck, S3. 00 per dozen, J20.00 per 
hundred. CLASSIC LAKE WILD FOWL FARM, 
Manzanita, Oregon. 4t 

RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE. $25.00 

per 100. Golden Pheasant Eggs, 60c. each. Day old 

Pheasants, 60c. each. Booking orders now. Mrs. EDGAR 

TILTON.Suffern, N.Y. st 

STOCK AND EGGS OF RINGNECKS, LADY 
Amherst, Golden and Silver Pheasants. Wild strain 
Mallards. Japanese Silkies, Buff Cochin Bantams. 
" Ringlet " Barred Plymouth Rock Chickens. Peafowl. 
MRS. IVER CHRISTENSON, Jamestown, Kansas. 
No. 1. 6t 



In writing' to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



158 



THE GAME BREEDER 




WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 

Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 




PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 
Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ringnecks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Member of the Game Guild. 

REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

Member of the Game Guild. 





PHEASANT EGGS AND PHEASANTS 

Pheasant eggs for sale up to 
May 15, $25.00 per hundred. 
110 eggs sent for cash with 
order after May 15, $20 per 
110 eggs. Pheasants for Sep- 
tember and October delivery. 
Write for prices. GEORGE 
BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
R No. 1, Englishtown, New 
Jersey. 



LIVE GAME/ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, I Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 



WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Heads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 





Mallard-Pintail 



DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids ^-^=€^1 

These ducks are reared on free range I 1 --"": r 7 f3», ... ■ - ;; \»i 
especiallyfor shooting and for decoys. I 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.60 per pair ; $1.75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 

8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 



BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 




Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN -fc POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 

We have nearly all. of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 

BALDWIN PALMER' 
Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



PHEASANTS 

ENGLISH, RINGNECKS 

Pearl White Guineas and White 

Cochin Bantams 
Baby Pheasants and Eggs in Season 

THE HIRSCH POULTRYYARDS 
45th Place, Lyons, Illinois 



WILD DUCKS 

The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, '-'Our Wild Fowl and Waders. " 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 










i 


ST 


=ss 


i 


* 


*1 

. J 



la writing to advertiser* please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letter*: "Youra for More G 



THE GAME BREEDER 



159 





GAME BIRDS 

'All American game birds are fully 

described in the illustrated book, 

"Our Feathered Game," written by 

the Editor of the Game Breeder 

Price $2.00 

For sale by 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY 

150 Nassau St., New York 



GOLDEN, SILVER, AMHERST, 
REEVES and RINGNECK 
PHEASANTS. 
All pure bred, strong healthy birds. 
Must be seen to be appreciated. 
Prices reasonable. Eggs in season. 

THOS. F. CHESEBROUGH 
Northport, Long Island, N. Y. 



WANTED—PAIR OF RED-FOX PUPS, MALE AND. 
female. Z. TED DeKALMAR, R. F. D. 30, Stam- 
ford, Conn. 



A MILLION FOOD RABBITS WANTED— WE CAN 
sell a million food Rabbits every month right here in 
Chicago and pay you 170 a pound live weight.and all who 
have wearied of gambling in Rabbits ar<d raising them 
merely for pets when the whole world is clamoring for 
food should turn in and help raise the Rabbits for us 
Send for full particulars in the July, Aueust and Septem- 
ber issues of the RABBIT MAGAZINE. OAK PARK, 
ILLINOIS. Only 25£ for the three months (none free). 
Do not miss this wonderful opportunity. 



"WANTED : 

WHITE EUROPEAN SWAN, FEMALE. 
State age and price in your first letter. 

Z. TED DeKALMAR, R. F. D. 30, 
Stamford, Conn. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 3 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



EGGS FOR HATCHING-PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, Nortn Carolina. 8t 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 

FOX AND MINK WANTED 

Wanted — Pair red fox pups : also breeders ; pair mink 
and marten R. H. BARKER, 2034 East Fourth St., 



Cleveland, Ohio. 



It 



LIVE GAME 



AMHERST, REEVES, SILVER AND MONGOLIAN 
Pheasant eggs $5.00 a dozen, two dozen, $9.00. Chinese 
Ringnecks, S3 50 a dozen, $2500 a hundred. Mongolians, 
$35.00 a hundred "Pheasant Farming," illustrated, 50c 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 2 t 

WANTED TO BUY PHEASANTS I WANT 

Silvers. Lady Amherst. Golden and Reeves. 
Quote Prices, Ages, and Quantity. 

Morgan's. Phsntry, 244 E. 61st St., Los Angeles, 01. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 3t 

BREEDER IN THE WEST WHO CAN FURNISH 

Hungarian Partridges, write P. W. SCHVVEHM, 

4219 4th Ave., N. E., Seattle, Wash. 

PHEASANTS AND EGGS FOR SALE. (, OLDENS, 
Lady Amhersis, Versicolors, Manchurian Eared. Gold- 
en Eggs $5.00. and Lady Amherst $7.00 per dozen. 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, Canada. 2t 



RAISE SILVER FOXES. NEW SYNDICATE JUST 
started. New plan. .Sot much money needed. Your 
location will not interfere. Particulars free. C. T. DRYZ, 
5244 South Maplewood Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 2i Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

BELGIAN HARES_GET YOUR BREEDERS FROM 
me, pedigreed and utility matured and young stock for 
sale, best grade stock. State wants fully, no catalog 
ROSEDALE RABBITRY, " Reliable Rabbit Raiser," 
730 College Ave., Rosedale, Kansas. 

FOR SALE—PHEASANTS, PEA FOWL, PIGEONS, 
Poultry, Bantams and Pit Games Eggs from the 
above stock for sale. Rabbits, Cavies, Squirrels, fur 
bearing animals, etc. I buy, sell and exchange. L. L. 
KIRKPATRICK, Box 273, Bristol, Tenn. 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hnki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



Pheasants Wanted 

WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO, SATYR, TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 

Write A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Cal. qt 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FIVE VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. WILD DUCKS. 

Wild Geese, Brants, Wild Turkeys and other Game, 

List for stamp. G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville, Illinois. 4 t 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— FOR FANCY DUCKS 
geese or pheasants. 15 pair of 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds. Ducks S8.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton, Ohio. 2t 

WILD TURKEYS FOR SALE. LARGE, HARDY 

specimens. Satisfaction guaranteed. LEWIS 

COMPTON, Dias Creek, New Jersey. 2t 

HAVE SIX MALE CANVASBACKS FOR SALE, 
$10.00 each or will exchange for wood duck pairs. 
These are hand raised from pure wild stock. Have a few 
canvasback eggs for sale, $12.00 per dozen. A. WOLFE, 
9848 76th Ave., Edmonton, S., Alberta, Canada. It 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE, THE GREATEST 

rabbit for flesh and fur in the world. Send for full 

information and price list. SIBERIAN FUR FARM, 

Hamilton, Canada. 6t 



EG&S 

PHEASANT EGGS--RINGNECK, $2.60 PER 13. 

Wild Mallard Eggs. $1.50 per 11. JOHN SAMMONS, 

Yankton, South Dakota. 2t 

GOLDEN PHEASANT EGGS, $5.00 per doien. Cash 
with order. F. W. DANE, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 3t 

PURE BRED^ WILD DUCK EGGS FOR SALE— 
From my New^Jersey farm, pure bred, light gray wild 
mallard duck eggs. Stock strong on wing. $3.50 per 13 ; 
$25.00 per 100. H. W. VAN ALEN, 215 Montague St,, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 2t 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



IF YOU WOULD BE SUCCESSFUL IN RAISING 
a high per cent of your baby birds — quail, pheasants, 
wild turkeys, etc., feed them MEAL WORMS.a choice, 
clean, insect food. 500, $1.00 ; 1,000, $1.50 ; 5.000, $5.00. 
Express prepaid. See last year s advertisements in April, 
June and August numbers. C. R. KERN, Mount Joy, 
Pennsylvania. 2t 



GAMEKEEPERS 

GAMEKEEPER AT LIBERTY. RELIABLE, WANTS 
position on club preserve or game farm. Experienced 
on game and ornamental birds or animals, gun dogs and 
extermination of vermin. MILTON, in care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 



WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A. S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 

GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

WANTED SITUATION— A GAMEKEEPER FAMIL- 
iar with pheasant and poultry rearing. I have also had 
experience in general farming and can plan the planting 
for game. BRUCE LANE, care of Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. THOR- 

oughly experienced in rearing Pheasants, Wild Turkeys 

and Wild Ducks. Good references. GAMEKEEPER, 

463 East 57th St., N. Y. C. it 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER WITH 
a game shooting club or preserve owner. Experienced 
in breeding all species of game, dog breaking and the 
control of vermin. Good reierences. WM. J. STRANG, 
care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

YOUNG MAN, RETURNED FROM FOREIGN 
service. General knowledge of game breeding and 
farming. Exceptional dairy experience. Thoroughly 
experienced in handling pedigreed horses, cattle and 
sheep. Best reference. Available right away. J. A. 
TYLER, care of THOMAS MacINTYRE, 9129 121st 
Street, Richmond Hill, Long Island, N. Y. 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Silver, Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared. 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Excellent 
references. Age 36, married. W. E. B., care of The 
Game Bieeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house of six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



(n writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 




Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 &1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood-Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 300 best 
Royal Swans of England. I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 
I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — It will pay yon to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelohia. 






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WM. J. MACKENSEN 



Department V. 



YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Guild 




Farm or Preserve 



A large tract of land suitable for a game farm or 
preserve is offered for sale at an attractive price. 

The land is near New York on a good Automobile 
Road and contains a large pond and stream. There 
are some trout and the waters can be made to yield 
large numbers of these fish. The land is suitable for 
deer, upland game and wild ducks. I shall be pleased 
to show this property to anyone wishing to' start a 
game farm or preserve. 

The place is within fifty miles of the City and can be 
reached by Automobile in an hour and a half. 

For particulars address, 

- . OWNER ===== 



Care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York 



5~f Ucj 




Single Copies 10 



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TH Er 



QAn E 5UEEDER 



Vi I. xv 



SEPTEMBER, 1919 



No. 6 




The- Object of this magazine- is 

TO MAKE: NORTH AMEEICATHE" 5IGGEST 

Game Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field— Farmers and Sportsmen - Crimes Galore 
—Two Minks as an Illustration — Opposing Interests — Hostile 
Interests— What Can Be Done — Class Legislation —A Change 
in Opinion — Study and Publicity — Quiet Places — Some Pro- 
gressive Ideas— The Sale of Mr. Leach's Game. 
How to Breed Wild Geese and Wild Ducks - H. G. Jager 

Protecting Quail Catholic Messenger 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves By Our Readers 
Importation of Eggs from China — Lepidium Virginicum— 
The Use of Maggots — How to Raise Maggots— Long, Long 
Time on the Way— How to Do It — Glad to Support the 
Game Breeder— Good News— Egg Importations— New Cus- 
tomers—Peculiar Industry— The Game Market— Wild Ducks 
—Wild Geese — Wood Duck— Buffaloes — Near Mallards — 
— Northern Quail — Mexican Quail — Deer — Rabbits — A 
More Game Object Lesson — More About Wood Pigeons. 
Editorials— The Game Breeding Outlook— Buffaloes, Grouse and 

Game Ownership. 
Correspondence, Trade Notes, Etc. 



Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July g, igi 5 , at the Post Office, 
New York City, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 




THE- GAME- CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A f.9>*v/f/s 



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SPRATT'S 

PHEASANT FOOD No. 3 

is rich in ingredients com- 
posed of and supplying car- 
bohydrates and frame build- 
ing elements and which are 
very easily assimilated into 
the system. 

Being a cooked food, it 
is part pre-digested. It is 
best prepared with hot 
water, then allowed to cool, 
feeding it to the birds as the warm soft food. 

The natural adjuncts to this highly vitalizing meal are 

SPRATT'S CRISSEL 




a perfect substitute for insect life and Ants' eggs and 
the purest form of meat obtainable. 

SPRATT'S CARDIAC or GAME SPICE 

which contains valuable stimulating and appetizing properties 
and should be added to staple food during raw and inclement 
weather, and 

SPRATT'S PHEASANTINA 

a fine mixture of choice meats, scientifically blended to supply 
the elements necessary for the formation of bone, body and 
muscle. It can also be used as an appetizer when the birds 
are off their feed. 

We also manufacture the following : 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL fl2 (for Pheasants, Partridges and Quail Chicks). 
SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL #5 (for Young Pheasants). 
SPRATT'S MAXCO (the most nourishing food obtainable). 
SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MEAL (the best for ducklings). 

Send 25c for "Pheasant Culture." "Poultry Culture " sent on receipt of 10c. 

SPRATT'S PATENT (AMERICA) LIMITED 

NEWARK, N.J. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



161 



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Which Do You Use? 

The only question is one of choice; you can buy 
any one of the m loaded with Infallible or ' 'E. C. ' ' 

Any one of these fourteen standard brands of 
shells is the best to the man who is accustomed 
to use it — when it is loaded with a Hercules 
Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 
Pick your favorite — loaded with Infallible or 
"E. C. " — and you will have a combination that 
is hard to equal at the traps or in the field. 

HEF&ULES 

Smokeless Shotgun 

POWDERS 



INFALLIBLE 



e.c: 



are always the same. They always give the 
same even patterns and high velocity with light 
recoil, always burn free and clean and always 
act the same under any weather conditions. 
When you buy your favorite shells be sure that 
they are loaded with a Hercules Smokeless 
Shotgun Powder, Infallible or "E. C." 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

61 W. 10th Street 
Wilmington Delaware 






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It'*-: 



. 261-1 

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HIGH GUN 
IDEAL 
PREMIER 
TARGET 



R3 m Vkt totl 

ARROW 
NITRO CLUB 



SELBY LOADS 

CHALLENGE GRADE 
SUPERIOR GRADE 



flgpLACK SHELLS 

^^ AJAX 

CLIMAX 

FIELD 
RECORD 

Winchester. 

REPEATER 
LEADER 



162 



THE GAME BREEDER 



r .v>."-vr;v.i.". ■ ' .'"-■ ' - ' ■ ' " ■-" '';— 2 




589 Straight Run 589 

Fred Gilbert and The Parker Single Barrel Trap 
Gun make the world's record in competition. 
589 Without a Miss 589 
Eventually you will shoot the PARKER. Why not 
now? 

Send for catalogue and free booklet about 20 bore guns. 
A. W. du BRAY, Pacific Coast Agent. 
P. O. Box 102, San Francisco 



PARKER BROS. 

Master Gun Makers MERIDEN, CONN.. U. S. A. 

New York Salesrooms, 25 Murray Street 



Hunting Clothing, 

Rifles, Revolvers, 

Ammunition and 
all Fall and Winter 

Sporting Goods 




Shown in our 

Catalogue No. 80 

ready for mailing 

also 

No. 78 Fishing Tackle 

and No. 79 Summer 

Sports Lists 



SCHOVERLING DALY & GALES, 302-304 Broadway, New York 




BREEDERS OF 

Pheasants, Peafowl, Waterfowl, Quail, 

Ornamental Birds, Utility Flemish Giant 

and New Zealand Red Rabbits, etc. 



If States, Preserves and Hunting- Clubs will place their orders for 
next season before shipping lime this year we will supply eaily 
hatched birds and early eggs in any quantity desired. As we were 
compelled to refuse orders for thousands of both birds and eggs 
this year, we advise placing your order as soon as possible. We can 
ship safely any place in the United States. Correspondence solicited. 



MARMOT PHEASANTRY, 



MARMOT, OREGON 



*n writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



163 



iiiiiiiniiij 




Sport That Thrills 

The scurry of quail in the thicket is music to the sportsman's 
ear. A shot at a mallard is worth hours of waiting. But right 
here at home there's a sport with a thousand thrills — all yours for 
the seeking. Go out to your local club today and try 

TRAPSHOOTING 

Hundreds of gamey clay "birds" await your call. Each one a 
tantalizer — hurling away through the summer's air at express' train speed 
— dipping, dodging in ever-changing, mystifying angles. 

A few seconds to judge — a snap decision. Bang! goes your gun ! 
Man, there are your thrills — and as fast as you care to take them. There 
is only one thing faster and that is 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

— good, old reliable time'proved powders. The choice of the Nation's crack shots. Look 
for the brand names, Dupont, Ballistite or Schultze on the shell box when you purchase. 

Write today for our free book " The Sport Alluring " and the name of your 
nearest gun club. 

Sporting Powder Division 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 
Wilmington, Delaware. 




mnDanma 



164 



THE GAME BREEDER 



No. 3 

American Sportsmen Scries 

Painted for Remington UMC 

by F. X. Lcyendeckcr 



L 







Practical \Vorth 

TODAY more than for many years past, tne practical value ex a man s 
gun and dog is tne true measure or nis pride in them. He has a new 
appreciation or service ■ — and wants it. 

The most valuable recent service to shotgun shooters, in the matter or their equipment, is 
tne wonderful Wetproof process or waterproofing Remington UMC shot shells, invented; 
and developed by Remington UMC during the war. 

Your Remington UMC " Arrow or " Nitro Club W etproof Steel Lined Speed Shells will 
neither shrink and bake their wads in hot, dry -weather, nor swell up and jam m the gun 
when it is very damp. In spite of exposure m the hardest ram or the leakiest boat, they will 
work as smoothly and fire as perfectly as your modern Remington UMC Autoloading or 
Pump Gun long after other shells have soaked and swelled themselves useless. 

Sold by your local Remington UMC dealer — one of more than 82,700 in this country. 

THE REMINGTON ARMS UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Inc. 

Largest Manufacturers of Firearms and Ammunition in the "World 
WOOL WORTH BUILDING NEW YORK 



T he Game Breeder 



VOLUME XV 



SEPTEMBER, J9I9 

Co} 

SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 6 



Farmers and Sportsmen. 

Long we have known that one of the 
chief reasons why America became 
gameless, or nearly so, is the lack of 
harmony between the sportsmen and the 
farmers who own most of the good 
shooting grounds. 

Able agriculturists and prominent 
sportsmen are aware of the inharmoni- 
ous relation which has resulted in many 
legal absurdities, a perfect bedlam in the 
matter of game legislation and a chaotic 
condition in the many court decisions 
which have been rendered. The situa- 
tion is well known to all lawyers of 
ability. There are decisions that the 
state owns the game; there are decisions 
that the farmer owns it or has a "quali- 
fied ownership" in it while it remains on 
his farm. There are very few, if any, 
decisions as to who owns the game pro- 
duced by a rapidly growing industry. 
There are laws and decisions which pre- 
vent the sale of the desirable food, the 
effects of which are to stop industry. 
It has been decided that a person who 
legally takes a desirable food bird by his 
industry and at some expense does not 
own it after he procures it. It is no 
wonder that we have no game as a food 
supply in America. 

Crimes Galore. 

Although the game laws and the de- 
cisions have not produced, any game or 
good shooting, or even kept the upland 
game birds sufficiently plentiful to make 
it safe to permit any shooting, they have 
produced a vast amount of undesirable 
crime, much of it of an unusual, startling 
and even shocking character. Thou- 
sands of arrests and convictions are 
made and secured every year for of- 



fenses without moral turpitude; for 
doing things, in fact, which are deemed 
praiseworthy in all civilized countries 
where the game is an abundant and 
cheap food. The arrests and convictions 
of people because they have stock birds 
or eggs in their possession or because 
they produce food on their farms or 
even offer such food produced by indus- 
try for sale, do not seem right to people 
who are not professional game-savers, or 
employed to make such arrests. 

Two Minks as an Illustration. 

A farmer in Iowa was arrested, con- 
victed and fined for killing a mink in the 
closed season for fur-bearing animals. 
The mink had killed about fifty of the 
farmer's hens. The farmer elected to 
go to jail, although able to pay a fine. 
A farmer in New Hampshire killed a 
mink which was swimmnig behind his 
geese in his pond. The Supreme Court 
of the State decided that the farmer had 
the right to defend his property. So 
there you are. A crime and not a crime 
to do the same thing in the United 
States. There has been far too much 
crime of this character in the country 
and much of it can be obviated when 
simple and proper game laws are 
enacted. 

A sportsman legally killed a pheasant 
in a county in New York where it was 
legal to do so. In order to take the 
food home to another county where it 
was legal to possess the food he was 
obliged to travel through a third county 
having a closed season. Game wardens 
aware of the fact traveled with the 
owner of the food in order to make an 
arrest in the proper county. 

People traveling through New Jersey 



166 



THE GAME BREEDER 



with food legally procured were appre- 
hended so often that the matter became 
a public scandal and disgrace until an 
able state officer put an end to the per- 
formance and the graft and fines due 
to the game laws. People shooting in 
the South and returning with food le- 
gally taken were held up and fined upon 
their return home until the New York 
State Game Officer denounced the per- 
formances and put an end to them. A 
vast amount of crime of this character 
has not resulted in the people having 
cheap game to eat or even in the sports- 
men having good shooting. 

Opposing Interests. 

Organized sportsmen and game-savers 
'continually are at work pushing new 
legislation supposed to be in the interest 
of saving the game for shooting. Or- 
ganized farmers continually urge the 
legislators to make further restrictions 
intended to keep the gunners off the 
farms. As a last resort the farmers al- 
ways favor laws prohibiting shooting for 
terms of years or forever, although in 
so doing they prohibit themselves from 
eating a desirable food which always 
should be abundant on the farms, and 
profitably so, and which should be a 
cheap food for all of the people. 

Hostile Interests. 

Those who have studied the subject 
are well aware that to continue to enact 
the legislation asked for annually by the 
farmers who own the shooting grounds 
and the sportsmen who propose to make 
the laws regulating sport on the farms, 
can only result in the sportsmen having 
no shooting and in the farmers having 
very little or no game and certainly none 
to eat or sell. 

The importance of making a simple 
law satisfactory to both interests is evi- 
dent. If a short, simple enactment, sat- 
isfactory to both the farmers and the 
sportsmen, can be placed in the books, 
millions of dollars which annually are 
wasted in the efforts to secure new laws 
and in various game saving enterprises 
can be saved. Thousands of contradic- 
tory statutes and court decisions and' 



many thousands of improper arrests can 
be done away with. Legal traps and 
snares for the unwary and really inno- 
cent people can be abolished. State Game 
Departments can be made of great eco- 
nomic importance. 

What Can Be Done. 

Having interviewed hundreds of 
sportsmen and some farmers and others 
interested in agriculture, we have ar- 
rived at the. conclusion that a short, sim- 
ple law which will remain permanent 
and which will put an end to a vast 
amount of legislation and litigation can 
be written and enacted. Before such 
a law can be enacted it is quite necessary 
that the whole subject of game manage- 
ment should be studied and that a wide 
publicity be given to the investigations 
which must be made in order to deter- 
mine what can be accomplished. It will 
be necessary for the sportsmen to con- 
cede that the farmer has the right to per- 
mit or prohibit shooting on his farm. It 
seems necessary to admit that it should 
not be a crime profitably to produce the 
desirable food on the farms and to sell 
it under proper regulations. We have 
failed to find a single person who will 
say that the profitable production of food 
should be criminal. If any such there 
be we will be glad to give publicity to 
his reasons for the assertion and will 
pay for the article. 

There is a nation-wide regret that the 
game laws have not resulted in preserv- 
ing upland shooting. Sportsmen, with 
the possible exception of some sporting 
politicians, are quite ready to have an 
investigation made in order to determine 
if it is necessary to put the quail on the 
song-bird list and to prohibit upland 
shooting for terms of years or forever. 
All sportsmen, we are quite sure, are 
ready to have the subject carefully 
studied by those interested in agricul- 
ture and those sincerely interested in 
field sports. Prominent naturalists 
should be consulted about the natural 
laws relating to the increase and decrease 
of species and the control of harmful 
species and the kind and amount of such 
control, with a view to disposing of this 



THE GAME BREEDER 



167 



subject permanently and in a proper 
manner. The question of bounties and 
all other questions should be considered 
and settled before any attempt is made 



to secure legislation. 



Class Legislation. 

Sportsmen were heard to say not so 
very long ago that there must be no 
game breeding, no renting of shooting 
from the farmers ; that there must be no 
sale of game even when it be produced 
by industry. It was urged that legisla- 
tion in these directions was class legis- 
lation, intended to favor an industrious 
class, to be sure, willing to do some- 
thing practical, but decried as inimical 
to the free licensed gunners. 

The farmers, on the other hand, have 
a right to regard laws proposed by 
sportsmen and intended to provide shoot- 
ing on the farms as class legislation. 
Sportsmen may regard laws made by 
farmers as class legislation. People who 
would prefer to eat the desirable food 
may well regard the limiting to sports- 
men only of the right to have the food 
or the closing of the farms to food pro- 
duction as undesirable class legislation 
in so far as they are concerned ; and 
people who for sentimental reasons are 
opposed to field sports may regard all 
the others as engaged in class legislation 
quite at variance with the ideas of people 
of their class, who surely are entitled to 
their opinions and should have the right 
to express them, but possibly not to put 
them in the law books. 

It may seem difficult to plan -a meas- 
ure acceptable to a majority of the peo- 
ple of the various classes. There has 
been, however, a "revolution of thought 
and a revival of common sense" recently, 
which the late Charles Hallock, the popu- 
lar dean of sportsmen said was quite 
necessary. There can be no doubt that a 
few years ago it would have been diffi- 
cult to persuade the Audubon Associa- 
tion to favor the sale of game. The 
Association believed that such sales 
would result in extermination. The 
writer, a sportsman of some experience, 
entertained the same ideas, but aban- 
doned them after studying the subject. 



A Change in Opinion. 

People who understand, the subject 
now believe that the regulated sale of 
game quickly will result in a tremendous 
abundance of the desirable food. Pro- 
fessor Pearson, secretary of the Audubon 
Association, after giving the subject due 
consideration and study, wrote to the 
editor of The Game Breeder that the 
producer of game should have +he same 
right to sell his food as the producer of 
a pig has to sell his pig. Such ideas 
may seem shocking to professional game 
savers and to some sportsmen who have 
not studied the subject and who don't 
know what is the matter or how to apply 
a remedy. 

Study and Publicity. 

There certainly can be no objection to 
a careful study of all phases of the im- 
portant subject. There should be no ob- 
jection to the widest publicity being given 
to investigations intended to discover 
what is the matter and if there is a rem- 
edy which can be accepted by all classes 
and not regarded as class legislation. 

It is evident that such study and in- 
vestigation should be made by people of 
ability ; that all classes should be given a 
patient hearing and that publicity should 
be given to their demands. 

There can be no doubt that the sub- 
ject should not be studied only by people 
of one class. All should be fully repre- 
sented. Heretofore classes have acted 
separately with bad results. It is an 
absolute certainty that the subject should 
not be studied by people of one political 
faith to the exclusion of people of an- 
other political faith. Politics should 
have no place whatsoever, but await the 
result of the impartial investigation and 
see if it be not eminently satisfactory to 
both parties. 

The trouble, as we see it, has resulted 
in the hostility referred to between farm- 
ers and sportsmen and the attempts of 
politicians to ride both. 

Quiet Places. 

The State of Massachusetts has gone 
in strongly for quiet places where the 
first essential is, "The Prohibition of 






168 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Shooting." Scintincut Neck Reservation 
contains about 1,000 acres; Great Island 
Reservation contains 600 acres. Other 
Massachusetts State reservations and 
their approximate areas, where the State 
prohibits shooting, are: Marblehead 
Neck, 300 acres ; Andover Reservation, 
1,200 acres; Hingham Reservation, 5,000 
acres; Marshfield Reservation, 5,000 
acres; Tyngsborough Reservation, 150 
acres; Millis, 2,000 to 3,000 acres; Hub- 
bardston, 3,000 acres ; Lynnfield, 750 
acres; Mansfield-Foxborough, 1,800 
acres; Bare Hill, 1,740 acres; Taunton, 
2,750 acres ; Pittsfield, 368 acres ; Tyngs- 
borough, additional, 335 acres. 

In addition to the foregoing quiet and 
non-food-producing areas there are the 
Island of Martha's Vineyard, closed to 
heath hen shooting, and the Myles Stand- 
ish State Forest, about 7,000 acres, which 
the State has just arranged to post 
against all shooting. 

Proper Management. 

Looking at the closed areas in Massa- 
chusetts anyone familiar with game 
breeding and its possibilities, would 
say that easily many tons of game can 
be produced annually on such areas and 
that some might be opened for orderly 
shooting. 

The State easily could provide some 
inexpensive shooting, and the shooting, 
paradoxical as the statement may seem, 
would keep the game abundant and the 
food cheap in the Massachusetts markets. 



It would do a lot of good if some of 
these clubs would invite some of the 
game-law hunters to see • the shooting. 
It probably would be a great surprise 
to many game-law hunters to learn that 
setters and pointers still are used in 
many places to hunt quail and other 
game. 

We hope the Game Conservation So- 
ciety at one of its new places may be 
able to keep the shooting, also, open for 
inspection and professional game-keeper 
on the grounds can give instruction in 
the handling of dogs and in wing shoot- 
ing to the younger generation who have 
been taught to hunt nothing but game 
laws and clay pigeons. What the Boston 
trap-shooting club can do will clearly be 
possible for some of the game shooting 
clubs, but the work is especially suitable 
for the associations affiliated with the 
Game Conservation Society, since at 
such places the sportsmen can learn all 
about the best guns and ammunition for 
bird shooting as well as the comparative 
merits of pointers and setters. 



Some Progressive Ideas. 

The Montclair Gun Club, a new Boston 
organization, has the right idea. Its traps 
will be open all day with a professional on the 
grounds to give instruction, just as the golf 
club professional does. The club will be con- 
ducted along the lines of the modern golf 
club. Cards will be placed in the hotels telling 
of the club, where it is located, etc., and every 
hotel clerk will be posted about the club. 
What Boston can do Philadelphia, New York, 
Chicago, Denver, San Francisco and other 
large cities can do. Everything depends upon 
the trapshooters themselves. — National Sports 
Syndicate. 

Many of the game-shooting clubs 
should be glad to have visitors see the 
abundant quail, pheasants, wild ducks, 
etc., at any time during the breeding 
season. 



Mr. Warren R. Leach of Rushville, 
Illinois, who is well known to many of 
the older readers of The Game Breeder 
who read his articles on breeding, writes 
that he received inquiries in answer to 
his advertisement, but that the big and 
small game in his park has not been sold. 
The advertisement was only for one 
time and so states. Those in charge of 
The Game Breeder 'think far more of 
doing some good in the world than they 
do about making money. Mr. Leach 
says it is likely that some people thought 
I merely claimed to be ill. 

We have known what the trouble is. 
We were sorry to have Mr. Leach say 
in his letter, "I'll be 'going West' some 
day in the very near future." But he 
adds, "I would be just as happy and 
care-free if I knew it was to come before 
this letter reaches you." 

There is a much bigger demand for 
birds than there is for bison and other 
big game, but Mr. Leach's stock is ex- 
cellent. We hope it will be sold. We 
are running his ad a second time without 
pay and without an order. We hope it 
will benefit Mr. Leach. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



169 







:;- 









j 



Snow Geese and Blue Geese on H. J. Jager's farm 

HOW TO BREED WILD GEESE AND WILD DUCKS. 

H. G. Jager. 

(Mr. Jager is the first breeder who has successfully bred the Snow Goose and in all 
probability these vanishing fowl will become abundant in the United States and Canada. 
He has performed a great public service. — Editor.) 






To anyone who has developed the in- 
stinct and feeling of the hunter or natur- 
alist there is no more enjoyable and in- 
teresting pastime than game breeding. 
In fact, our feathered game friends are 
so interesting and captivating that asso- 
ciation with them has changed many a 
"game-hog" into a game protector. I 
know the enjoyment and stimulus of 
hunting, but I much prefer to spend my 
time among my flock of game birds and 
the pleasure thereof is very difficult to 
surpass. On my return from my week- 
ly trips my birds come to see and greet 
me like a faithful dog. If a strange 
dog or anything else frightens them they 
will rush towards the house for our pro- 
tection. 

The Canada geese, or honkers, are as 
easily raised as tame geese. With very 
rare exceptions they do not breed until 
three years old, in pairs only, and they 
are mated for life. They are much like 
folks in choosing their mates, some re- 
maining single for several years until 
they find a mate to suit them. I know 
of one old gander that killed several 
geese that were trying to win his affec- 
tions, and he finally chose a toulouse 
goose for his mate. I have a gander that 
I offered three different geese before he 



found one to suit him. Once mated a 
gander defends his goose and her nest to 
his last breath. This makes it necessary 
to have separate pens for each pair dur- 
ing the nesting season, unless you have 
a whole farm for them to run on and 
plenty of water holes or ponds. I use a 
pen about two rods square with a water 
hole four feet in diameter, and an "A" 
shaped coop facing southeast and filled 
with leaves or straw, in the middle of 
the pen or in the corner farthest away 
from other pens, for their nesting place. 
All my geese — about fifty in number — 
run together in a ten acre cow pasture 
containing two small ponds and plenty of 
grass. As each pair selects their nest 
and begins laying, I confine them to their 
chosen pen. A few days after they 
hatch I open the fence and let them go 
out into the pasture. If I want to raise 
the goslings as pets, I put the eggs under 
a setting hen a few days before they 
hatch. I feed the babies lettuce and 
bread soaked in sweet milk for a few 
days and let them run with the hen on 
the lawn. As they become strong enough 
to bite off the grass I feed them only a 
little ground feed, of any kind, twice a 
day. When about half feathered out I 
let them eat whole grain with the chick- 



170 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Wild Canada Gander Leading a Flock oCWhiteSFronted Geese on H. J. Jager's Plant. 



ens. Fresh water and sand should 
always be before them. As they soon 
fill the water dish with dirt, it should be 
easily cleaned, and a partly covered dish, 
in which they cannot wash, is preferable. 
The goslings that run with their parents 
seldom get any feed until they can eat 
whole grains. As grass is their natural 
food one system is as good as the other 
for growing geese, but the ones raised 
by hand are easier to handle because of 
their tameness. They will follow you 
like a dog, but if you give them a chance, 
while young, they will also follow 
strangers and be lost. 

I have never attempted to feed for egg 
production. The geese eat with the 
chickens whatever I happen to feed them. 
If they start laying while the weather is 
yet cold, as they often do, I remove the 
eggs from the nest but substitute old 
spoiled ones until the goose is ready to 
set. Then I take away all the eggs, 
cover up the nest, and turn the pair loose 
for about a week, when I again uncover 
her nest and in a few days she will again 
begin laying her second setting. This 
plan does not work unless she starts 
laying very early. Last year one goose 
layed two settings of seven eggs each. 
A friend of mine tried removing the 
eggs as fast as layed, leaving only a nest 
egg. His two geese layed thirteen and 
fifteen eggs and quit without becoming 
broody. From five to eight eggs makes 
a setting, six being the most common. 

I have not yet succeeded in breeding 
the Hutchins and Cackling geese, but 
still hope to do so. It took me eight 
years to induce a pair of my wing-tipped 



snow geese to breed, but for the past 
three years they have nested and hatched 
six young each year. This year a heavy 
snowstorm covered their first egg with 
four inches of snow for two days and 
nights and it froze quite hard besides, 
but the egg hatched just the same as 
those laid after the snow and frost dis- 
appeared. They make their nest in the 
middle of the pasture, pulling dead grass 
into a little depression in the ground, and 
when ready to set the goose lines it with 
her down. I am convinced that they 
hatch several days short of four weeks, 
but cannot give the exact time of incu- 
bation. 

Mr. Lee S. Crandall, of the New York 
Zoological Society, in his report on the 




Snow Geese and Young Referred to. 

breeding of game birds in captivity, 
credits me with having the only pair of 
captivity-breeding lesser snow geese and 
says : "The reluctance of snow geese to 
breed in this country and the readiness 
with which they breed in Europe can 
probably be accounted for by the estab- 
lishment of captivity bred strains by 
European breeders. It is to be hoped, 
now that Mr. Jager's birds are breeding, 



THE GAME BREEDER 



171 



he will be able to give us a line on breed- 
ing snow geese." Mr. Crandall's hopes 
will be realized. The only female raised 
from this pair was two years old last 
spring and mated with a captured snow 
gander. She laid five eggs, all fertile, 
but did not make her own nest nor did 
she become broody. That is sometimes 
the case the first year a goose lays. This 
goose laid her eggs in different nests with 
tame geese, and I expect that next year 
she will choose one of these nesting 
coops for her own nest. 

My old snow gander stands guard at 
the nest every minute after the goose be- 
gins setting, and his fierce attacks make 



let her set and raise her brood. Ten, 
twelve, and eight were the three hatches 
for this season. I have bought many 
birds that were called black ducks, but 
all were mixed breeds except these, which 
I secured from Dr. Whealton. I feed 
the ducklings exactly the same as the 
goslings and let them run on the fresh 
lawn, where they catch bugs to their 
hearts' content. While the duck is set- 
ting the drake stays at the pond, but 
when she appears with her brood he re- 
tires to the barnyard and stays with the 
chickens, as if to say: "It's up to you, 
mother, raising children is not in my line 
— have your own way about it." 




Three Canada Geese and one Cackling Goose, Which is the Bantam of 
Canada Geese, Property of H. J. Jager 



it impossible to approach within two 
hundred feet of the nest. I have to 
place a dish of water near by, or he 
would suffer from thirst. The goose will 
leave the nest to eat and drink at the 
pond thirty rods away, but the gander 
never leaves it. I am also hoping to in- 
duce my two pair of blue geese to breed, 
as the presence of the snow goose on its 
nest seems to interest them greatly. 

I am now raising the pure wild black 
mallard freely after several years' ex- 
periment. One old duck has filled her 
nest three times this season, resting only 
a few days between settings. She makes 
her nest in a corner in the barn, and 
when she becomes broody I take the eggs 
away and put them under a setting hen. 
In a few days she makes a new nest and 
lays an egg every morning, and thus the 
process is repeated. The third time I 



I have had pintailed ducks also nest 
in the barn, but only after several years' 
residence on the place. I winter all my 
water fowl in the basement of my barn, 
and this seems to influence them to nest 
there. The young of any bird will, I be- 
lieve, breed freely on the place where 
they were raised. 



Returning Readers. 

Many readers write thanking us for 
keeping their subscriptions alive while 
they were away. They say they are 
reading the back copies of The Game 
Breeder with interest, and they can see 
that the industry promises to grow with 
great rapidity and that sporting condi- 
tions will be much improved, since game 
soon will be abundant everywhere. 



172 



THE GAME BREEDER 



PROTECTING QUAIL. 

(The following article, which appeared in the Catholic Messenger, was forwarded by 
one of our Iowa readers. — Editor.) 



The Farmers' Institute of Johnson 
County has adopted resolutions protest- 
ing the passage of any bills by the pres- 
ent Legislature repealing the laws pro- 
tecting quail. This is the first informa- 
tion that most Iowans have received that 
there were any laws in Iowa "protecting 
quail." True, inspired by some inexperi- 
enced individuals the Legislature adopted 
a law prohibiting the shooting of quail 
before 1922, but how this law protects 
the quail is hard to understand. 

Suppose the Iowa Legislature, for the 
purpose of protecting the Iowa hen, 
should provide that no hen or its egg or 
chick should be killed by shooting or 
otherwise for a period of five years ; 
would the hen be protected? We think 
not. The incentive for protection has 
been destroyed. The reason that the hen 
has been protected and has been the great 
financial asset of the State is because the 
farmer has an interest in protecting her, 
not by law, but by giving her shelter and 
food and drink, and protecting her from 
her enemies the elements. The farmer 
gets repaid for doing the very thing that 
he is prohibited from doing for the quail. 
He sells all the eggs that are not needed 
for hatching chickens for stocking the 
aviary. He protects the hens and chick- 
ens because there is a profit in it. Be- 
cause quail belong to the State he has no 
interest in them, and if he did spend his 
time and money to protect them, the 
State, which insists on owning them, 
would allow some pot-hunter to reap the 
benefit of his labor and his money. 

What anyone means l by protecting 
quail is increasing their production, and 
the quail is the most prolific breeder 
known to zoo science. Quail in captivity 
will lay as high as 60 or 70 eggs in a sea- 
son, and if left to their natural resources 
will hatch out a dozen or two of young 
in a season. The male is as good a 
brooder as the hen. 



One among a dozen lessons we learned 
from the war was how to increase pro- 
duction. The farmer was not raising 
wheat enough. The reason, at the nor- 
mal market price, other grains were 
more profitable. So the Government 
adopted Hoover's idea, made the raising 
of wheat profitable, and the farmer was 
given a guaranteed price for two years. 
Production will be double this year what 
it was before the war if nature be genial. 

Why not protect quail in the same 
way? Say to each land owner in Iowa 
build shelters for quail and provide food 
that will carry them safely through an 
Iowa winter — protect them from the 
"vermin" that destroys them. The State 
could help in this by offering a small 
bounty on weasels, rats, stray cats, crows 
and hawks. 

If you haven't quail, the State will fur- 
nish you birds or eggs. In New Mexico 
the State furnishes birds and guarantees 
a market — and the farmer raises them in 
captivity. Let every local game warden 
stay a month or more at the State game 
farm and study how to protect wild 
birds, then he can assist the farmer and 
aid in the production of wild game. Then 
let the State game warden guarantee a 
price of 50 cents or 75 cents per bird. 
License a dealer in every community that 
will sell birds legitimately killed under 
rules and regulations fixed by the game 
warden. Let the land owner own the 
quail that he has raised or protected the 
same as he owns hens and chickens and 
other domestic fowls. If one quail is a 
good insect destroyer a thousand would 
destroy many more insects. 

If the farmer don't desire to kill his 
quail with a hatchet, he could sell shoot- 
ing rights to real sportsmen who would 
live up to all regulations. The State by 
fixing the license to shoot on uninclosed 
or State preserves at from $5 to $10 a 
year, would get half a million dollars to 



THE GAME BREEDER 



173 



finance game propagation, and quail and 
other game would be really protected. 

We would like to be shown by farmers 
themselves that they know of any in- 
crease of quail since the passage of the 
law prohibiting their killing. A writer 
in The Game Breeder, las August (1918) 
thus stated the proposition : 

"The Game Breeder is right. Game, 
excepting only migratory birds, must 
have a profitable market value if it is 
ever again to be plentiful. The farmer 
alone can produce it and by no other 
argument can he be persuaded. A profit- 
able market only will not suffice, how- 
ever. His right to the game which he has 
produced must be protected just as fully 
as is his right to his chickens, ducks, 
turkeys and other domestic animals. If 
grouse, quail and pheasants are to be 
plentiful the farmers must provide suit- 
able covers, supply food when needed 
and keep down the vermin. This involves 
labor and expense which he will not un- 
dertake unless he knows that the birds 



he has raised are just as much his prop- 
erty as his chickens, ducks and turkeys, 
and that when he has produced them 
he can sell them in the market at a profit. 
There is no thickly populated country 
in the world where game is plentiful ex- 
cept where the ownership of the land- 
owner in the game upon his lands is fully 
recognized and the game has a market 
value. The existing laws which prohibit 
poaching on posted land are wholly in- 
adequate to meet the situation. No one 
should be permitted to shoot the farmer's 
game without his permission, and ade- 
quate penalty should be provided which 
would fully protect him. If such laws 
were enforced there would be game 
a-plenty for every one in a few years. 
The farmer would be benefited and so 
would the sportsman, as shooting rights 
could be obtained at small cost. Why not 
go to the root of the matter and pass 
laws that would stimulate production 
rather than restrictive laws which dis- 
courage it." 



NOTES FROM THE GAME BREEDERS AND PRESERVES. 

Importation of Eggs from China. 



I thought it might be of some interest 
to your readers to know that pheasant 
eggs have been successfully imported 
direct from China, and while hatches 
have not been anything to brag about, 
we have some pretty good looking young 
pheasants from some of these eggs. I 
had a friend who was visiting some 
friends near Canton, China, and while 
there he wrote me a letter. This was in 
March this year. He jokingly asked me 
if I couldn't use some "Honest to God 
pheasant eggs," and I promptly wrote 
him to get me some and I would, stand 
for the costs. He sent me three batches 
of the eggs, I think the first lot was 78 
eggs. These arrived in May and hatched 
reasonably well. I believe I have about 
34 birds from this lot. The next lot of 
eggs, 56, were delayed somewhere on the 
route, and while a few of them hatched, 
the chicks were so weak that all but two 
died. The last lot came in July, and it 



was pretty hot, I tell you. I was about 
to throw them away, but we had a good 
many setting hens at that time, so i set 
them, but these birds were very weak and 
I do not think I have over a dozen left, 
but they are nice so far, although they 
are but a week old. It has not been so 
many years since the first Chinese pheas- 
ants were liberated here in Oregon, and 
they were probably the first in the United 
States. It is a fact that most of the birds 
in this country at the present time are 
related considerably, and it was with this 
in view that we undertook to import 
these eggs. I do not think it is practical 
to import them, but a few of us breeders 
living here in the "Far West" are sure 
more favorably located to do this than 
anyone else. 

I do not think we will have any eggs 
for sale from this stock the coming year, 
but if we do we will advertise them in 
The Game Breeder. 






174 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Lepidium Virginicum. 

We are reliably informed by Mr. Mc- 
Atee that a weed which we observed the 
young quail in the garden at the Long 
Island Game Breeders' Association farms 
were eating is Lepidium Virginicum. 
We shall always admire this weed in the 
future, and when we have a quail garden 
of our own, as we hope to have soon, we 
shall let some of these weeds grow with 
the garden vegetables ; not too many to 
interfere with the beans, the melons and 
other foods, but enough to feed a few 
hundred young quail. 

The Game Breeder with the publica- 
tion of this item evidently assumes quite 
a scientific character which may develop 
rapidly as more of our readers study 
their birds, ascertain what they eat and 
report the facts. 

Lepidium Virginicum, we are told, is 
one of the mustard family. No doubt it 
is a fine stomach tonic for the little quail 
on a cold, rainy morning, many of which 
our young quail encountered this season. 
We have not learned yet the common or 
popular name for this Lepidium, but we 
are after it and our readers shall have it. 
It is quite certain that for quail gardens 
where hundreds of quail are reared this 
plant is more beneficial than one more 
game law putting the quail on the song 
bird list would be. 



Trouble with Turkeys. 

One of our Illinois readers writes : "I 
would like to get some information on 
turkey raising. My hatch this spring 
produced twenty Narragansett turkeys 
out of twenty eggs. These turkeys were 
pretty well for about two weeks until 
they contracted some disease. Some of 
them would circle around in a ring a 
number of times a day and develop a 
swelling on the neck. The next day 
they would droop around and drop their 
wings, refuse to eat, and the next day 
they would die. In this way I lost all of 
them. I am positive they were free from 
lice. 

If I can get any information on this 
matter I shall be very much pleased. 

(It seemed to us that the trouble probably 
was black-head, a well known and fatal dis- 



ease due to the contact with domestic fowls. 
—Editor.) 

Dr. Philip Hadley, of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Rhode Island State 
College, says : 

"It is impossible accurately to diagnose 
the disease mentioned by your corre- 
spondent without additional data on the 
pathological conditions present. Young 
poults affected with any of the common 
diseases act about the same way that he 
describes. The swelling of the neck is 
the only point that is suggestive, and may 
mean a mild manifestation of the "bal- 
loon disease." This is concerned with 
the cervical, thoracic or abdominal air 
sacs. They enlarge, take air from the 
lungs and the bird usually dies from a 
condition similar in many ways to suffo- 
cation. 

The cause probably lies in low vitality 
of the stock coupled with chilling or 
damping. I know of no remedy for the 
trouble. The best thing is to prevent it 
by securing vigorous stock and using all 
the usual means to prevent chilling and 
damping. 

The Use of Maggots. 

Many of the older English authors 
and some of the later ones say that mag- 
gots are desirable food for young pheas- 
ants. Some of the writers describe how 
maggots easily can be produced in large 
quantities. I believe, however, most 
keepers where insect food is plentiful do 
not use any maggots. The only Ameri- 
can "shoot" in which I ever had any per- 
sonal interest which used maggots was 
one where I shot pheasants and ruffed 
grouse. The land was very suitable to 
grouse and they seemed to respond nice- 
ly to the little care given to them by the 
keepers. There was quite a good crop of 
grouse. But the land was not suitable 
for pheasants, much of it being moun- 
tainous and. rocky and dry ; there was a 
decided shortage of grasshoppers and 
other insects suitable for young pheas- 
ants. Hence the keepers used maggots, 
and I believe I have recorded a remark- 
able accident which resulted in the loss 
of practically all the young pheasants. A 
heavy hen jumped on the rim of a big 






THE GAME BREEDER 



175 



pail full of maggots. The pail was stand- 
ing on a hillside and easily was tipped 
over. The young birds were killed by 
eating large numbers of fresh maggots. 
There can be no doubt that maggots 
are excellent food for young birds when 
they are properly prepared and fed spar- 
ingly. They seem to be quite necessary 
in places where there are no insects. 
Meal worms, however, always advertised 
in The Game Breeder, would seem to be 
a clean substitute now easily procured. 
At the Long Island Game Breeders' As- 
sociation and in fact at the many game 
farms and preserves I have visited the in- 
sects seem to be sufficiently abundant 
and maggots are never used. It is well 
to know how to secure maggots, how- 
ever, since in a very dry season there 
may be a shortage of insects, which 
would make it quite necessary to use 
some substitute. 



How to Raise Maggots. 

Mr. Gene M. Simpson, of Oregon, a 
very successful breeder of pheasants, 
always uses the larvae of the common 
blue fly (maggots). When this food is 
used, he says, "nothing else need be fed, 
except greens occasionally. However, 
the chick food or cracked wheat should 
be kept before them that they may learn 
to eat it and be prepared to adapt them- 
selves to the whole wheat diet when the 
larvae food has been discontinued, which 
should be done gradually. The objec- 
tion to the larvae food is the offensive 
odor ordinarily associated with it. This 
must be overcome by raising the larvae 
scientifically. Contrary to the common- 
ly accepted idea, the larvae of the fly pre- 
fer fresh to decaying meat. Professor 
McGillivray, of Queen's University, To- 
ronto, who has successfully raised ring- 
neck pheasants, says: "Our investiga- 
tion and study of entomology prove to 
us that maggots, separated from their 
usual surroundings, are just as clean and 
odorless as young chickens. Flies do not 
lay their eggs on tainted meat when fresh 
meat can be found, and maggots are 
clean feeders from choice and thrive 
best on fresh meat." 

If the following method is employed. 



there will be little or no odor. Secure a 
quantity of green bone and meat trim- 
mings coarsely ground together. Take 
a tin pan with straight sides at least three 
inches deep and cover bottom with shorts, 
bran or fine dirt, preferably bran, as the 
shorts have a tendency to pack. On this 
place the bone and meat mixture and 
leave where the flies may have access to 
it. In warm weather the fly eggs will 
hatch in about two days' time and the 
bone mixture will be partially dried up. 
The larvae are adverse to strong light 
and will be found to have gone to the 
bran. They must now have something 
to feed upon. Remove the bone mixture 
and place thin slices of fresh liver on the 
bran. Turn the bone mixture back on 
top of the slices of liver. In a few hours 
the larvae will all leave the bone mixture 
and be under and feeding upon the liver. 
After this the bone mixture should be 
thrown away. In a day's time the liver 
will be eaten to shreds and -must be re- 
newed with a fresh supply of thinly 
sliced liver or fresh meat, and so on each 
day until the larvae are practically full 
grown. This will take nearly a week's 
time and they may then be fed to the 
young pheasants. The larvae must be 
fed on liver or meat as long as they are 
on hand. As soon as they are matured 
they will descend into the bran or dirt 
and change into the pupa state. In feed- 
ing the liver or meat, feed only enough 
to be consumed in twenty-four hours' 
time. The assimilating power of the 
larvae is so great that it can change every 
particle of meat or liver (except fibre) 
to larvae, consequently there can be no 
smell. The object in cutting the liver 
or meat thin is that it all may be con- 
sumed before having time to become 
tainted. Keep an extra supply of liver 
in a cool place, and a little charcoal, such 
as is used to feed chickens, sprinkled over 
and under it, will tend to keep it fresh. 
Readers who do not find it necessary 
to use larvae because there are plenty of 
insects in their fields will do well to write 
to the Spratt's Patent, Limited, Newark, 
New Jersey, and ask for their little book- 
let on feeding and rearing pheasants. All 
the game keepers in America use the 
Spratts foods, and many of them sue- 



176 



THE GAME BREEDER 



cessfully rear thousands of pheasants 
every season. Beginners should write 
and get a little food before they purchase 
young pheasants. Often they come to 
the office of the Game Breeder to inquire 
about food for pheasants. 

Long, Long Time on the Way. 

A Western reader writes we are satis- 
fied if we wait for the State to furnish 
good shooting we will have a long time 
to wait. We will take the advice of The 
Game Breeder and start something. 

There is plenty of room. Do not be 
afraid that anyone will call you a duke 
or a lord if you provide good shooting 
for a lot of guns in a place where there 
would be none without the farmers' per- 
mission. If anyone calls you names tell 
him to go to — well, anywhere. The old 
song, "Shoo fly, don't bother me," can be 
sung for his entertainment to advantage. 

How to Do It. 

The State Departments are doing the 
best they can. They cannot perform an 
impossibility. The farms are posted. The 
farmers insist that game wardens must 
protect them against trespassers. The 
necessity for sportsmen taking our ad- 
vice and combining to share the expense 
of some good quail and grouse shooting 
is evident. Quail shooting is the cheap- 
est and the best. The dues in some of 
the quail clubs are only $15 to $25 per 
year, and the good shooting and the food 
obtai'ned are well worth the money. 

Be sure and employ some one, at least 
part of the time, to control the enemies 
of the game and see that the birds have 
a little brush or other cover at the fences, 
and that a little food be planted and left 
standing. Stop shooting after you have 
shot a few hundred quail and find there 
are only enough stock birds left for 
breeding purposes. If you want a few 
pheasants in order to have a mixed bag, 
our advertisers will send them promptly 
?nd insure live delivery if you pay a lit- 
tle extra for the insurance. 

If for any reason your breeding stock 
gets too low drop a line to the nearest 
game farmer advertising in The Game 
Breeder, and he will repair the loss. 



Treat the farmer right, shoot in an or- 
derly manner and take our word for it 
you will not sell the bird dogs or will 
purchase some more if you have already 
quit the game in disgust and have sold 
Fido and Don. 

If you find any kickers in the neigh- 
borhood, inivte them into the game ; give 
them some good shooting ; point out some 
posted farms and tell them to get busy. 
Arrange for the sale of some game if 
necessary to keep expenses down. You 
will make the people who eat it good 
friends of field sports. 

Glad to Support the Game Breeder. 

The Marmot Pheasantry writes : Con- 
tinue the same space for another year. 
We are glad to support the movement, 
and The Game Breeder has brought re- 
sults. In fact, we have been unable to 
fill even a small portion of our orders 
for ring-necks. Week before last we re- 
turned a check for $2,000 because we 
could not fill the order, 

We never have been able to establish 
a market for the ornamental birds and 
are nearly disgusted with them. 

(We are advising the new game shooting 
clubs to purchase some ornamental birds as a 
side line and some of the owners of country 
places also are doing so. The demands for 
sporting birds always will be larger than the 
demand for aviary species, but we believe the 
demand for the last named will increase. — 
Editor.) 

Good News. 

One of our readers who went into the 
service, as many did, writes : 'We sold 
out everything that we had in the line 
of birds. We are looking for a .farm, 
and as soon as we find one that will suit 
our requirements we will start fixing it 
up for next season, and we will raise 
more birds than ever before. We will 
have a full line of fancy birds and ducks. 

I hope soon to place my ads. in The 
Game Breeder, as we found that we re- 
ceived more inquiries through your paper 
than from any other. I will take pleas- 
ure in letting you know how we are get- 
ting along, as I know you always are in- 
terested in hearing from the - various 
game breeders in this country. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



177 



There seems to be a very large demand 
as we have received a great number of 
inquiries for both eggs and birds, and 1 
should think that another year would see 
the demand increased, as there will be 
more going into game breeding when all 
fohe boys get out of the service. 

Egg Importations. 

A number of breeders report that they 
will import some eggs of various species 
next season. Possibly eggs again will 
come in good numbers from England, as 
they did before the war. We are inclined 
to believe, however, there are more 
pheasants in America than there are in 
England and that both pheasant and 
wild duck eggs will be produced next 
season in sufficient numbers to fully sup- 
ply the demand. Some of the places 
which now have hundreds of breeding 
birds will have thousands, and places 
which were regarded as big a few years 
ago will have to move rapidly if they 
keep up with some of the new commer- 
cial farms which we are told will be 
started with an abundance of capital. 

Some of them already are asking for 
the rates for advertising space. 

New Customers. 

The Game Breeder sees the importance 
of creating many new shooting custom- 
ers for the advertisers. Although the 
business is so good now that some say 
they do not find advertising at all neces- 
sary, if the creation of game farms only 
is promoted and no shooting clubs are 
created to take their products the busi- 
ness soon will be overdone. 

The State game officers have been 
stimulated to become good customers by 
the "more game and fewer game laws" 
breeze, but the limit of their capacity 
soon will be reached, since in many 
States there are State game farms in- 
tended to produce all the eggs and birds 
needed. 

Our activity will largely be devoted to 
creating new shooting customers. We 
have plans for several in hand now, in 
as many States, and all will need stock 
birds and eggs, which will be purchased 
from our advertisers if they heed our ad- 



vice and help those who have made game 
breeding possible by supporting the 
cause with their advertising. 



Peculiar Industry. 

It seems peculiar to some advertisers 
that the game protectionists and "other- 
wise than by shooting" enthusiasts are so 
eager to pursuade them not to advertise 
their game birds. The reason why re- 
wards are offered to people to induce 
them to desert the cause and its magazine 
should be evident. The arguments are 
plausible and the time given to them indi- 
cates the alarm which exists. We man- 
age to keep well posted on the perform- 
ances of people who are in favor of game 
farming but opposed to game shooting. 
We know that the shooting is the induce- 
ment to production. The Game Conserv- 
ation Society is the only society actively 
engaged in creating new shooting clubs 
and in planning country places for their 
owners so that they will produce game in 
abundance for shooting. 

We can see the necessity for short sea- 
sons, small bags and even for putting 
quail and grouse on the song bird list. 
We do not oppose such legislation, but 
ask simply that a clause be added stating 
that game-shooting customers as well as 
game farmers be excepted from the laws 
intended to save the vanishing State 
game. 

We prefer to see the quail season kept 
open for everybody, as it is on Long 
Island, New York, where the quail clubs 
not only keep up the quail supply on 
their grounds, owned or rented for 
shooting, but also on other lands open 
to the public. 

Often we have pointed out that the 
noisy game refuge is better than any 
quiet refuge where shooting is prohib- 
ited. The noisy places provide good 
shooting for all the guns the land can 
carry and more than could safely shoot 
on the area were it not for the practical 
protection given to the game. Quiet 
refuges only add to the number of farms 
posted against shooting, and we think 
there are enough of these in most of the 
States. The number evidently is in- 
creasing. Few sportsmen now insist 



178 



THE GAME BREEDER 



that others should not provide shooting 
on places where there was none and 
never would be any without industry. 
The Dukes and Lords argument ad- 
vanced by game politicians and profes- 
sional game savers became a back num- 
ber when the inexpensive quail clubs 
proved how easy it is to have inexpensive 
shooting in States where the quail is not 
a song bird. They have been able to 
keep the bird off of the song bird list and 
always will be able to keep the quail 
shooting good. 

To get back to advertising. The Game 
Breeder only wants advertisers who get 
results and who are willing honestly to 
stand up for the right and sustain a good 
cause, which surely has put game breed- 
ing on the map and which promises 
quickly to make North America the big- 
gest game producing country in the 

world. 

• 

The Game Market. 

Reports coming to The Game Breeder 
indicate that the fall market for live 
game opened strong with comparatively 
few birds being offered, although many 
more birds have been reared this season 
than ever before — many thousands more. 

Breeders seem to be waiting to see 
what the prices are and we have many 
inquiries, both in the mail and from pre- 
serve owners, game-shooting club mem- 
bers and commercial dealers who call at 
the office when in New York. 

Several small breeders who have been 
in recently said they had from three to 
eight hundred pheasants. All seemed 
disinclined to say just what their price 
was and they wished us to suggest the 
figure. A few who desired to sell part 
of their birds quickly, intending to hold 
the rest for better prices, suggested $4 
for hen pheasants and $3 for cocks. 
There was one offer of a lot of cock 
birds as low as $2 each. Shooting clubs 
should take up birds at this price quickly 
since they will sell readily for $2.50 each 
in the market after the shooting and 
probably for more. 

We predict that the price soon will be 
$5 for hens and $3 and $4 for cocks 
and that it will go up as the season ad- 
vances. 



There is much uncertainty, however, 
since the crop reported throughout the 
country is very large and if many of the 
big breeders, who have large numbers of 
birds, should decide to sell promptly and 
not wait for better prices the market 
might be temporarily affected. We know 
about eighty new places, shooting clubs 
and shooting places owned by individuals 
who want a good lot of birds, that we 
feel confident that every bird offered in 
The Game Breeder will be sold at a sat- 
isfactory price. 

The cost ' of labor and feed having 
been high, the birds must bring good 
prices and we are sure they will. 

Aviary Species. 

The prices of ayiary species are about 
the same as last season. There seems 
to be as much variation in price as there 
was last year. Some breeders having 
an unusually successful lot of one or 
more species being willing to dispose of 
them at a reasonable price. 

We have letters from game-clubs and 
preserve owners which indicate that they • 
have decided to take our advice and pur- 
chase some aviary species as a side line. 
There seems to be a strong demand for 
Reeves, due no doubt to our suggestion 
that a few of these would look well in 
the bag. Several new "shoots" will give 
them a trial. We have a new scheme 
which will put up the prices when we 
announce it, as we will soon with some 
illustrations. 

Wild Ducks. 

There seems to be even more uncer- 
tainty about the duck prices than there 
is about pheasants. The liberal oppor- 
tunities for trapping ducks, under the 
Federal permits which cost nothing, sug- 
gests that large numbers of ducks prob- 
ably have been trapped and many more 
will be when the birds come from the 
north. There are hundreds of places 
where skilled labor is employed which 
are visited by wild fowl, attracted by the 
birds bred on the ground and by the 
abundant food, and were it not for the 
fact that we have started a lot of new 
places we would be inclined to think that 



THE GAME BREEDER 



]79 



the ducks might have become so abun- 
dant as to affect the price. 

Commercial breeders and game shoot- 
ing clubs which intend to breed a big 
lot of ducks for sport want ducks that 
will lay eggs and it is well known that 
freshly trapped ducks will not usually 
do so the first season. Mr. Dusette, of 
Bad Axe, Michigan, who is one of the 
biggest breeders of ducks, has the right 
idea and brands all young ducks as re- 
quired by the Federal regulation so that 
they can be shot at any time after their 
purchase. 

Readers no doubt have observed the 
offering of teal of Mr. Klein, of Kansas. 
The price seemed to us to be low, but 
no one can say until more reports are 
in just how many teal and other wild 
ducks have been trapped and how many 
will be taken and sold in October and 
November. The duck business soon 
would be badly overdone were it not for 
the fact that we are starting new shoot- 
ing clubs where a very large number of 
ducks will be shot next fall. Game farm- 
ers who have teal and other ducks war- 
ranted to lay eggs will quickly sell al! 
the birds they may offer and we would 
strongly advise game farmers to put as 
many ducks as possible into the proper 
condition to lay eggs since the future 
demand, we are sure, will be for egg- 
producers. The eggs of species other 
than the mallard all will demand much 
better prices than the common stock duck 
eggs. 

Wild Geese. 

The prices of wild geese remain about 
the same as last year. The demand from 
those who know the game is for mated 
pairs warranted to lay eggs. Fresh 
trapped geese probably will be abundant 
and cheap. But this of course depends 
on how many geese have been trapped 
and how extensive the trapping will be 
next fall. 

Sportsmen who were opposed to trap- 
ping wild birds for breeding purposes 
rapidly have been converted to the idea 
that it is a good thing to do. The more 
wild fowl bred on club grounds and 
country places the better it will be for 



all hands, since more birds will go out 
from such places where the shooting is 
lively than will ever be seen to leave a 
quiet refuge. The sportsmen who shoot 
the abundant birds they produce leave 
a lot of good shooting for those who are 
not industrious. Since the market for 
fowl is good anyone can get into the 
game by forming a shooting club. The 
sale of part of the birds shot will keep 
the expenses down. Almost anyone can 
breed wild ducks successfully. They are 
the best birds for beginners. A very 
small pond, natural or artificial, is big 
enough for a few hundred duck. 

Wood Duck. 

There have been some inquiries for 
wood ducks and the price seems to vary 
much, from $10 a pair up. The doubt 
which seems to exist as to the right of 
owners of wood duck to shoot their birds 
naturally checks the increase of this 
species. We have no doubt that an 
owner who produces wood duck and 
shoots some of them for his table or even 
for sale is clearly within his rights, "in 
order to increase the food supply," as 
the section preventing any interference 
with game farms and preserves reads. 
It would seem peculiar to arrest a food 
producer just now because the food was 
utilized. Since wood duck, no doubt, 
will be shot at some of the places before 
long, the matter may possibly be passed 
on by a court. We think it would be a 
good plan to arrange for an amicable 
case if those in authority have any 
doubts about the matter. A wood duck 
can be shot and a case made up which 
the court no doubt would decide quickly, 
both sides being ready and friendly. The 
writer would be willing to be the goat. 

There can be no doubt there will be 
a very big demand for the acorn or sum- 
mer duck as soon as all doubts about its 
shooting status are determined. The 
bird is one of the best wild food birds in 
the world. It is easily bred beside 
wooded ponds, and where acorns or 
other wild foods are plentiful it can be 
produced in good numbers cheaply. The 
flesh is delicious and the shooting should 
open in August. 



180 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Since the wood duck is such excellent 
food it will quickly become tremendously 
abundant when the sportsmen are sure 
that it will pay to get busy. 

Buffaloes. 

There seems to be only a very small 
demand for bison and the market would 
seem to be over supplied. As a sporting 
animal they have seen their best days. 
Vast plains and very wild buffaloes 
which tested the capacity of good horses 
were just right for sport, but no one 
cares to shoot a buffalo in a park and the 
meat is not very desirable. 

The offering of Mr. Leach in the 
August Game Breeder is the only offer 
of bison which has come to our notice 
recently, and we have not yet had a re- 
port as to the result from the adver- 
tisement. 

Near Mallards. 

The near mallard, which was pur- 
chased and shot in large numbers when 
nothing else could be had, suffered from 
the comments about its bad behavior on 
many shoots and now that more speedy 
birds are obtainable there is small de- 
mand for the slow ducks. Breeders 
have introduced trapped birds to advan- 
tage and have much improved the char- 
acter of their birds where any near mal- 
lards were held for breeding purposes. 

Northern Quail. 

The few northern quail offered 
brought almost any price the breeder 
chose to ask for them. Many are held 
for breeding purposes and are not for 
sale. 

Mexican Quail. 

Mexican quail no doubt will sell well 
as soon as the authorities are willing to 
open the market for this food bird. 
There have been many complaints about 
the arbitrary rulings limiting the open 
season for importations. It seems in- 
comprehensible that any objections 
should be made to food production. The 
fact that the price of the food is high 
should not affect the matter because there 
are people who will pay good prices and 



they leave the less expensive foods for 
others, and also the food quickly will 
become cheap when it becomes very 
abundant, as it surely will. 

Those who advertised quail in The 
Game Breeder all reported they were 
swamped with orders and were obliged 
to return a lot of money. They report 
that on account of a dry season the quail 
seem to be scarce and that they hold 
enough orders to take all the birds they 
expect to get, and those whose orders 
were in last season must be supplied first. 
It seems likely that bob-whites will sell 
for $30 a dozen. Scaled and Gambel's 
will bring lower prices until experiments 
made by the Long Island Game Breeders' 
Association and other shooting clubs we 
have persuaded to give these birds a 
trial report if the birds can be estab- 
lished and made a good sporting propo- 
sition in. the north. The price meantime 
will be $15 or $20 for these birds and 
perhaps more. 

The Long Island Association will shoot 
these birds for a second time the coming 
season, but so few birds were obtained 
last year that it is uncertain if they have 
been established as wild breeding birds. 
A few wintered quite near the house 
and we have a report of one being seen 
by a careful observer fifteen miles away 
and others nearer the preserve. We 
never have had much confidence in ex- 
periments made with only a few birds, 
especially on a ground where the shoot- 
ing is opened too soon. 

Deer. 

The price of deer is a little higher than 
last year ; $25 to $35 each. 

Rabbits. 

Often we have requests for informa- 
tion as to where cotton-tails can be pro- 
cured. Usually these requests come 
from quail clubs and other owners of 
upland "shoots." 

It would seem that since rabbits are 
so abundant as to be a pest in some parts 
of the country that there should be plenty 
of them for sale at reasonable prices. 
They are a good animal to introduce and 
keep plentiful on any shooting ground, 



THE GAME BREEDER 



181 



not only on account of the sport with 
the beagles, but also because they are a 
well known protection to quail. They 
are, as Owen Jones said, the foxes' bread 
and butter. He can take them more 
easily than he can take quail and pos- 
sibly he enjoys the fun of chasing them. 
It is next to impossible to control all 
the foxes in most places. They seem to 
keep coming and no doubt are attracted 
by the abundant game from long dis- 
tances. 

We wish some of our advertisers who 
sell rabbits would give us the price, both 
for cotton-tails and jacks, for publica- 
tion. A little reading notice quoting 
those who wish to offer rabbits and a 
little comment about the desirability of 
our readers purchasing no doubt will 
help sell the rabbits. We will quote all 
prices furnished with the name and ad- 
dress of advertisers sending them. 

Shipping Rabbits. 

We have been asked if many rabbits 
can be shipped in one crate or if it should 
have separate compartments for each 
animal. We believe the last named 
method is deemed best. Partitions can 
be made light and cheap. 



but it is successful and interesting. It 
now has members from four States 
somewhat widely separated. We are glad 
to be able to provide and show good 
shooting to people who reside in States 
where there is none worth talking about. 



A More Game Object Lesson. 

The Experimental Game Farms and 
Shoot of the Long Island Game Breed- 
ers' Association often is visited by peo- 
ple who wish to see how the thing is done 
and to learn how to start similar places. 
This is one of the objects of the Asso- 
ciation. If America quickly is to become 
a big game producing country it is quite 
necessary that large numbers of sports- 
men should combine to share the expense 
of opening up some of the posted farms. 
The work of the Conservation Society 
largely is devoted to the creation of new 
places, the bigger the better, provided 
many guns are taken care of. 

The number of people who will visit 
this interesting shoot on Long Island will 
grow when the place has thousands of . 
birds instead of hundreds. Being an in- 
expensive place, intended as an object 
lesson, it has been obliged to go slowly, 



Editor of The Game Breeder : 

I was much interested in Mr. Perry's 
report regarding the results of eggs of 
pheasants, etc., etc., and would suggest 
your trying to get all large purchasers 
of eggs to make similar reports. Mr. 
Perry's report would have been more to 
the point if he had stated the fertility of 
his purchases. Eggs are very elusive, as 
we all know. I have had some 60 eggs 
from a short distance from my home give 
me just seven chicks ; they were brought 
by motor. Two hundred eggs carried 
carefully myself — 60 chicks, etc. Mr. 
Perry's report is again too bald. I do 
not believe it is always "transportation." 
The fertility of the pens, how that spe- 
cial mating runs as regards fertility, the 
breed, etc., etc. The losses of experi- 
ments are never told. They are carefully 
concealed from the public, the general 
public. One never gets anywhere unless 
all the ups and downs are fully aired, and 
I would again suggest your getting out 
an issue with the truth, and nothing: but 
the truth, from your various subscribers. 
One who really loves these things will 
not be discouraged by setbacks, but we 
will never advance scientifically unless 
these losses are thrashed out and some 
way discovered to test the eggs for fertil- 
ity before they are shipped. 

Jean Cowdrey Norton. 

(Mr. Norton gives very good advice. We 
hope our readers will send us notes about 
their difficulties and failures as well as notes 
about their successful operations. A game 
breeders' magazine with a trouble depart- 
ment can be made interesting and instructive. 
Remember always you like to read what others 
say and that they will read with interest what 
you say. Practically every breeder in the 
United States as well as all the shooting cus- 
tomers read the magazine: Often they say 
they are interested in the work of others. So 
send in the notes, please. — Editor.) 



182 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T^ e Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited bv DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER, 1919. 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy— $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All ForeignCountriesand Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc. 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

E). W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 
E. Dayton, Advertising Manager. 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



lation will be largely increased. Sample 
attempts in this direction easily indicate 
that a large circulation quickly will be 
obtained. Those who read the magazine 
continually procure new readers. Those 
who have birds or eggs to sell report 
splendid results and many advertisements 
come unsolicited. 

The opportunities for excellent sport 
soon will be much increased. Sport for 
all classes has nothing to fear from a 
great abundance of game, which seems 
to be assured. The sales of ammunition, 
guns, dogs and the appliances for game 
breeding soon will indicate the value of 
the movement for "more game." 



THE GAME BREEDING 
OUTLOOK. 

The Game Breeder soon will have a 
younger and more active editor. Look- 
ing back over the work accomplished we 
feel that it has been fairly well done and 
looking at the vast food producing in- 
dustry which is now country-wide, we 
take some satisfaction in the thought 
that the words "more game and fewer 
game laws" started a movement which 
has proved to be quite worth while. The 
wise old dean of sportsmen, the late 
Charles Hallock, when he wrote that we 
were right, predicted it would take a 
long time to overcome existing preju- 
dices and that he doubted if it would be 
possible to accomplish all that the pro- 
gram called for. The success of the 
movement is now well known to all of 
the people. 

As amended, the United States Migra- 
tory Bird Law is perfectly satisfactory. 
The Biological Survey undoubtedly is ad- 
vancing the cause of game breeding 
which is given full and ample protection 
by Section 12. There is need for an 
educational campaign in order that the 
States may all have a simple law encour- 
aging and not preventing the profitable 
production of all species of game. 

The Game Breeder now can be made 
much better than it has been. Its circu- 



BUFFALOES, GROUSE AND 
GAME OWNERSHIP. 

There are a little over 3,000 bison or 
buffaloes in the United States. Approx- 
imately a little over 2,000 are owned by 
individuals. 

We believe we are right in saying that 
all the bison owned by governmental de- 
partments were procured by purchase 
from private owners or have been bred 
from animals so procured. Had it not 
been for game breeders the species would 
be extinct. 

A large herd of "bison was sold to Can- 
ada some years ago because no one in the 
United States wanted them. There are 
said to be about 3,500 bison in Canada, 
and we presume these figures include the 
wild wood-bison, one. of which was shot 
by the late Harry Radford on his un- 
fortunate expedition which resulted in 
his death. Some of our older readers 
will remember his account of shooting 
the wood-bison. 

A law was enacted in Colorado pro- 
tecting the buffaloes at all times while 
they still occurred in the State, but the 
animals became extinct while the law 
Was in the books. 

The prairie grouse are extinct in 
States where easily they can be restored 
and made an abundant food crop as soon 
as it is possible to procure breeding 
stock. There probably will be no de- 
mand for bison as objects of sport, but 
surely there will be, and is, a demand for 
the grouse. Fortunately many readers 



THE GAME BREEDER 



183 



of The Game Breeder are now holding 
on to a big lot of grouse, although under 
existing laws which prohibit shooting the 
birds appear not to be worth anything to 
anybody. The title to the grouse is fully 
as good as the title to the buffaloes saved 
by private breeders was and the govern- 
ment and individual purchasers recog- 
nized that it was good when they pur- 
chased bison. The largest owner who 
developed a herd from a few pair of an- 
imals made a small fortune when he sold 
them. Those who are properly looking 
after their prairie grouse and sharp-tails 
have a small fortune in sight, since the 
birds and eggs will bring better prices 
than pheasants and they can be produced 
much less expensively on the farms with- 
out any injury to farm crops. They are 
wise in taking our advice to look after 
the birds, but some are impatient at the 
law's delay in granting proper shipping 
facilities for this valuable farm product. 
They will soon thank. The Game Breeder 
for advising them to save the game, even 
if it appeared to be worthless, and they 
will soon praise it for creating a public 
sentiment which will result in their sell- 
ing birds and eggs, and will restore 
grouse shooting in States where the sport 
long has been extinct. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Editor Game Breeder : 

You say in the August issue: "We 
wish many of our readers would write 
a few lines telling us about their good 
and bad luck during the breeding sea- 
son." 

Well, then, good luck. I had a small 
"Ironclad" incubator going with 135 
Mallard eggs laid by my own birds, 
which I started on June 7th. For the 
first week of incubation the weather was 
fairly favorable for incubator work. 
Along the second week, however, we ex- 
perienced a hot spell that lasted several 
days, and during which time I had some 
difficulty in keeping the incubator COOL 
enough. Then followed a few days of 
normal weather, and after this another 
hot spell with the thermometer at 110 
degrees for days at a time. It was just 
about the most critical time, the incuba- 



tor going at 103 degrees, and I felt 
obliged to turn off the heat on more oc- 
casions than one, cooling the eggs twice 
a day for 45 minutes each, as well as 
spraying the eggs twice a day with warm 
water. When hatching day came I got 
115 ducklings out of 135 eggs, the whole 
process taking less than 24 hours ; the 
shortest time for such number I ever ex- 
perienced. Surely it was good luck, the 
more remarkable since the eggs had been 
kept several weeks before incubation. 

Now for the ill-luck, "rotten luck," to 
quote you. 

At the same time that I had started 
my small "Ironclad" which, by the way, 
I much prefer to any other make for 
hatching duck eggs, I also started an- 
other incubator with 250 Mallard eggs, 
100 of which were shipped to me by a 
western dealer. 

I am sorry to say that through misun- 
derstandings and the absence of the 
breeder these eggs were 10 weeks late in 
delivery, let alone the fact that they were 
seven days in coming a distance of less 
than 1,000 miles. At any rate, having 
tested the fertility of my own eggs, I 
had no misgivings when on June 7th I 
started both incubators with 385 eggs all 
told. The eggs came highly recommend- 
ed by one of the our most successful 
western breeders and were of a strictly 
wild stock. After less than 24 hours of 
incubation a number of these 100 eggs 
popped and I was compelled to empty 
the incubator, wash all eggs as well as 
the walls and trays of the machine in 
fear of all eggs becoming spoiled, infect- 
ed, so to speak. This performance con- 
tinued until after the end of the second 
week there were but 34 of the original 
100 eggs left, besides the 150 Mallard 
eggs of my own. I need not say that I 
was quite worried and that I did every- 
thing in my power to save the rest of the 
eggs. I kept the incubator scrupulously 
clean, being unable to obtain another one, 
when on the 24th day, in the morning, 
when I first got up and went over to see 
the incubator, I found that several of the 
remaining eggs had popped during the 
night, scattering their ill-smelling con- 
tents all over the eggs. Again I cleaned 
the incubator thoroughly, wiped the eggs 



184 



THE GAME BREEDER 



with a soft cloth dipped in warm solu- 
tion — about 1 to 10,000 boric acid and 
trusted in luck. But luck had deserted 
me in this instance, for NO EGGS 
HATCHED. Before burying the eggs 
for manure I made a hasty, very hasty 
I will say, examination of all remaining 
eggs and found most of them addled, 78 
per cent of the shipped eggs being rot- 
ten, some 18 fertile but dead in the shell, 
while approximately 89 per cent of my 
eggs in the same incubator had been fer- 
tile but spoiled as a consequence of 
poisonous gases within the incubator. 
Taking 65 per cent as a fair hatching 
average that should have given me 162 
ducklings out of 250 eggs, the potential 
value of which 162 ducklings would have 
represented over $400.00 by September, 
it was a serious blow financially as well 
as morally. 

I must here give full credit to the 
breeder who, when notified of my ill- 
luck, at once made good to the amount 
of my order by shipping corresponding 
number of live birds. 

Is this not a blue-ribbon winner for 
ill-luck ? 

Yours for more game, 

Z. Ted De Kalmar. . 

Editor Game Breeder: 

As I am a reader of your magazine, 
The Game Breeder, I would like a little 
information concerning my ring-necked 
pheasants. 



REMINGTON ANIMAL CHART. 

The Remington natural history chart of 
game animals, just issued, combines artistic 
interest and educational value to a degree sel- 
dom accomplished in advertising. It is in 
the form of an art hanger for display in 
sporting goods stores, hardware stores and 
sportsmen's clubhouses, and is reproduced by 
the lithographic process from a full-color 
drawing by Charles Livingston Bull. The 
artist, who enjoys a deservedly high reputa- 
tion for the distinguished, accurate and artis- 
tic character of his work, perhaps has never 
yet finished a drawing so interesting, and it 
surely will add measurably to his renown. 

Thirty-one different North American species 
are shown, the range being from the cotton- 
tail rabbit to the giant Alaska brown bear. 
They are placed in groups, appropriate to 
geographical distribution and character of the 
animals, are shown among their natural sur- 




roundings, and many are in action. To those 
veterans .of the hunting trail who have made 
first-hand acquaintance with many of them 
it will be at once apparent that pains have 
been taken to display the natural characteris- 
tics of the animals in point of drawing and 
coloring. 

In addition to the animals, there is an at- 
tractive and accurate full-color drawing of a 
target range with a group of shooters enjoy- 
ing their sport of shooting bull's-eyes with the 
small-bore rifle, the pistol and the military 
rifle. 



Recommended Cartridges. 

As embellishments, there are full-color illus- 
trations of the four most popular Remington 
auto-loading and slide-action repeating rifles, 
and forty-four most popular ball cartridges 
manufactured by Remington U. M. C. Rifles 
and cartridges, like the animals, are all care- 
fully marked for identification, and to a cer- 
tain extent the arrangement indicates the 
sizes of cartridges recommended as being most 
suitable for use in hunting the various game 
animals. 

The new hanger will be supplied to every 
Remington U. M. C. dealer, of which there 
are more than 82,700 in this country. In addi- 
tion, sportsmen's clubs and hunters' resorts 
will receive them, and no doubt a certain 
number will find their way into the homes of 
individual sportsmen. 



Good Cause for Delight. 

A Red Cross man in the recreation 
room of one of the Debarkation Hospi- 
tals offered to send a telegram home for 
a returning wounded soldier. This is 
what the boy dictated : "Debarked, de- 
loused, delighted. Jim." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



185 



mm 



s'm 



Wild Mallard ,Ducks 
and Ringneck Pheasants 

WRITE TOR PRICES 



Scarboro Beach Game Farm 

R. E. BULLOCK, Manager 

SCARBORO, - MAINE 

Member of the Game Guild 

We furnish Eggs in Season 



SsMMm^m mmm 



t'.Vy.H. 



F. B. DUSETTE & SONS' GAME RANCH 



BAD AXE, MICH. 

= BREEDERS OF — 



Pure Wild Mallards, Black Ducks, 
Wild Turkeys and Bob White Quail 

Our game is grown on our 240- Acre Ranch, with natural feed on 
our Several Lakes, which makes our stock very attractive for 
Breeders, Shooting Clubs and Preserve Owners at a minimum 
price. Our birds comply with the Federal regulations which 
permit shooting andfsale. 

Contracts Now Open for August and September 
No Eggs for Sale This Season 

F. B. DUSETTE & SONS, BAD AXE, MICH. 



186 



THE GAME BREEDER 



9 <*■ ^«-** 

and. 

jA;paxB.ecse-srilkle« '. 

Pure-bred Birds Raised Under Semi-Natural Conditions 
Z. TED DeKALMAR, R. F. D. No. 30, Stamford, Conn. 

STATE GAME LICENSE No 123. FEDERAL PERMIT No. 1. 



RIVER LAWN GAME FARM 

R. H. SIDWAY 
GRAND ISLAND, ERIE CO., N. Y. 

Young Pheasants for Fall delivery 
extra fine, healthy non-related birds. 

My birds are raised for my own shooting and are very strong 

on the wing. 

Member of The Game Guild. Member American Game Breeders Society. 



♦ THE HONEYSWEET 

BLACK RASPBERRY 

Best for Home and Market 

The bushes make good cover for game. 

Strawberry and Asparagus Plants. 

Price Lists Free. 

A. B. KATKAMIER MACEDON, N. Y. 



jsk. 


BOOK ON 


TOE^ 


DOG DISEASES 


\*Wlr 


And How to Feed 


America's 

Pioneer 

Dog Medicines 


Mailed free to any address by 
the Author 

H. CLAY GLOVER CO., Inc., 
118 West 31st Street, New York 



Elkhorn Park, consisting of 40 Acres under nine foot fence. 

Eight Buffaloes, seven Elk, Four black and three white English Fallow Deer, 
ten Japanese Sika Deer and a number of fawns and calves belonging to the 
Deer and Elk. 

Cy. DeVry said of my Game: "You have the finest band of Elk I ever saw, and ybur Buffaloes are equally fine." 

Price for Land and Game $14,000. 

Reason for selling, I have been given eight months yet to live. This " ad " is for immediate sale and will 
not appear again. WARREN R. LEACH. Rushville, Ills. 



(Our readers will regret to learn of the illness of Mr. Leach, who has written some excellent 
articles for the Game Breeder and has sold many deer to readers of the magazine. — Editor). 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gsme." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



187 



Blue-Winged Teal 

I AM prepared to furnish Blue- 
Winged Teal to Game Breeders 
at the following prices in lots of ten 
or more pairs at $2.75 per pair. 
Single pairs at $4.00 per pair. 

Also a few other varieties such 
as Mallards, Pintails, Green-Winged 
Teal, Spoonbills, Coots, at very at- 
tractive prices. 

The Game Breeder has done more 
for the propagation of birds than 
any other magazine. I believe every 
Game Breeder should support the 
paper for this cause. 

Geo. J. Klein 

Breeder and Dealer in all kinds of Birds 

Ellinwood, Kansas 



Galvanized Steel 
Wire Netting" 

For Fox Farms, Game 
Farms and Preserves. 

We are prepared to quote lowest prices 
for all widths up to 72 inches from H to 2 
inch mesh, and No. 14 to 20 gauge. We can 
guarantee prompt deliveries to any point. 

If you are going to start a game ranch, 
farm or preserve this year, or contemplate 
enlarging your old one, get our prices be- 
fore placing your order elsewhere. 

Price list on application, estimate, freight 
paid if you will send specifications of what 
you require. 

Fenimore Havcrslick & Co., Inc. 
1 09 Chancery St., Trenton, N. J. 



CD v 

J rzceUist on. 




•eeuist 
^Sipplica lion 





THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS 

of BERRY, KENTUCKY 

offer for sale, Setters and Pointers, Fox and Cat Hounds, Wolf 
and Deer Hounds, Coon and Opossum Hounds, Varmint and 
Rabbit Hounds, Bear and Lion Hounds, also Airedale terriers. 
All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser alone to judge the quality, 
satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. Sixty-eight page, 
highly illustrated, instructive, and interesting catalogue for 
ten cents in stamps or coin. 



WILD DUCK POODS 

Wild Celery, Sago Pond Weed. Widgeon Grass, Red-Head Grass, Chara and other foods which 
attract water fowl. We have the best duck foods which will attract and hold the game and which 
impart the finest flavor to the flesh. We plan and arrange the plantings suitable to all waters. 

GOOD SHOOTING 

DURING THE OPEN SEASON 

I am prepared to entertain a number of sportsmen who wish to shoot wild geese, Canvasback and 
other wild ducks and quail, snipe, etc. Only small parties can be properly looked after. Appoint- 
ments to try the shooting and learn about the wild duck foods are made by correspondence. 

J. B. WHITE WATERLILY, CURRITUCK SOUND, NORTH CAROLINA 

Member of THE GAME GUILD 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



188 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE 



It Is Now Legal to Trap Wild 
Fowl for Breeding Purposes . 

Write to The Biological Survey, Washington, D. C, for information about Trapping Permits 

The book, OUR WILD FOWL AND WADERS, written by the 
Editor of The Game Breeder, contains full information about the 
trapping of wild fowl and how to rear the birds for profit and 
for sport. There are chapters on How to Form Shooting Clubs ; 
How to Control the Enemies of Wild Fowl, etc. Fully illustrated 
with pictures of ducks on preserves, etc 

.PRICE, #2.00 POSTPAID 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau St., NEW YORK 




PROFITS IN FUR FARMING 

Learn about the wonderful Black Fox 
Industry which has proven so profitable 
to breeders. 

Read the Black Fox Magazine, the only 
paper of its kind in the world. 

SAMPLE COPY FREE. 
Subscription $1.50 per year. 

THE BLACK FOX MAGAZINE 

15 Whitehall Street, New York 



Decoy Owls for Crow 
and Hawk Shooting 



Established 1860 
Telephone 4569 Spring 



Fred Sauter 

Leading Taxidermist of America 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door 



Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 



Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



189 




PURE. &R.ED WiL%T\< =<U' 



Wc Arc Now 

Booking 

Orders for 

Eggs 

for Spring Delivery from the following vari- 
eties of pheasants : Silver, Golden, Ringneck, 
Lady Amherst, Formosan, White, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Swinhoe, Versicolor. Impeyan, Soem- 
merring, Manchunan Eared, Melanotus, Black- 
throated Golden, Lineated and Prince of Wales. 

Also Wild Turkeys, Japanese Silkies, Long- 
tails, and Mallard Ducks. S. C. Buff Orping- 
ton and R. I. Red fowls. 

We also offer for sale five varieties of 
Peafowl. Also Crane, Swan and Fancy Ducks, 
Doves of several varieties. Deer. Jack 
Rabbits 

Send $1.00 in stamps for Colortppe Catalogue 

CHILES & COMPANY 

MT. STERLING KENTUCKY 

Member of The Game Guild 
Member of The American Game Breeders Society 



PHEASANTS WANTED 

I will buy ringnecked pheasants regardless of sex at 
long as they are strong, healthy birds, large and not 
over two years old. Will purchase small or large num- 
bers for cash. Reference by permission to the Game 
Breeder. ROBT. BOWMAN, care Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

BANTAMS — GOOD GENTLE BIRDS SUITABLE 
for quail and pheasant breeding JOHN E. DARBY, 
Prop., Maplehurst Poultry Farm, Croswell, Michigan. 

BANTAMS— WIL BERT'S FAMOUS BANTAMS. 
Forty varieties. Shipped on approval. Catalog 30. 
F. C. WTLBERT, Grand Rapids, Michigan. 



WANTED 

Twenty=Five Sportsmen 

to join me in an exclusive hunting 
and fishing club. Property in Orange 
and Sullivan Counties, N. Y., adjoin- 
ing the Hartwood Club, the Merrie- 
wold Club and the famous Chester 
W. Chapin game preserve. For par- 
ticulars, apply to 

J. S. HOLDEN, PORT JERVIS, N.Y. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
51 a year: 



FOR SALE, WELL-BRED SETTERS 

Dogs Trained for Shooting. 

Young Dogs Suitable for Training. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

THE RIVER LAWN KENNELS 

Grand Island Erie Co., New York 

Member of The Game Guild 



TAXIDERMIST 


FINEST WORK AT REASONABLE PRICES. 


Call and See for Yourself. 


JOHN MURGATROYD 


57 West 24th St., NEW YORK CITY 



PADDLE YOUR OWN CANOE. 

A slightly used Old Town canoe, 17 feet long, in 
excellent condition and with the following equipment : 
2 double paddles, 1 spoon blade, 1 straight blade, 1 pair 
single paddles, 1 sail, pair lee-boards, mast seat, 
seats, cushions, etc. Value with equipment when new, 
$100 ; owner going West, to be sold at sacrifice for $40. 
D. V. WHIPPLE, care Game Breeder. 



Pheasants, 1 4 Varieties 

For Sale — The Stock and Equipment 
of the Canadian Pheasantry, Fourteen 
Varieties of Pheasants: An excellent 
collection for Parks or Private Grounds. 
Price and Terms of Sale on Application. 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot. Ontario, Canada 



We have supplied stock, to all the large dealers 
in the United States and Canada, and we wish to 
express our appreciation of The Game Breeder as 
a means for advertising —J. B. R. 



'n writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



190 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Breeders' Cards 




GAME BIRDS AND DEER 
BREEDERS are advised to try a 
Breeders' Card similar to those oh 
this page, $5.00 per month. Dis- 
count for Yearly contracts. 

THE GAME BREEDER 
150 Nassau Street, New York 




PHEASANTS, PIGEONS AND 
EGGS. 

Pheasants, Amherst, Silver, Gold- 
en, Reeves, Mongolian, Swinhoe, 
Versicolor, Ring necks, Cochin 
Bantams, White King Pigeons. 
Eggs in Season. 

BLUE RIBBON POULTRY AND PHEASANT FARM 

Davenport Neck, Phone 655, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 

REGISTERED BLACK FOXES, 

TROUT & HARES. 

Rugged pups, bred on highest 

ranch in America. 1917 Breeding 

Record. 8 litters from 8 females. 

Also Mountain Brook Trout. Milch 

Goats. Belgium and Flemish Hares. 

BORESTONE MOUNTAIN 

FOX RANCH 

Onawa - Maine 

Member of the Game Guild. 




PHEASANT 





EGGS AND PHEASANTS 

Pheasant eggs for sale up to 
May 15, $25.00 per hundred. 
110 eggs sent for cash with 
order after May 15, $20 per 
110 eggs. Pheasants for Sep- 
tember and October delivery. 
Write for prices. GEORGE 
BEAL, Levana Game Farm, 
R No. 1, Englishtown, New 
Jersey. 



LIVE GAME/ELK, DEER, WILD 
Turkeys, Quail, Pheasants, 
Ducks, and'all other game. Eggs 
in season. See space advertise- 
ment. 

W. J. MACKENSEN.Yardley, Pa. 
Member of the Game Guild. 




PHEASANTS FOR SALE M 

Ringnecks Only 

Write for Prices 

A. BRADLEY, 

Catamount, R. F. D., 

Ossining, N. Y. 



DOMESTIC RAISED WILD 
CANADA GEESE 

Black and common Mallard ducks 

and other varieties of pure wild 

water fowl and pheasants. 

H. J. JAGER, 

Owatonna, Minn. 






BREEDER OF FANCY PHEASANTS 

Eggs in season. Amhersts, Silver, 
Golden, Versicolor, Mongolian, 
Reeves, Ringnecks, Manchurian, 
Elliott, Swinhoe, Impeyan, Mela- 
notus, Soemmering. 

GRAY'S 
GOLDEN ^ POULTRY FARM 
Gifford Gray, Orange, New Jersey 

Member of the Game Guild. 



DR. FRANK KENT 

Importer Bob White Quail 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Book your orders now for early 

Fall and Spring delivery. 

Bank references. 

Member of the Game Guild. 



SEA CLIFF PHEASANTRY 
We have nearly all, of the rare pheas- 
ants and cranes, also white, Java and 
black shouldered Japanese Peafowl. 
Mandarin ducks. Eggs in Season for 
sale. Write for prices and particu- 
lars. 

BALDWIN PALMER . 

Villa Serena, Sea Cliff, Long Island, N. Y. 

Member of the Game Guild. 6t 



GAME BIRDS AND DEER 
BREEDERS are advised to try a 
Breeders' Card similar to those on 
this page, $5.00 per month. Dis- 
count for Yearly contracts. 

THE GAME BREEDER 
150 Nassau Street, New York 

WATER FOWL. 

I can supply nearly all species 
of wild water fowl and eggs at 
attractive prices. Mallards, Pin- 
tails, Teal, Canvasbacks, Red 
Fleads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Spoonbills, Canada Geese, Snow 
Geese and other wild ducks and 
geese. Write, stating what you 
want. 

GEORGE J. KLEIN, Naturalist 
Ellinwood, Kansas 






Mallard-Pintail 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gsm« 



THE GAME BREEDER 



191 




FOR SALE-RINGNECKED PHEASANTS 
Strong, healthy birds, absolutely free from disease, good for breed- 
ing. This season laying was 4000 eggs per hundred hens. 

Write to 
AMSTON GAME CLUB 
Herbert K. Job, Secretary Amston, Conn. 





WILD TURKEYS 

Pure Bred Wild Turkeys 
Eggs in Season 

MARY WILKIE 

Beaver Dam, Virginia 

Member of the Game Guild 




I have some Ringnecks and 
Goldens for sale from this year's 
hatching. 



B. J. 
Watson Blvd. 



PROCTOR 
Kearney, Nebraska 



DARK MALLARD 
Black Duck, Mallard Hybrids 
These ducks are reared on free range 
especially for shooting and for decoys. 
They are strong on the wing. Big 
egg producers under control 
Price $3.50 per pair ; $1 .75 each 

ALBERT F. HOLMES 

8 Bosworth St., Boston, Mass. 

Member of the Game Guild 

"POSSOM HOLLOW" 
Game Park and Pheasantry 

Wild Mallards, Teals, Pintails and 
Coots; Golden, Silver, Reeves, 
Ringneck and Amherst Pheasants; 
Wild Geese, Quails. 

WM. M. ROCKEL, Jr. 
R. F. D. No. 9, Springfield, Ohi 





EGGS FOR HATCHING— PHEASANTS-ENGLISH 
Ringneck, $35.00 for 160 eggs. English Ringneck, $3.60 
per clutch. Golden, $55.00 for 160 eggs. Golden, $6.00 
per clutch. Cash with order. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
OCCONEECHEE FARM, Poultry and Game Depart- 
ment, Hillsboro, North Carolina. . 8t 

RABBIT AND HARE SOCIETY OF CANADA 

Breeders should write for constitution and by-laws. 

JOHN E. PEART, Secretary, Hamilton, Ontario. 12t 



GRAY STAR PHEASANTRY 
Breeder of all kinds of pheasants. Eggs in season. 
Pure brand, strong, healthy birds for sale. GIFFORD 
GRAY, 2i Ward St., Orange, N. J. 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANTS FOR SALE — RINGNECKS, HENS, 
$4.00; Cocks. $2.00; Silver and Golden, $8.00, per pair; 
Amherst, $15.00 per pair. All 1919 hatch. CLASSIC 
LAKE WILD FOWL FARM, L. V. Junkin, Owner, 
Manzanita, Oregon. 9. 3t 

WANTED TO BUY PHEASANTS I WANT 

Silvers. Lady Amherst. Golden and Reeves. 
Quote Prices, Ages, and Quantity. 

Morgan's. Phsntry, 244 E. 61st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

WILD TURKEYS — For prices see display advertisement 

in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 

County, Pa. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-RINGNECKS, SILVER, 
Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, Prince of Wales, Lady 
Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, Melanotus, Versicolor, Man- 
churian Eared. ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario^ 
Canada. 3t 

BREEDER IN THE WEST WHO CAN FURNISH 
Hungarian Partridges, write P. W. SCHWEHM, 
4219 4th Ave., N. E., Seattle, Wash. 

PHEASANTS AND EGGS FOR SALE. GOLDENS, 
Lady Amhersis, Versicolors, Manchurian Eared. Gold- 
en Eggs $5.00, and Lady Amherst $7.00 per dozen. 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ontario, Canada. 2t 




WILD DUCKS 
The practical rearing of wild ducks 
is fully described in the illustrated 
book, 'Our Wild Fowland Waders," 
written by the Editor of the Game 
Breeder. Price $2.00 post paid. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION 

SOCIETY, Publishers 

150 Nassau St., New York 



FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet witn order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

BELGIAN HARES—GET YOUR BREEDERS FROM 
me, pedigreed and utility matured and young stock for 
sale, best grade stock. State wants fully, no catalog. 
ROSEDALE RABBITRY," Reliable Rabbit Raiser," 
730 College Ave., Rosedale, Kansas. 

FOR SALE—PHEASANTS, PEA FOWL, PIGEONS, 
Poultry, Bantams and Pit Games Eggs from the 
above stock for sale. Rabbits. Cavies, Squirrels, fur- 
bearing animals, etc. I buv, sell and exchange. L L. 
KIRKPATRICK, Box 273, Bristol, Tenn. 

WANTED— WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hoki and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



Pheasants Wanted 



WANTED. ELLIOTT, MIKADO. SATYR. TRAGOPAN 

and Linneated Pheasants. Mature birds only. 

Write A. J. MERLE. Alameda, Cal. qt 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Notice to Purchasers. 

Purchasers can rely upon advertisers in The Game Breeder. The Game Conservation 
Society has a committee known as the Game Guild, which investigates complaints promptly 
and insists upon fair dealing under a penalty of dismissal from membership and the loss of the 
right to advertise in the magazine. There are very few complaints in a year, for the most 
part due to shipments of eggs. These have been uniformly adjusted to the satisfaction of the 
seller and purchaser. Any member making a complaint should state that in placing his order 
he mentioned the fact that it was due to an advertisement in The Game Breeder. All mem- 
bers of the Society are urged to buy from those who support the publication by advertising 
in it. 



FIVE VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. WILD DUCKS. 

Wild Geese, Brants, Wild Turkeys and other Game, 

List for stamp. G. H HARRIS, Taylorville, Illinois. 4 t 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE— FOR FANCY DUCKS 
geese or pheasants. 15 pair of 1918 hatch Muscovey 
ducks. 15 pair 1918 pit games. Grey's, Spangles, and 
Black Breasted Reds. Genuine pit birds. Ducks 88.00 
per pair, $10.00 per trio. ED. J. MEYER, Meyer Lake 
Stock Farm, Canton. Ohio. 2t 

SEVERAL HUNDRED PHEASANTS FOR SALE, 
Ringneck, Reeves, Golden and Amherst. A. R. MIL- 
LER, East Greenbush, N. Y. 3t 

FOR SALE— Young Golden Pheasants. C. W. SIEGLER, 
Bangor, Wis. 2t 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE, THE GREATEST 

rabbit for flesh and fur in the world. Send for full 

information and price list. SIBERIAN FUR FARM, 

Hamilton, Canada. 6t 



DOGS 

HOUNDS— ALL KINDS. BIG 50 PAGE CATALOGUE 
10£. ROOKWOOD KENNELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 



FOODS 



WILD DUCK FOODS 

Wild duck food plants, and seed. Wild Celery, Sago 
Pond Weed, Widgeon grass, Red head grass, Chara 
and other kinds. 

There are hundreds of thousands of acres of water 
marshes where these, the best of duck foods, will grow 
and hold the game. Write and learn how to do it. 
WHITE'S GAME PRESERVE, Waterlily, N. C. 
Currituck Sound. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



GAMEKEEPER AT LIBERTY. RELIABLE, WANTS 
position on club preserve or game farm. Experienced 
on game and ornamental birds or animals, gun dogs and 
extermination of vermin. MILTON, in cate of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 6t 

WANTED — POSITION AS MANAGER ON GAME 
farm or shooting preserve. Long experience raising 
game birds. Understand raising and training shooting 
dogs, and trapping vermin. A S. B., care of Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED. SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. EX- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Married. 
Apply H. care of THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau 
St., New York. 



GAMEKEEPER DESIRES SITUATION, THOR- 

oughly understands all duties, etc. Best references 

from Europe and this country. M. J. F., care of The 

Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 4t 

EXPERIENCED Fish Breeder, Game Keeper and Horti- 
culturist, understands trapping and shooting, 34 years 
old, single, with best references, desires position on 
country seat of American gentleman. A. S„ care of 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

WANTED— SITUATION Ab GAMEKEEPER WITH 
a game shooting club 01 preserve owner. Experienced 
in bieeoing all species of game, dog breaking and the 
control of vermin. Good reierences. WM. J. STRANG, 
care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

RA16E SILVER FOXES. NEW SYNDICATE JUST 
started. .\ew plan. .Not much money needed. Your 
location will not interfere. Particulars free. C. T. DRYZ, 
5244 South Maplewood Ave., Chicago, Illinois'. 



FOR SALE — Two places, on "Currituck Sound" in 
heart of wild duck section, with marsh, also high land 
for quail shooting. Ideal for building game preserves, 
and shooting on sound. Address Box 1, Waterlily, N. C, 
Currituck County. 



YOUNG MAN. RETURNED FROM FOREIGN 
service. General knowledge of game breeding and 
farming. Exceptional dairy experience. Thoroughly 
experienced in handling pedigreed horses, cattle and 
sheep. Best reference. Available right away. J. A. 
TYLER, care of THOMAS MacINTYRE, 9129 121st 
Street, Richmond Hill, Long Island, N. Y. 

BREEDING STOCK OF PHEASANTS FOR SALE 
— Ringnecks, Mlver, Goldens, Mongolians, Formosan, 
Prince of Wales, Lady Amhersts, Reeves, Swinhoes, 
Melanotus, Japanese Versicolors, Manchurian Eared. 
ROBINSON BROS., Aldershot, Ont., Can. 

"THE RANCH BRED FOX," THE .BEST BOOK 
published on Fox farming. Tells all about this wonderful 
industry. Price 25c, postpaid. THE BLACK FOX 
MAGAZINE, 15 Whitehall St., New York. 

WANTED— SITUATION AS GAMEKEEPER. Ex- 
perienced on game rearing and dog training. Excellent 
references. Age 36, married. W. E. B., care of The 
Game Bieeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

WANTED, A SMALL COUNTRY PLACE ON LONG 
Island with a house of six or eight rooms and land suit- 
able for farming. State acreage, location, price and 
terms. B. J., care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. 

WANTED TO RENT, WITH PRIVILEGE OF 
purchase, Long Island farm with good buildings. Place 
must have a small pond or stream suitable for ducks. 
GAME PRESERVE, care Editor Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, New York. 



fn writing: to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sigrn your letters: "Youn for More Game.' 







Quail, Bobwhites and Other Species 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY QUAIL FROM 

Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Also Pheasant Eggs by the 1 00 &1 000 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders for Pheasants 
and Eggs, and for years I have filled practically all of 
the large State orders for both Partridges and Pheasants. 

All Pheasant Eggs Arc from My Own Pens 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Now is the Time to Buy Wild Turkey Eggs 

AND 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

1 carry the largest stock in America ol ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of England. I have tine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large Europear 
PELICANS. Also STORKS. CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acre? 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay yon to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only fiO miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 





Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY. 



BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 

Member of The Game Gi»Jd 




Game Farm or Preserve 



A large tract of land suitable for a game farm or 
preserve is offered for sale at an attractive price. 

The land is near New York on a good Automobile 
Road and contains a large pond and stream. There 
are some trout and the waters can be made to yield 
large numbers of these fish. The land is suitable for 
deer, upland game and wild ducks. I shall be pleased 
to show this property to anyone wishing to start a 
game farm or preserve. 

The place is within fifty miles of the City and can be 
reached by Automobile in an hour and a half. 

For particulars address, 

======= OWNER ========= 



Care Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York 







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